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  #21  
Old 10-07-2009
terry terry is offline
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Originally Posted by haschu33 View Post
Terry, I think I owe you a beer. Maybe two, even.
Whenever I get in the US again...
I think it would be more fun -- and result in quaffing a more exotic brew -- if I collected that debt in Germany . . . which is where you are, right?

Here's a thought. You mentioned earlier that you lack a sense of rhythm. I'd suggest you try a few 25s on which you swim "too fast" and see what happens. I'd be curious.

1) At the end of a typical practice of drills, etc. leave time for several 25s. Do the 1st just short of sprint speed. Not all out, but maybe 98%. Count your strokes. Estimate your "mojo" - a mix of ease and flow.
2) Reduce that effort by 10% and measure SPL and mojo again.
3) Continue with 10% reduction until you feel you've optimized.

We do something like this at the end of many workshops now and find it's been helpful to liberate people from being overly cautious or mechanical. It's emotionally liberating too.

Let us know how it goes.
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May your laps be as happy as mine.

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  #22  
Old 10-07-2009
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
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Cool Still amazed...

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Originally Posted by terry View Post
I think it would be more fun -- and result in quaffing a more exotic brew -- if I collected that debt in Germany . . . which is where you are, right?
Yes, and yes - to collect that in Germany, and which is where I am. This country is full of exotic brews, true. Just let me know, when you are coming...

I don't want to make such a big deal out of me being able to swim a lap in freestyle, cause it happens to everyone who learns it. Nevertheless I was quite surprised with my swimming this morning, so I'd like to remark this:

1. I am a little stuck in my drills and Terry gives me the advice, to, basically, extend my drill to the point where I don't have control anymore. Next visit to the pool and I swim whole strokes an entire lap - quite amazing.
2. It was not, that I had done before sequences of 3 strokes , or 10 strokes, or anything, I was only doing Zen-Switches, never any 'real' stroke. Means: very, very slow motion recovering the arm, place it in front of the head, stop flutter kicks, do a switch, wait for a while, flutter kicks, same thing other side.
I simple never did a normal timed stroke before, which I then extended to more of them. And then I do it for the first time and it becomes an entire lap. That also is quite amazing to me.
3. I did not liberately planned, or intended to do that. I just pushed of the wall, and it was more that it happened, then me doing anything. That also is amazing.

Anyway, as Terry's advice seems to be gold, I'll also take this to heart. Still:

Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
... leave time for several 25s. Do the 1st just short of sprint speed
Your sprint speed ? :-) I just did my first stumbling lap of whole strokes and you talk about sprint speed ?

Ok, you are the boss, I'll follow that advice and keep you informed.

Thanks a lot!

Last edited by haschu33 : 10-07-2009 at 07:20 PM.
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  #23  
Old 07-15-2010
madinjapan madinjapan is offline
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Default TI TI, live and let die/live

It's been a while since I've posted. And the reason I do so is something my wife said to me the other day. As the original title of my post insinuated, I became better at freestyle by simply watching Terry on youtube and his DVD. This is still true today more than ever. I'm still drill shy and can confess that I haven't performed a single one since my original post. Admittedly, I have suggested to a few other people that they try the superman glide, sweet spot and pushing your buoy positions, as I consider these the most invaluable to feeling 'at one' with the water.

"Are you image training again", is actually what my wife said to me, as she caught me watching perpetual motion for the upteenth time. It struck me then that I'm always better after watching it. I've tried to convince myself that I don't need Terry anymore (sorry mate) - but it's just not true. For me, image training is exactly how things work in the natural/real world. As children this is how we absorb information most effectively, right back to learning how to chuck a spear at some neolithic beasty.

I'm a language teacher and through experience I know that the first two skills to learn are listening and speaking respectively, you can transliterate this into TI speak as, first watch someone swim well and then practice what you see. You can break each aspect of someone swimming well into digestable segments, but to really become a 10th Dan master you need to imitate, and if you are lucky or naturally adept, emulate.

