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  #1  
Old 06-24-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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robedon
Default getting out of breath, still

My swimming history: I've been swimming consistently for about 4 months, and have done the weekend TI class and and taken lessons at the local pool.

my condition: I'm 37, and I work out in the gym 5 days a week, run 3-5 miles 3 days a week, and swim (or try to) 3 days a week.

my Problem: The biggest problem I am having is that I get out of breath very quickly, even after one length. I recently started working with a triathlon coach and he said I'm out of breath because I don't have ample endurance. I agree, you can always be in better shape, but I have a hard time thinking with all the exercise I do that I am out of breath because of endurance.
For some reason I just can not get the hang of breathing in the water. I try to exhale while swimming, and as I cross the pool I feel like I have no air in my lungs. I can't tell if I'm not breathing in correctly or if I'm not fully breathing out or what I'm doing.

anyone have an exercise I can do to practice breathing?

I'm frustrated that I'm not swimming a greater distance without stopping from being winded.
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  #2  
Old 06-25-2010
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robedon View Post
My swimming history: I've been swimming consistently for about 4 months, and have done the weekend TI class and and taken lessons at the local pool.

my condition: I'm 37, and I work out in the gym 5 days a week, run 3-5 miles 3 days a week, and swim (or try to) 3 days a week.

my Problem: The biggest problem I am having is that I get out of breath very quickly, even after one length. I recently started working with a triathlon coach and he said I'm out of breath because I don't have ample endurance. I agree, you can always be in better shape, but I have a hard time thinking with all the exercise I do that I am out of breath because of endurance.
I agree.

Quote:
For some reason I just can not get the hang of breathing in the water. I try to exhale while swimming, and as I cross the pool I feel like I have no air in my lungs. I can't tell if I'm not breathing in correctly or if I'm not fully breathing out or what I'm doing.
What happens if you do overswitch instead of whole stroke swimming (i.e., roll to your sweet spot to breathe instead of taking a normal breath)? How far can you go before you start to feel out of breath?
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  #3  
Old 06-25-2010
madvet madvet is offline
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madvet
Default Relaxed breathing

Quote:
Originally Posted by robedon View Post
I try to exhale while swimming, and as I cross the pool I feel like I have no air in my lungs. .
Breathing is the most simple thing, except it is not. Yes, you could be in better shape, but not so bad that you can't complete 1 length, otherwise you wouldn't be doing triathlons.

Mastering relaxed breathing is the key to going from 10 yards to 10,000.

The more you can match your breathing to what you would be doing at a brisk walk in the open air, the better.
1) No tension in the neck shoulders and chest.
2) No forceful exhalation or inhalation. More effort than you would be doing standing still, but like I said, about what you do at a brisk walk. People who run are used to breathing harder, but it doesn't work at the slower breathing rate you are limited to while swimming.
3) Inhale when your arms aren't actively pulling -- you can't open your chest, while your back and chest muscles are working to close your chest.

If this is not working, "listen" more closely for excess tension.
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Madison, Wisconsin
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  #4  
Old 06-25-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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thanks for the tips. I have a very hard time relaxing and letting things flow naturally. I'm going to trying rolling to the sweet spot to see how that does for losing breath tonight. your help is much appreciated.
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  #5  
Old 06-26-2010
splashingpat splashingpat is offline
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splashingpat
Default if ya can do 10 bobbing breaths...ya really GOT IT! DO N'T yA?

Quote:
Originally Posted by madvet View Post
Breathing is the most simple thing,
except
it is not.

Yes, you could be in better shape, but not so bad
that you can't complete 1 length,
otherwise you wouldn't be doing triathlons.

Mastering relaxed breathing
is
the key to going from 10 yards to 10,000.

The more you can match your breathing to what you would be doing at a brisk walk in the open air, the better.
1) No tension in the neck shoulders and chest.
2) No forceful exhalation or inhalation. More effort than you would be doing standing still, but like I said, about what you do at a brisk walk. People who run are used to breathing harder, but it doesn't work at the slower breathing rate you are limited to while swimming.
3) Inhale when your arms aren't actively pulling -- you can't open your chest, while your back and chest muscles are working to close your chest.

If this is not working, "listen" more closely for excess tension.
IT'S GREAT TO VERBALIZE THE ANSWER
AIN'T IT?
splash'n'pat!

