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  #21  
Old 07-23-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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robedon
Default thanks for more tips

BASE, thanks for the drill to help. I may be exhaling too fast, as sometimes I feel like have no air immediately after I breathe. I just can't tell if I am not getting enough breath or releasing what I get too fast.

I am happy to hear from the people that are overcoming this problem. I've been swimming very consistently and feel I'm improving, but I'm not where I want to be. I really want to be able to swim a mile, or more.
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  #22  
Old 07-24-2010
phenixrising phenixrising is offline
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Default I'm barely ahead of you, but I finally got it!

I'm 47, run/ride all the time, great cardio shape. I am just getting my swim down. I can't offer much, but I was just where you are about 2 weeks ago. I knew it couldn't be my fitness, but I ran out of air quickly also. I could only swim about 100 yards. Here are a few keys that I finally figured out accidentally and now I can suddenly swim 1000 yards, lol. I don't know which of these may help the most, but they all were a factor in my unlocking "the key". First, I slowed WAY down. I swam at a ridiculously slow pace and relaxed. I quit thinking about form for the time being, and relaxed. As I turned to breathe I looked at stuff just out of the pool and thought about it, not swimming. Also, I just breathe every stroke to the right (I can learn left side later) and I still blow out easy the whole time under water, but mainly I focus on blowing out harder right before I inhale. After practice, now it feels rhythmic and natural like when I'm running. I honestly quit trying to swim with perfect form, and now that I can keep swimming, I am working on my form. If you are holding stale air in your lungs, it's not doing you any good. If you feel like you need to get all of it out, practice getting it out fairly often by taking a huge gulp of air (rolling over a little more and look skyward). The whole deal is like a sprinter trying to run a mile at 100 meter pace. Just slow down to a steady crawl. Speed we can get later. Hope this helps. I'm not very good, but I know exactly where you are!
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  #23  
Old 07-24-2010
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Default similar ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by phenixrising View Post
First, I slowed WAY down. I swam at a ridiculously slow pace and relaxed. I quit thinking about form for the time being, and relaxed.
Like phenixrising says, I'm trying to relax by going slowly (not that I had any great speed in the first place) and by doing this I was more relaxed; and it followed that the trickle breathing was much more attainable. Today I also spent some time with the "Nicodemus bob" technique for a number of pool lengths.

I also feel that I am trying to breath too deeply. In doing that I find there is a pause after I get all the air I can, thinking that a pause may give me even more air. This is a habit which when I can break, I then find things move more smoothly and breathing is more natural as in the "Nicodemus bob" drill. Breathe as if not in the water. Breathe naturally. This was my focus today ~ and it helped.
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Last edited by Mike from NS : 07-25-2010 at 01:57 PM.
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  #24  
Old 07-26-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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Default slowing down

do you not find it hard to slow down? I feel like I can do it for a few strokes, and then I start to sink.
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  #25  
Old 07-26-2010
atreides atreides is offline
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Originally Posted by robedon View Post
do you not find it hard to slow down? I feel like I can do it for a few strokes, and then I start to sink.
Here's the thing. There is the feeling of sinking and actually doing it. Until recently, I always felt like my backside was sinking if I didn't maintain a certain speed. Maintaining the speed and keeping myself straight like a board was what I thought I needed to swim correctly. Well that introduced tension which cause me to fatigue very rapidly. Also I was swimming very rapidly ( I estimate .9 or 1.0 temp). No wonder I was getting out of breath.

Well two things have helped me. Terry's new video explains the weight shift and the compact recovery so that I understand what to do. The neat thing about it is that he explains how to recover and almost guarantee a good catch. A good catch and proper weight shift means more foreward propulsion with less energy used. This means I can slow my stroke cycle down but still generate enough momentum so I that I don't think I'm sinking. Plus since I'm not stroking at 100 mph, I can work on the relaxation thing.

Secondly, I proved to myself that I wasn't sinking or at least I was falling out of horizontal balance. Try a superman glide. Near the end you start sinking backside first. Now do the same glide and kick ever so lightly. If you have your head and arms in the proper position, you'll run out of air before you sink. Now try it and do a two beat kick the way you would if your were swimming. You still don't sink in the back. If you're like me and you have been doing balance drills for months, you probably have pretty good balance.

Now being balanced and not sinking a little bit are two different things. You may sink a little bit the slower you go but so long has you are horizontal all you have done as "sinked into support". You may need to rotate little more to breathe but it should be nothing major. Once you have convinced yourself that nothing bad is happening because you have slowed down. you can relax even more. Now its a "patience game". Because you have slowed down, it's going to take you longer to get to the other. There's going to be this urge to speed it up. That's where I've got to my work. May you too.
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  #26  
Old 08-26-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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Default breaths too deep

swimming this moring I may have finally figured out that I have been breathing in too much air. I know the video says take a bite of air. I've had a hard time figuring out exactly what a bite of air is. does anyone have a good comparison to how much to breathe in?
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  #27  
Old 08-26-2010
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robedon View Post
swimming this moring I may have finally figured out that I have been breathing in too much air. I know the video says take a bite of air. I've had a hard time figuring out exactly what a bite of air is. does anyone have a good comparison to how much to breathe in?
Back in the early 80s, I realized that my one-sided, head-lifting stroke might improve if I learned to bi-breathe every third stroke.
I did, and it did - but it took me months to get into the rhythm.

At slow pacing, I don't pay much mind to it now, and concur with Mike (above): "Breathe as if not in the water. Breathe naturally."

If you feel deprived of air, you might switch to breathing every stroke for a while.
Or breathe to one side only for a lap or two, until you are again comfortable with one alternating breath every three strokes.
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  #28  
Old 08-28-2010
flppr flppr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robedon View Post
swimming this moring I may have finally figured out that I have been breathing in too much air. I know the video says take a bite of air. I've had a hard time figuring out exactly what a bite of air is. does anyone have a good comparison to how much to breathe in?
my interpretation of a bite if air is the amount you would inhale in a normal breath at rest.

Last edited by flppr : 08-28-2010 at 10:43 PM.
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  #29  
Old 08-28-2010
panamsh panamsh is offline
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You have gotten wonderful tips. Be patient. Try them all. Try mine also.
Buy the Easy Freestyle: 21st Century Techniques for Beginners to Advanced Swimmers DVD. Play and study the drills three times before trying any of them. Practice one drill per day.
Before swimming I do forty slow bubbles to begin. I say bubble, bubble, and breathe, bubble, bubble,and breathe several times. I am to-tally relaxed while I am doing this drill. Try to move very slowly, very relaxed. Let the water support your head. When you do your first lap and you are still tired, do thirty bubbles, and so on.
I am 82 years old. I swim very slowly, using the ti method. I do a good many 100yds. without being out of breath. When this happens I do my back stroke drills, and then return to my crawl or underwater switch. Focos on relaxing, a good body position, extend that lead arm to help with balancing, and replay the DVD drills in your head while swimming. Try to memorize them. Swimming is fun. Enjoy!
Silvia
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  #30  
Old 08-31-2010
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flppr View Post
my interpretation of a bite if air is the amount you would inhale in a normal breath at rest.
Didn't I read or hear recently something where Terry equated the "bite" of air to the same or similar amount of air as when you're singing and grab some air between musical phrases of the song?
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