Case in point, I recently took a holiday and didn't go to the pool for 2 weeks. Prior to going I'd swam a personal best of 5km in the pool; again boredom rather than tiredness dragging me out of the pool and into the Jacuzzi. On my return, I headed down to the pool thinking all would be well. But shock, horror I struggled to achieve a meagre 2km. I was livid with myself. I'd always believed that once you become good at something you should be able to maintain that level of ability - fitness aside. Let's consider the bicycle for example; 2 weeks off a bike and you would still be tearing it up left, right and centre. Aha! A bike is on land. The feeling of something solid! The natural feeling for a human body.

There are horses for courses, and everyone without exception will have a slighty different swimming style, akin to human fingerprints. They may look the same but there are subtle differences. Swimming well is a state of mind, once you have conquered the fear of floating, breathing etc..

My advice (take it or leave it, because I'm always my own worst critic) is to never stop watching someone swim well. Always go back to the image training; and I'll go out on a limb and say this applies to drills as well. You will never get it, unless you continously watch someone doing it well.

If you have read this thread you will know I come from a breaststroke background. This video gave me goosebumps and has inspired to dispense with my 2 year obession with freestyle and mix it up again...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La1xK6EzLwI

P.S. On a side note, tripets have been born and are all doing well. 2 boys (Dylan and Joshua) and a girl (Embrace).

P.P.S. Have mentioned to the wife that I may want an endless pool installed in the garden!
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  #24  
Old 07-16-2010
terry terry is offline
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Madinj...
There's a lengthy and interesting post I could make on the visual aspects of learning, but I don't have time for that tonight - it's my bed time. However just wanted to say congratulations on the new additions to your family. Your daughter is the first Embrace I've ever heard of. It's a wonderful name.
Was tripets a typo or pun?
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  #25  
Old 08-12-2010
casual_swimmer casual_swimmer is offline
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Originally Posted by madinjapan View Post
"Are you image training again", is actually what my wife said to me, as she caught me watching perpetual motion for the upteenth time.
haha! I do that too. Even though I have lost count of the number of times I have watched it, I still see some new nuance or other when watching. I am stuck on the switch right now so next session I am going to just watch the switch drills and practice that one thing. Oh, and superman glides too because they are my favourite.
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  #26  
Old 10-14-2010
madinjapan madinjapan is offline
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TI is like learning to fly (through water that is). Well, I have been coaching my first student/person I'm helping with their technique. And surprisingly I'm the one it seems to have helped more! I'm not sure of the process here but I guess actually hearing myself giving the advice I'm constantly trying to absorb is having the side benefit of imprinting it deeper into my subconscious.

With regards to the student (not sure I should use that word - should I be paying Terry a royalty?) she has also dramatically improved her technique as well. The person I'm helping is the au pair living with us to help take care of our triplets. She is from a coastal town in Italy and often talks lovingly of the sea and how she and her parents went swimming every morning. She showed me a picture of her house and it is literally a stone’s throw from the Adriatic. Having heard this I'd thought she’d be a ninja in the pool, but to my horror she swam as bad as I did when I first started out. She was out of breath after 50 metres and complained her arms were aching. The first time at the pool I left her to her own devices, but on our return I gave her a few helpful hints about balance, rotation, swimming calmly that is trying to be a peace with the water, relaxing the arms, and trying to forget about legs as propulsion devices. Within an hour she had been set on the TI path to Kaizen swimming. At least from above the water, it was like watching a different swimmer. She now realises she has a lot of things to unlearn and is committed to the TI way.

Okay another confession, she seemed like a natural sinker and her body line was at 45 degree angle in the water so I suggested she practice superman glide, and think of her lungs as the pivotal point of equilibrium. I even did a few to show her how (so I HAVE done a drill!) and it worked immediately. We then focused on arm recovery and entry because she was simply slapping them back into the water without any thought of streamlining. Again instance results.

So with regards to my own improvement, I hit a new record of 13 strokes for 25m, I feel a lot more slippery in the water and have reinforced my mental image of what I should be aiming for. It sounds rather like a cheesy self-help tape but I'd suggest to people struggling with any part of their TI swimming to vocalise it. Say to yourself out loud what it is you actually want to do and achieve.

