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  #11  
Old 08-22-2017
Deepakti
 
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Hello Maureen

Thank you for sharing your experience.
Like you, I'm also a fitness swimmer. This mask grabs my attention. I would like to know more about this mask so that I can order one for me.

Many Thanks

Deepak
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  #12  
Old 08-25-2017
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Posts: 820
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Maureen,
You should learn a proper breathing rhythm and not rely on masks or nose clips for the long run. In my opinion their ok to use to learn with or for over coming a fear for the short run. You say you breathe out through your mouth so why not breathe out through your nose too ? Breathing out through your nose even very slightly will not allow water to enter . A properly timed breathing rhythm will also not allow water to enter your nose meaning waiting for your face to clear the water before you inhale .

Dave

Last edited by daveblt : 08-27-2017 at 01:24 AM.
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  #13  
Old 10-11-2017
gparlagh
 
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Default my story

Just I think I post my story about breathing to give motivation and tips to people who are still struggling...

I restarted freestyle swimming about 5 months ago. The same as with others, I do several sports, I am fit, but I was out of breath after 1 length of 33m pool. The relearn process included technical refinements, TI instead of survival freestyle, I lengthened my stroke from 36 to an average of 27-28, changed to 2BK, etc. But the breathing did not came. I managed to do 2 lengths, but there was no chance for more.

I used bilateral breathing, as it is symmetrical, and from earlier experience it came naturally. Then I tried breathing at every second stroke, but it felt awkward, asymmetrical, but I realised that it was closer to normal breathing. Exhalation into the water was not the best at the beginning, but I improved and managed to exhale into the water normally.

Then read about the bobs, I practiced, and made some progress, or at least I was able to swim 2 lengths in a row whenever I wanted. But no progression towards 3 or more...

Then I realized, that the most important factor is to breath naturally. Or at least as close to the natural way as possible. That also means that in case my body tells me to breathe, I should breathe immediately, or tension and out of breath feeling increases, and I needed to stop. This brought me back to breathing at every 2nd stroke. And voila, it works. First 4 lengths in a row. Next time 6. Next time 18 (600m), today 26 (nearly 1 km, and I stopped because I reached the daily target 2 km). Every day it gets easier. For symmetry I keep alternating the breathing side at every length.

To sum up, find your pattern, what feels natural, and stick with it!
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  #14  
Old 10-12-2017
CoachTeresa CoachTeresa is offline
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Congratulations on sticking with the process and finding success with your breathing. Can you give us an idea of how long your trial and error process took? I know for some, breathing comes in about a month's long practice but for others it can take many months to find rhythm on longer sets.




Quote:
Originally Posted by gparlagh View Post
Just I think I post my story about breathing to give motivation and tips to people who are still struggling...

I restarted freestyle swimming about 5 months ago. The same as with others, I do several sports, I am fit, but I was out of breath after 1 length of 33m pool. The relearn process included technical refinements, TI instead of survival freestyle, I lengthened my stroke from 36 to an average of 27-28, changed to 2BK, etc. But the breathing did not came. I managed to do 2 lengths, but there was no chance for more.

I used bilateral breathing, as it is symmetrical, and from earlier experience it came naturally. Then I tried breathing at every second stroke, but it felt awkward, asymmetrical, but I realised that it was closer to normal breathing. Exhalation into the water was not the best at the beginning, but I improved and managed to exhale into the water normally.

Then read about the bobs, I practiced, and made some progress, or at least I was able to swim 2 lengths in a row whenever I wanted. But no progression towards 3 or more...

Then I realized, that the most important factor is to breath naturally. Or at least as close to the natural way as possible. That also means that in case my body tells me to breathe, I should breathe immediately, or tension and out of breath feeling increases, and I needed to stop. This brought me back to breathing at every 2nd stroke. And voila, it works. First 4 lengths in a row. Next time 6. Next time 18 (600m), today 26 (nearly 1 km, and I stopped because I reached the daily target 2 km). Every day it gets easier. For symmetry I keep alternating the breathing side at every length.

To sum up, find your pattern, what feels natural, and stick with it!
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  #15  
Old 10-12-2017
gparlagh
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachTeresa View Post
Can you give us an idea of how long your trial and error process took?
I am not really sure about the time span, as I realized at the very first occasion that the breathing will be the key factor. I started a targeted work on the breathing about 2 months ago. I needed 1 month to realize that my breathing should be as close to the natural breathing habits as possible. With the bobs I spent another 2 weeks, and they really helped me to figure out my breathing rhythm. I have to add, that I swim only 2 times a week.
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  #16  
Old 10-13-2017
CoachTeresa CoachTeresa is offline
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Your experience is a true account for many for many adult onset swimmers. A minimum of 2-3 months of conscious competence practice. For some, the breathing is such a challenge they stop the process. Your perseverance is something you should feel very proud of!
Quote:
Originally Posted by gparlagh View Post
I am not really sure about the time span, as I realized at the very first occasion that the breathing will be the key factor. I started a targeted work on the breathing about 2 months ago. I needed 1 month to realize that my breathing should be as close to the natural breathing habits as possible. With the bobs I spent another 2 weeks, and they really helped me to figure out my breathing rhythm. I have to add, that I swim only 2 times a week.
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  #17  
Old 10-30-2017
MenalcasPowell
 
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Default The "aha" insight about breathing

I write this having just returned from the pool after having a breakthrough on swim breathing. After watching videos of Terry swim I got in the pool and allowed my body to relax down into the water and let the water completely support me. This entailed letting my face to stay down facing the bottom of the pool, instead of looking ahead, and also allowing my body and head to sit well down in the water, probably slightly below the water, like a giant wet log.
The result was a profound relaxation in the water and a gigantic reduction in effort. Normally I have to stop and catch my breath every 100 yards before I can continue. After experimenting for 15 or 20 laps I really was able to truly relax and was able to swim 1500 yards without stopping to catch my breath! Just a gigantic shift in the way I swim.
My take on what happened is I acquired a physical skill based on an psychological emotional shift of complete surrender and allowing the water to completely support my body. I could recognize how much effort I was making trying to breathe with an elevated forehead and also trying to plane along the top of the water. The one thing I noted with the relaxed head position was I did tend to get a lot of water up nose, as though my nostrils were facing upward rather than downwards.
So exciting, and wonderful to have such a huge shift in performance that was not based at all on level of fitness.
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  #18  
Old 11-30-2017
CoachTeresa CoachTeresa is offline
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What a wonderful account of your breathing success. Totally surrender! I imagined you relaxing your head on a fluffy pillow as your took your breath. Congratulations!
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  #19  
Old 12-05-2017
Tom Pamperin Tom Pamperin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MenalcasPowell View Post
After watching videos of Terry swim I got in the pool and allowed my body to relax down into the water and let the water completely support me. This entailed letting my face to stay down facing the bottom of the pool, instead of looking ahead, and also allowing my body and head to sit well down in the water, probably slightly below the water, like a giant wet log.
The result was a profound relaxation in the water and a gigantic reduction in effort...
Yes! I love those big breakthrough moments. You are right about learning to let the water support you completely. People who don't know how to do this find swimming intimidating. Once you know how, you might as well be lying on a big comfy couch--the water is that friendly.

Congratulations, and enjoy the next step in your TI practice.
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Tom
www.tompamperin.com
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