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  #1  
Old 09-10-2016
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Zenturtle
Default The Peaty revolution.

Breaststroke will change now. Peatys stroke is different than the other ones.
His teether tother between hips and head is far more ¨pronounced than other swimmers.ITs all high rev communicating masses in a more vertical direction. No long strokes anymore.
A short pumping action that looks like a blend of power and rhythm that doesnt look like streamlined fishlike swimming anymore.
It looks like a unique human invented way to move through the water.
Streamline is still important in the water offcourse, but the basic action looks very earthbased. reminds me of babys action trying to move forward when legs are in a sack, bouncing forward in a very crude snakelike action.
Breastroke is more and more moving to an upperbody dominated sport, together with a strong core action, legs only used as a ratched mechanism to anchor and lock the potential energy from the extreme upperbody lifting to stop and prevent it slip backward, but anchor and launch forward to the next upperbody dominated action.
Peaty is not looking longer than he actually is in the water, but shorter.
Going to try this extreme style more in my swims and try to make it work. Think I have to go to the gym now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsGHSe6N06w
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmIY...8#t=186.779788

Last edited by Zenturtle : 09-10-2016 at 11:12 AM.
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  #2  
Old 09-15-2016
ScoopUK
 
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Yeah it's an interesting progression.

Hips are connected to the head via the spine. If you get the head high the hips will slide further forward in a powerful upper body driven stroke. The traditional method has been outdated at an elite level for sprint athletes for years now.

Interestingly butterfly is going the other way and they are trying to stay as flat as possible, no body dolphins or undulations which cause drag. Even the terminology is deliberately changing, the kick is commonly referred to as a 'double leg kick' not 'dolphin kick' to get people out that mindset.

I still think there is a place for low sleek streamlined breaststroke, you still see it in the longer distance races and particularly in individual medley where energy conservation is important. Plus what the elites do isn't necessarily relevant to the masses.
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  #3  
Old 09-28-2016
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Zenturtle
Default

29 strokes for the second 50 m. What a crazy stroke. But its fast.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_mfkw5OFR4
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  #4  
Old 01-24-2017
ScoopUK
 
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Been watching some more breaststroke videos as now we are in the winter off season I am trying to improve strokes other than freestyle and enjoying playing around...

In this video you can see Kevin Cordes (USA: Lane 6) with a really long elegant stroke. It's beautiful to watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZdmboO94tk
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  #5  
Old 01-30-2017
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoopUK View Post
Been watching some more breaststroke videos as now we are in the winter off season I am trying to improve strokes other than freestyle and enjoying playing around...

In this video you can see Kevin Cordes (USA: Lane 6) with a really long elegant stroke. It's beautiful to watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZdmboO94tk
As I was watching this video, I was reminded of a story Terry once told of practicing with a masters group while he was travelling. At one point, one of the other swimmers approached him and asked "How can you be keeping up with us? You don't seem to be doing anything!" Compared with the other swimmers, Cordes definitely doesn't seem to be doing anything. His stroke is living proof that extending stroke length is as valid in breaststroke as it is in freestyle.

Thanks for sharing!


Bob
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  #6  
Old 01-30-2017
liolio
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoopUK View Post
Been watching some more breaststroke videos as now we are in the winter off season I am trying to improve strokes other than freestyle and enjoying playing around...

In this video you can see Kevin Cordes (USA: Lane 6) with a really long elegant stroke. It's beautiful to watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZdmboO94tk
Indeed pretty incredible gliding /streamline. he achieves the second place with possibly the slowest stroke rate of all 8 swimmers.

one thing he shares with Peaty is the extremely clean "exit" of the water when breathing, I suspect their is a fine technical thing behind it.
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  #7  
Old 01-31-2017
ScoopUK
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liolio View Post
Indeed pretty incredible gliding /streamline. he achieves the second place with possibly the slowest stroke rate of all 8 swimmers.
His kick isn't all that narrow either. Often breaststrokers talk about keeping their knees close together and using more the lower leg and turned out feet but whatever he is doing is working for him very well. He gets back to streamline very quickly compared to the high-out-the-water guys.

I particularly like breaststroke for the variety in stroke that you see. You got the powerful front end man-mountains like Peaty, Van De Burgh etc then you got the smaller framed rear end driven folk. Some have wide kicks, some have narrow. Some have a very wide powerful outsweep, some tight and short.

I realised by accident I was actually swimming the same or faster pace breaststroke when I relaxed my stroke and was doing my cool down. Instead of applying loads of torque at the front end which lifted my body up I would do a small outsweep just to take a lazy easy breath then sink bank into streamline and by not kicking so aggressively I would catch the water better with my feet. Seeing the tiles whizzing past for less effort was a lightbulb moment.

What I hope is that the powerful stroke (and physiques) we see today isn't shamed tomorrow in the same way that in the cycling world high cadence cycling became vogue (which works very well if you have a non-naturally enhanced ability to carry oxygen in your blood). Thankfully the swimming world seems to be holding up to the additional scrutiny of historic anti-doping re-tests. It's more the athletics and weight lifting scene that is getting embarrassed.
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