For me balance is the absolute key to good swimming, superman glide is a super drill, what does everyone else think?

take care for now
madinjapan

Last edited by madinjapan : 10-14-2010 at 04:58 PM.
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  #27  
Old 10-14-2010
sinker sinker is offline
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Originally Posted by madinjapan View Post
Thank you for the replies,

The reason I'm sure it's an improvement in my technique, rather than fitness is that I originally began swimming to lose weight. Being from England we are taught breaststroke before anything else and this is what I did for a few months. I was swimming about 80 lengths of breaststroke quite easily and decided to throw in 2 lengths of front crawl every 9th and 10th stroke. I'd spend the next 6 lengths of breaststroke trying to get my breath back.

That's when I realised I was missing something and did a bit of research. I was always in awe of the folks that could endlessly glide up and down the pool without so much as a splash.

I know there is still alot of improvements to make to my technique and I wonder what the possibilities are for the future. The vanilla and chocolate sides refer to your natural side for breathing and the opposite one (doesn't terry mention them in his book?). At the same time I bought terry's book I also bought "The Essential Swimmer" by Steve Tarpinian. I loved the history section about the development of the front crawl but some of the things he was saying you should do i.e. elbow flexion and keeping it at a 90 degree angle just didnt seem humanly possible to me as a beginner.

In terms of strokes per 25m, I'm down to about 14 if I really concentrate. On average though I'm still at about 18 per length so lots of room for improvement. I have an overkick on my left leg in my two beat kick, which causes the occasional big splash.

I live in Yonago, on the west coast of Japan, population 150,000 (nearest big cities are Hiroshima and Osaka). My local pool is Kaike, which happens to be the birthplace of Triathlon in Japan (http://www.kaike-triathlon.com/). I'm toying with the idea of entering at some point. It's a huge commitment to training and not sure if I'll have the time, considering my wife and I have just found out she's having triplets!! Looks like im not the only one that's improved my swimming.
Madinjapan

http://www.kaike-triathlon.com/

On the home page of this link--first picture of yellow capped swimmers---were there great white sharks on the prowl there, or does it only appear so?
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  #28  
Old 10-15-2010
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madinjapan View Post
I have been coaching my first student/person I'm helping with their technique. And surprisingly I'm the one it seems to have helped more! I'm not sure of the process here but I guess actually hearing myself giving the advice I'm constantly trying to absorb is having the side benefit of imprinting it deeper into my subconscious.

With regards to the student (not sure I should use that word - should I be paying Terry a royalty?) she has also dramatically improved her technique as well. The person I'm helping is the au pair living with us to help take care of our triplets. She is from a coastal town in Italy
How multi-culti. An au pair from Italy, living with Brits(?) in Japan. Well I'm in your part of the world at the moment, having arrived Hong Kong last night. I'll be in Asia for the next month.

You've again illustrated a useful insight into TI learning. Previously in this thread, you've highlighted the importance of visual learning and the option of 'informal' learning -- i.e. without drills.

Now the benefit -- to the teacher as well as the student -- of teaching basics to someone else. I believe the reasons are (1) it forces you to crystallize your own concepts and develop language to convey them; and (2) your observation of how your student responds to your instruction -- where and why they succeed, and what challenges them.

I would love to encourage others to do this and a blog with some details of your experience would be a good way.
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Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story

Last edited by terry : 10-15-2010 at 03:13 AM.
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  #29  
Old 10-15-2010
madinjapan madinjapan is offline
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Originally Posted by sinker View Post
Madinjapan

http://www.kaike-triathlon.com/

On the home page of this link--first picture of yellow capped swimmers---were there great white sharks on the prowl there, or does it only appear so?
There are sharks in those waters. I've seen a relatively small one in the port while fishing, but there aren't any big ones around. I was looking at the picture and couldn't really make out what you were referring to.
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  #30  
Old 10-16-2010
sinker sinker is offline
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Originally Posted by madinjapan View Post
There are sharks in those waters. I've seen a relatively small one in the port while fishing, but there aren't any big ones around. I was looking at the picture and couldn't really make out what you were referring to.
Sorry, bad joke I guess. To me they appeared to be a mob of people thrashing around in all directions in a panic.
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