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Old 02-21-2012
ReardonRL44 ReardonRL44 is offline
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Default Unilateral breathing to the right

I have finally after a couple of months of DVD and reading TI training have become comfortable breathing. But and there is always a but, to one side (right). I understand that bilateral is the way to go but there seems to be a lot of water disturbance to the left I canít figure out yet. So I guess I have two questions.

1. When I breath bilateral (to the left) the water is so disturbed that I end up breathing in some water when I take a breath. Possible reason?

2. When I unilaterally breath (to the right) I feel calm and relaxed but after 50 meters my left shoulder becomes tight and fatigued. Possible reason?

Last edited by ReardonRL44 : 02-21-2012 at 08:30 PM.
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Old 02-21-2012
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReardonRL44 View Post
I understand that bilateral is the way to go but there seems to be a lot of water disturbance to the left I can’t figure out yet.

1. When I breath bilateral (to the left) the water is so disturbed that I end up breathing in some water when I take a breath. Possible reason?
Adjacent swimmers churning the water?    Impatience with the lead arm or failure to streamline can contribute to poor balance, which hampers breathing.

Quote:
2. When I unilaterally breath (to the right) I feel calm and relaxed but after 50 meters my left shoulder becomes tight and fatigued. Possible reason?
Perhaps you are lifting ... or turning your head too far in that direction.
Expose only one goggle to the surface. Try pursing your lips when you grab that quick bite of air (Popeye's breathing style).

You may be overly lifting your shoulder instead of swinging into recovery.
As the arm exits the water the hand should be dangling comfortably below the elbow - which leads during the first half of the recovery (marionette arm). This is the relaxation phase.
Trace a relatively straight path with the hand, just above the surface, until it enters above the shoulder. Do not cross over the center line of the body.

Check out the thread "left side sinking" in the FREESTYLE forum.

Last edited by borate : 02-22-2012 at 02:34 AM.
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  #3  
Old 02-23-2012
ScottMT ScottMT is offline
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Hi Reardon, just a thought about your tired shoulder. I'm battling a shoulder issue now and so I'm a bit fixated on shoulder mechanics and I'm no expert but here goes. When your arm is extended forward does it look like Terry on the videos so that it is about 20 or 30 degrees below horizontal? Or is it more or less horizontal and parallel to the water surface? In the horizontal position your shoulder is a very weak and dangerous position and will tire easily. Try to look like Terry.

Secondly, when in this position and breathing, is your arm still relaxed like Terry's? It is very easily to compensate for balance issues by pushing back on the water with your outstretched arm. Again, exerting your arm when the shoulder is in this dangerous position can lead to fatigue and ultimately to shoulder injury.

Because of my injury I've been doing mostly kicking only drills like skating with head lead (both arms at side). This is a good way to identify and correct balance issues and see how much you use your extended arm for balance.

Good luck!
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Old 02-23-2012
ReardonRL44 ReardonRL44 is offline
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I appreciate all the guidance (borate, Scott). I did some balance drills this morning trying to breath in the sweet spot. I do believe that I am over rotating to the right causing me to sink. I worked on it but couldnít get it right. I will keep trying. Also with the sinking my arm is being pulled into a more parallel direction which could be causing all the strain. I will continue to work on the balance and rotation to mineralize the sinking. I hope with this the breathing will come. This morning doing 100ís left me gasping for breath the whole time.
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Old 02-25-2012
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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I was originally taught to breathe on only one side, and my attempts to switch to bilateral breathing were unsuccessful until I went to a TI weekend workshop in February of 1999. Even today, my breathing is still a little lopsided, but I've found that it helps if I analyze the asymmetries in my breathing.

For example, I noticed at one point that when I was breathing on my "good" (i.e., my right) side, my eyes would be looking back in the direction from which I had been coming, while when I was breathing on my "bad" (i.e., my left) side, my eyes would be looking at the side wall. So I tried to consciously look back when I was breathing on my left side and to consciously look at the side wall when I was breathing on my right side, and immediately my breathing became more symmetric.


Bob
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