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  #1  
Old 03-31-2012
arunks arunks is offline
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Default Is this the ideal Hand Entry?

Is this the ideal or effective way to enter hands for the pull as mentioned in this article? When factors such as drag, speed, .. are considered, what do you think?

Last edited by arunks : 03-31-2012 at 06:19 AM.
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Old 03-31-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Originally Posted by arunks View Post
Is this the ideal or effective way to enter hands for the pull as mentioned in this article? When factors such as drag, speed, .. are considered, what do you think?
I think if you compare this to what Terry / Total Immersion teaches they are nearly identical outcomes.
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  #3  
Old 04-01-2012
arunks arunks is offline
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I saw Terry speaking in on of the posts saying "The optimal way to maximize propulsion while minimizing work is Enter through the Mail Slot, then Extend at shallower angle."
I think the the extension at a shallower angle is important because it leads to better balance, less drag and greater propulsion forward.

Last edited by arunks : 04-01-2012 at 08:22 AM.
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Old 04-01-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arunks View Post
I saw Terry speaking in on of the posts saying "The optimal way to maximize propulsion while minimizing work is Enter through the Mail Slot, then Extend at shallower angle."
I think the the extension at a shallower angle is important because it leads to better balance, less drag and greater propulsion forward.
SO this is the same as or different than the diagram? Shallower angle than what?
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  #5  
Old 04-02-2012
arunks arunks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
SO this is the same as or different than the diagram? Shallower angle than what?
I think its different.In the diagram they spear steep but continue deep, steeply angled downward rather than ending up with a more horizontal extended arm .

Last edited by arunks : 04-02-2012 at 12:38 PM.
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Old 04-02-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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YOu need to find the angle that allows you to remain balanced (keep the hips up), avoid stress on the shoulder joint from being too horizontal, and allow you to develop an adequate catch without stress on the rotator cuff or wasted motion.

I honestly don't think there is any significant difference with the diagram linked and with what is being taught at the majority of TI clinics.
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Fresh Freestyle

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  #7  
Old 04-06-2012
sinker sinker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arunks View Post
Is this the ideal or effective way to enter hands for the pull as mentioned in this article? When factors such as drag, speed, .. are considered, what do you think?
Regarding the three picture panels at the bottom of this link: Perhaps it should be pointed out it is inaccurate TI-wise due to the lack of a patient lead arm (front quadrant swimming). She is more than halfway through her stroke before her recovering arm contacts the water.
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  #8  
Old 04-06-2012
RodHavriluk RodHavriluk is offline
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Default To achieve an effective arm entry

As the author of the technique tip linked above, I am compelled to elaborate on what it takes to achieve an effective arm entry in freestyle.

Most swimmers complete the arm entry in a very ineffective position - with the arm parallel to the surface. This position guarantees wasted time (a slower stroke rate), poor leverage (lower force), and unnecessary shoulder stress (often resulting in injury). (All three limitations have been well-documented in research.)

A hand entry angle of 30o with respect to the body results in an effective arm position that doesn’t waste time, has better leverage, and less shoulder stress.

It requires a conscious effort to maintain a downward angle on the hand entry to achieve an effective arm position. (As soon as the hand enters the water, the natural tendency is to let the increased resistance change the entry angle.) Initially, it is rare that a swimmer sufficiently exaggerates the entry angle. It usually requires asking swimmers to “risk making too severe of an entry angle” to maintain a steep enough angle to achieve an effective arm position.

A swimmer can evaluate their arm position at the completion of the entry. If the head is effectively positioned with the water level at the hairline and the vision directed forward at 45o, the swimmer can see the hand as the deepest part of the arm. If the swimmer is not positive that the hand is deeper than the elbow and the elbow is deeper than the shoulder, the entry angle was not steep enough.

Instructing a swimmer to enter with a shallow angle will result in the typical, ineffective arm position at the completion of the entry.

Bottom line: if you want to swim faster, take a look at your hand entry angle.

Rod Havriluk, Ph.D.
Swimming Technology Research
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  #9  
Old 05-04-2012
RodHavriluk RodHavriluk is offline
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Check the recently posted article on the Swimming World website for more information about the freestyle arm entry. Figures 3 and 4 compare typical and effective technique. Medical Concerns
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  #10  
Old 05-05-2012
che9194 che9194 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RodHavriluk View Post
A hand entry angle of 30o with respect to the body results in an effective arm position that doesn’t waste time, has better leverage, and less shoulder stress.
This can't possibly be true as nearly all elite swimmers enter at much less than a 30 degree angle. I am sure that it is unique to each swimmer and depends on many factors including flexibility, strength, balance, extent of EVF, etc.

I like (and have successfully used) the advice for finding and imprinting the depth of your target for the lead hand given in the Six Week Intermediate program. They recommend that as you skate, lower your hand 3 – 6 inches at a time and see if your hips feel lighter and higher. Then start bringing it back up until you feel your hips sinking. Just before they sink is your target (they point out that the target will change over time).
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