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  #1  
Old 09-29-2013
mbruse mbruse is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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mbruse
Default Some advice on my swim technique

Hi All,

I was wondering if I could get some input on my stroke. I am feeling more comfortable in the water these days, but for some reason when I watch the video it looks much different than if feels.

Here's the video.

http://youtu.be/P5Yt32CkIgE
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  #2  
Old 09-29-2013
nurledge nurledge is offline
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You may want to let the other leg left floating naturally while the other doing the flick/kick, that would probably reduce the scissor-like kick. At certain point the head position maybe too deep; may be compared to the position when we are doing superman glide/flutter drill. I'm TI student, the coach would re mediate better.
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  #3  
Old 09-29-2013
tony0000 tony0000 is offline
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Don't begin your pull until the other hand enters the water. Until it does, the arm that will pull should be extended in front of you, waiting patiently. You do this sometimes, but you do not do it consistently. Also, it difficult to tell which leg you are kicking, since they seem to be moving simultaneously. In TI, only the opposite leg kicks, the other just trails in the water.

Hope this helps.

Good luck,

Tony
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  #4  
Old 09-29-2013
tomoy tomoy is offline
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Wow, you're a dense guy ;-P That is, something about your bones and muscle puts your natural buoyancy pretty low in the water. I've seen a couple super fit guys that had similar issues. So some prescriptions... not sure how TI these are, so take with a grain of salt because I don't have real experience to know how to best help.

I think it would help to rotate less. Imagine a disc laid flat in the water. It has a lot of surface area basically holding it up. Drop that thing in sideways though, and it slices right through and sinks. I think you do that when you rotate, especially on the breathing stroke. So work on skating with just the shoulder out of the water, like 30-deg. Stay away from the slicing plate 90-deg. position. Also spear to wider skate targets, that will help you stay more level.

Agree with above posters too, especially that you might be holding or pushing your head more deeply than necessary. I've been discovering this for myself lately. I mean, it makes you nice and parallel in the water, but it makes breathing a struggle, which leads to over-rotating, which as in the above leads to sinking. So just a slight lift, maybe 10-deg. It doesn't have to be a jaw-forward lift, just imagine someone pulling the back of your head up to the air - more like a straightening posture move.

The more controversial thought is to alter your breathing so that more air is in your lungs more of the time. I know you don't want to take a big breath and hold it in until you breathe. But maybe focus on letting it out more slowly as you exhale - then when you're going to breathe, push out the air remaining in your lungs at the last moment as you rotate.

Hopefully something here can help. Otherwise looking good and relaxed in the water. You're taking the term total immersion seriously! Yeah, the kick could be less wide, but the timing is good so I'd worry about the deepness in the water first.

Cheers.
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  #5  
Old 10-01-2013
mbruse mbruse is offline
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mbruse
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LOL - yes, that's a good way to put it. Very dense and I sink well!

I have thought about it and never once have I thought of keeping the other leg still. I've been emulating a scissor kick all this time.

You have given me some good things to think about.

Thanks
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  #6  
Old 10-01-2013
Osmond Osmond is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbruse View Post
Hi All,

I was wondering if I could get some input on my stroke. I am feeling more comfortable in the water these days, but for some reason when I watch the video it looks much different than if feels.

Here's the video.

http://youtu.be/P5Yt32CkIgE
Hi Mbruse,

You're level of comfort looks great! I'm fairly new to this as well but from some angles of the video it appears that part of your rotation issue could be caused by how your elbow is exiting the water and coming towards your back rather than out to the side to get into that nice tracking position.
Take your time with your patient hand, wait for that peirce..... To help with the elbow position swing switch could be a good drill to visit to work on the elbow position before whole stroking.
As for the scissor kick try a set of flips to feel whats really going on with the legs, I find I feel the back end way more with flips on.
Keep it up!
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  #7  
Old 10-02-2013
mbruse mbruse is offline
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Tonight I went back to the pool with the intent of floating higher, using wider tracks, keeping my legs from scissor kicking.

Well, I think I uncovered more failings so I think I am headed in the right direction. :)

My estimation is that I really need some help with the patient lead hand as it seems the wider the track the quicker the lead hand wants to retract like a rubber band.

My head still seems to sink and as I get tired I appear to be submerging and the coming back up for air.

I'm definitely more sore in my shoulders than I have been in awhile. I also noticed that my wide tracks let my arms go deeper in the water after the from of the vw bug.

I suppose I might try flippers if that helps me stay higher in the water but I'm concerned I'm not really addressing what is causing me to sink in the long term. Maybe I need to lose some density or get more propulsion going to keep myself higher in the water.

I also seem to be having a problem getting my hand out of the water on the return.

Anyways, thanks everybody for your advice and observations as it has provoked me to think differently about what I feel about my stroke.
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  #8  
Old 10-02-2013
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
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Hello mbruse,

your stroke looks as if you feel well in water and freestyle. Go on there!

Quote:
...but I'm concerned I'm not really addressing what is causing me to sink in the long term...
Three non chaoch hints:

- Your spearing should be as narrow as your shoulders. Rotation will become a little easier, because your body will rotate nearer the axis.
- It seems to me as if the angle between upper legs and body is not 180°. If that's fact, this will produce a lot of drag and your sink feeling. (Sitting at a desk long times?) SGs with a subsequent (half)stroke might transform the right feeling.
- Put your look down to the pool bottom and focus on steady laser beam to a point at opposite pool site. That will help against sinking legs. (For some of us, as me, achieving will be a long time goal...)

Best regards,
Werner
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  #9  
Old 10-15-2013
ernewill ernewill is offline
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Some thoughts from a humble non-expert swimmer,
I agree with much of the above. It seems like when your hand and arm enter the water that you are "spearing" too much. I see a splash along your upper arm. I used to spear too much and it actually drove me out of alignment and made me sink a little. This then makes it more difficult to breath. Then I ended up craning my neck a little to breath to compensate for my position deep in the water. Too much spear and some neck craning will give a sinking feeling. The last lessons I had with TL he emphasized a relaxed hand dropping (not spearing) into place through the mail slot and into position to start the pull.
As others have said, you need to exercise the patient hand. You appear to start your pull early. Try swimming several laps very relaxed and not making a splash as you start your stroke. Let you entering arm go through the slot using its natural weight. Add to this the catch up drill where you don't start to pull until the hand entering the water is side by side with the hand ready to pull. Finally you may want to rotate your head a little sooner to breath. As soon as you start your pull you should be rotating into breathing position. You seem to be getting into breathing position at the end of your pull.
Good luck, getting a good swim stroke can be a challenge yet fun. It seems like my stroke falls apart somewhere in every workout due to fatigue or lack of focus. When it comes together it feels awesome.
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