Last edited by splashingpat : 07-01-2010 at 02:41 PM.
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  #6  
Old 06-26-2010
sinker sinker is offline
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Location: michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robedon View Post
My swimming history: I've been swimming consistently for about 4 months, and have done the weekend TI class and and taken lessons at the local pool.

my condition: I'm 37, and I work out in the gym 5 days a week, run 3-5 miles 3 days a week, and swim (or try to) 3 days a week.

my Problem: The biggest problem I am having is that I get out of breath very quickly, even after one length. I recently started working with a triathlon coach and he said I'm out of breath because I don't have ample endurance. I agree, you can always be in better shape, but I have a hard time thinking with all the exercise I do that I am out of breath because of endurance.
For some reason I just can not get the hang of breathing in the water. I try to exhale while swimming, and as I cross the pool I feel like I have no air in my lungs. I can't tell if I'm not breathing in correctly or if I'm not fully breathing out or what I'm doing.

anyone have an exercise I can do to practice breathing?

I'm frustrated that I'm not swimming a greater distance without stopping from being winded.
Robedon,
Because of the same breathing problem, I used a swimmer's snorkel to develop enough of the other TI skills necessary to finally put the lie to my username.
For what it's worth, here is the two pronged process that cured the dreaded breathless curse for me.
1. I had a theory that a buildup of carbon dioxide was my main problem. I noticed that I was holding my breath for a second or two after taking a breath, before slowly letting it out until the next stroke. My uneducated theory was that when closing off my airway to "hold" my breath, I was "pounding" some carbon dioxide into my lungs (think of closing your airway's valve). I then reasoned that the solution should be to be blowing air out seamlessly from the moment of inhalation. The goal was to see bubbles rising the nanosecond my head hit the water after a breath. This curative process was aided by ---------------

2. A post by Nicodemis. The basics are simple. I started from the wall with a slow superman glide, and then simply bob up every 4 or 5 seconds for a quick "bite" of air, using a crude breaststroke or whatever it takes, keeping it simple. The key here is to NEVER hold your breath. A quick bite of air, then into the water with your head, blowing bubbles at a pace that will get all air out just in time for the next bite of air. I did this at the slow pace of about 10 minutes for a 50 yard lap. I was amazed at how easy this was. I did one of these slow laps at the start of each of the next 2 or 3 swims. The first freestyle test I took slowly with enough rotation to easily get to air, and I arrived at the other wall with no breathlesness at all. Problem solved !!

It is wonderful to practice other TI skills free of the snorkel, knowing that I will always have access to air and utilize it properly.

PS---It definitely ain't your conditioning. I am a 66 year old former couch potato with 25 more pounds to lose. The BMI chart says that I just graduated from the "obese" category to merely "fat".
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  #7  
Old 06-28-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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thanks for the tips. it is definitely giving me some stuff to work on. this is great.
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  #8  
Old 06-29-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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robedon
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This morning I tried a couple of different things and now I think I'm not getting proper air when I inhale. I held onto the wall and had my face in the water and didn't get out of breath, but after a minute was short of breath. I bubbled out the whole time.

So now I need to figure out how to draw a breath in. this would make sense since I often feel like I don't have any air to bubble out when I'm swimming. Breathing should be such a natural thing, so I'm sure it is hard to explain how everyone breathes in.

Anyone have some additional tips to offer?

thanks
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  #9  
Old 06-29-2010
splashingpat splashingpat is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 589
splashingpat
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by robedon View Post
This morning I tried a couple of different things and now I think I'm not getting proper air when I inhale. I held onto the wall and had my face in the water and didn't get out of breath, but after a minute was short of breath. I bubbled out the whole time.

So now I need to figure out how to draw a breath in. this would make sense since I often feel like I don't have any air to bubble out when I'm swimming. Breathing should be such a natural thing, so I'm sure it is hard to explain how everyone breathes in.

Anyone have some additional tips to offer?

thanks
IT'S REALLY PRETTY SIMPLE TO BREATH IN!
YOU BLOW OR BUBBLE OUT(thru nose/&or mouth)
THEN IT TAKES ABOUT ANOTHER SECOND...i take the second underwater so when I come up my mouth is ready to grab the air!
TO CHANGE TO THE INHALE A CUP OF AIR THRU YOUR MOUTH?

REVIEW THE HAPPY LAPS VIDEO!
MANY DO THE EXERCISE ANYWAY
AT THE COMPUTER, DRIVING IN THE CAR, AND EVEN
AT THE POOL!

there are many other post are breathing out and inhaling in!
absorb 'em all
& you will be ready to go!

it's best to have someone BOB AND BREATH WITH YA....
BECAUSE YOU COULD BE DOING SOMETHING WE ARE NOT DOING!

Last edited by splashingpat : 06-30-2010 at 07:43 PM.
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  #10  
Old 07-01-2010
robedon robedon is offline
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robedon
Default inhaling too hard

in the pool this morning, I realized that maybe I have been breathing in too much. could that be the case?
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