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  #31  
Old 11-22-2017
Tom Pamperin Tom Pamperin is offline
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Cathy,

that's great news indeed. TI swimming has been such a good part of my life that I'd hate to see anyone not able to pursue it for physical reasons. Whatever the reason, I'm glad you figured out your breathing issue for now.
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  #32  
Old 11-22-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Nice going, Cathy. I was certain that your problem was not due to some intrinsic anatomical peculiarity, but was one mostly of perception and lack of positive experience. It will only continue to get better after this.

Mind you, there is no certainty that it will continue to improve in a straight line. In fact, if you find one day that you've surprisingly forgotten how to do the things you did so well the day before, don't worry, that's normal. But those off days will get fewer and fewer if you keep practicing, and the days that you improve still further will keep on happening. It's like magic!
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  #33  
Old 11-22-2017
whoiscathy
 
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Ooooh, now I want to have a bow wave :D
I laughed so hard!

I think I'll start making my own bow wave in about two weeks' time, I hope, because now I can't wait to have my very own bow wave :D

_______
I'll go play with my slot-to-skate now. ATM I'm overrotating in skate and my head is a bit too low in the end, so, no potential bow wave :D
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  #34  
Old 11-22-2017
novaswimmer novaswimmer is offline
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'...the issue at hand is that you are not able to plug your nasal passage and thus the difference in pressure outside in the water and inside your body is forcing the water to go up your nose...'

But when you exhale, you do not plug your nasal passage at all. You are exhaling and creating an air pressure that will exceed that of the surrounding water.

'...there seems to be no trickle valve on my nose....'

When I exhale underwater, I regulate the flow rate by a combination of my diaphragm and the back of my throat (pharynx) -- the area that initiates swallowing. I don't know what you are referring to when you say 'trickle valve'.

If you have ever sung loudly and softly or yelled and whispered, then you know that the volume of sound is regulated by your diaphragm. Same thing with breathing.

Last edited by novaswimmer : 11-23-2017 at 06:17 PM.
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  #35  
Old 11-22-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by novaswimmer View Post

'...there seems to be no trickle valve on my nose....'

When I exhale underwater, I regulate the flow rate by a combination of my diaphragm and the back of my throat (pharynx). I don't know what you are referring to when you say 'trickle valve'.
She is referring to my earlier comment in which I referred to the soft palate (velum) structures as the naso-pharyngeal valve mechanism to the nose cavity which can be opened or closed, one way to stop or regulate air escaping from the lungs, in addition to closing the mouth. That's where she derived the "trickle-valve" terminology. I neglected to mention the closing of the larynx/voicebox/glottis which is the other way of blocking or regulating air escaping from the lungs.

Perhaps it didn't help that I tried not to use the technically correct term for these valve like structures, but what I was trying to get at was that the most efficient way to regulate the slow trickle of air was to completely open all these valve mechanisms, and to modulate the flow by a controlled relaxed emptying of the lungs allowing passive recoil of the stretched structures (muscles, ligaments and other soft tissues) enclosing the lungs, rather than forcing the compressed air from the lungs against partially opened laryngeal and naso-pharyngeal valve mechanisms.

Last edited by sclim : 11-22-2017 at 07:02 PM.
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  #36  
Old 11-22-2017
whoiscathy
 
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No, it was a weak attempt at a joke :)
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  #37  
Old 11-23-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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OK, got it :)

Just to illustrate the back and forth of progress, I just got back from swimming. I have made progress of sorts in that I can sustain an improved strokes per length count for a full 100m now at my tempo trainer setting of 1.40 sec. But on repeats with limited recovery time, this improvement wears out somewhat. When I get fatigued, everything goes to pot. At this point I start breathing funny, grunting, tensing my body and rushing my stroke, which is shorthand for losing my balance and flailing.

Trying to concentrate on one thing at a time, I focussed on breathing calmly and smoothly, partly got back my breathing mojo, but only partly. It wasn't completely relaxed in the chest, but at least it was controlled smoothly through the nose and slowly exhaled until the next inhalation. Once this was achieved, the flailing improved somewhat, so all parts seem to be partly connected, but not completely.
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  #38  
Old 11-23-2017
whoiscathy
 
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I had zero issues with breathing today. Rather, I didn't notice I had any issues except when I was trying to copy a flip turn. OK, that was dumb :)
But I understand what you mean. I don't expect linear progress.

My coach understands my need for my very own bow wave and told me we'd start to make one not next lesson, but right after. Maybe I'll drown then :)
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