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  #1  
Old 01-08-2009
craigalan craigalan is offline
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craigalan
Default loosing boyancy as i breath

hello all,
i've been practicing TI for about a year now, still have trouble with rythmic breathing.

with each "bite" of air, i find myself deeper in the water. after several breaths, i find i'm several inches under when i try to get a breath. it seems the more i breath the deeper i swim, rather disconcerting to say the least.

any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, i'm getting rather frustrated. after all this time, i still can't swim more the 50m without have to stop and catch my breath.

thanks in advance,
c.
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  #2  
Old 01-08-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Do you feel as if you can't get air because of a balance problem where your legs are dropping or do you find yourself with the head and front end lower than your legs?

here are some tips;

Relax whole body !
don't push the head down
Relax head and neck in a neutral position always
Look down
find optimal clock position for the spearing hand
keep relaxed hand below elbow as you spear forward
Lean in to the water
Don't over roll to stacked shoulders but roll just enough to clear shoulder.
when you roll to breathe don't slow down or make it a stopping point .In other words roll to your breath and keep the body moving as you breathe just as in non breathing strokes to keep momentum so the body does not sink.


Dave
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  #3  
Old 01-09-2009
craigalan craigalan is offline
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craigalan
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hey dave,
thanks for the reply.

r.e. my balance, it actually feels pretty good. i think i'm staying pretty level in the water, but as i progress down the pool, i can feel the water level rising on my recovering arm, as i slowly run deeper and deeper.

i'm sure i'd end up scraping the bottom of the pool if i were to swim long enough...

thanks for the tips, i'll try them in the morning. assuming that my balance actually IS as good as it feels, do you think there's value in spending time going back over all the basic drills, i.e. starting over from the beginning?

thanks greatly!
c.
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  #4  
Old 01-09-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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It definitely can't hurt. I've been doing TI for 13 years or so and do drills sometimes.

Dave
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  #5  
Old 01-09-2009
AWP AWP is offline
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AWP
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Hi Craigalan,

Play out your progression if you would. How long did you spend on the drill progression? On each drill? How did you feel on each?
At what point did you begin rhythmic breathing?
Are you at whole stroke practice?
Want to help.
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  #6  
Old 01-09-2009
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigalan View Post
r.e. my balance, it actually feels pretty good. i think i'm staying pretty level in the water, but as i progress down the pool, i can feel the water level rising on my recovering arm, as i slowly run deeper and deeper.

i'm sure i'd end up scraping the bottom of the pool if i were to swim long enough...
I coached a swimmer awhile back who developed this problem. It turned out that he was literally swimming "downhill"! When he had taken his first lesson, he had had enormous trouble keeping his legs from sinking. Since that time, his balance had improved so much that he was overcompensating and unbalancing himself in the opposite direction, causing him to literally swim downward. Once we corrected this, he had no further problems.


Bob
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  #7  
Old 01-09-2009
rjsteadman rjsteadman is offline
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rjsteadman
Default Weak side breathing

Sorry, mis-post.
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  #8  
Old 01-10-2009
craigalan craigalan is offline
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dave,
at the pool yesterday i started basically from scratch. reevaluating my skating position i think i may be over-rotating as you suggested. i spent several lengths skating, spear switch and over switch with a pause before entering the recovery arm.

without much focus on actually breathing. i actually felt faster in the water, the few breaths i did take seemed better, but not enough to decide if it was actually improved.

i'll continue spending more time on skating and some of the basics... hopefully that'll help.

awp, asked about my progression through the drill etc...

i was by no stretch of the imagination a swimmer when, i attended a weekend camp in nov. '07, with the intention of completing a sprint tri the following may (on the weekend of my 45th birthday). so unlike some of the others in the class, i didn't have old habits to break or a stroke to fix, i didn't have a stroke at all...

started going to the pool almost daily, working my way through the drills. while the drills all felt great i never achieved rhythmic breathing. i finished the tri with sweetspot breathing, almost the last person out of the pool, next to last in my age group... but i did finish.

after the tri, i swim three mornings per week and hour each session.

something in the early summer i started spending more of my pool time (attempting) to swim. slowly i started to realize that i wasn't really progressing, reset everything and spent about a month starting with the fish drills and working my way through to zipper switch and ear hops. all the while not really worrying about breathing.

i found it really helpful to restart the drill sequences, after practicing for several months i had a much greater awareness of what to look for while working on the base drills. after a few weeks, i found my balance greatly improved. then started again, spending more time swimming.

this is where i'm at now. i believe my stroke and balance are pretty good, at least if feels that way (i often wonder what it looks like!). if i concentrate and everything works well, i can cover the 25m pool in 11 strokes, with one breath at the midway point. on average my spl is around 14.

but i'm only good for one length, if i'm lucky 2, once i start trying to breath.

thanks everyone for your interest and suggestions, it is greatly appreciated!!!
c.
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  #9  
Old 04-22-2009
ikarus47 ikarus47 is offline
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ikarus47
Default sinking and exhaling

I think I have a similar issue; I have been trying to convert my distance swimming (1+ mile in the pool) to breathing every 3rd stroke. My goal: gain symmetry, and force myself to swim more efficiently. I had noticed that my R shoulder was starting to ache before (breathing predominantly left- an indication that I am still using my arms to assist buoyancy when coming up for air).

The conversion is proving hard (only a couple of days trying). Main thing I am feeling is a need to hold on to my breath (I think again for buoyancy) until just before coming up for air, which results in a poor and short and incomplete breath. I do try a slow steady exhalation, but I find myself sinking, again resulting in difficulties rotating up for air. It seems like a catch 22: either I hold on to air in my lungs and I float more easily (but breathe in poorly), or I exhale well, get deeper in the water and have trouble rotating up for air. I do not think I am overcompensating balance issues (ie actually swimming downhill), but I cannot see myself swim.

I forget how I got through this breathing every other, perhaps q2 breathing leaves more margin for error...
Anyone with suggestions?
Andreas.
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  #10  
Old 04-22-2009
madvet madvet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ikarus47 View Post
I think I have a similar issue; I have been trying to convert my distance swimming (1+ mile in the pool) to breathing every 3rd stroke. My goal: gain symmetry, and force myself to swim more efficiently. I had noticed that my R shoulder was starting to ache before (breathing predominantly left- an indication that I am still using my arms to assist buoyancy when coming up for air).

Andreas.
It doesn't sound like the every-3rd-stroke is doing you any good. Balance and symmetry are good things (of course). You would probably be better breathing every 2 strokes while changing breathing sides every length or lap.

The shoulder aching? Keep your elbows wide (well outside your body outline). Most swimmers bring the elbows in during the pull. That can impinge your shoulder.
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