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  #1  
Old 11-02-2011
caasen123 caasen123 is offline
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Location: Minneapolis/St Paul
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caasen123
Default Video Stroke analysis...input requested

I shot this video a couple of weeks ago and since then I have worked on keeping me head more inline with my body and not coming out of the water so much. The other issue I think I have is not keeping my right hand in front of me long enough during my breathing stroke/side. My question is should I practice Bi-lateral breathing or work on my balance to correct this? Or is there some other skill/drill that I should focus on to correct this.

Also if there are any other deficiency's someone sees please point them out with some suggestions on correcting the problem.

My swimming mostly revolves around racing in triathlons so I am not concerned with really fast sprinting or perfectly smooth splash free swimming. I want to get from point a to point b efficiently and as quickly as possible.

Thanks in advance,
caasen
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  #2  
Old 11-02-2011
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caasen123 View Post
My swimming mostly revolves around racing in triathlons so I am not concerned with really fast sprinting or perfectly smooth splash free swimming. I want to get from point a to point b efficiently and as quickly as possible.

Thanks in advance,
caasen
Why not focus on smooth splash free swimming? Anything that causes waves or splash will also make you slow down. You don't need to succumb to the thougth process of most (uninformed) triathlon coaches regarding swimming. have you seen the videos of Terry competing in the SF bay open water masters championship? He's surrounded by splashing swimmers and yet he's as smooth as silk. I had the opportunity to watch Terry in the mass start of the La Jolla roughwater swim. There were several hundred starters and he was fairly easy to pick out as his strokes remained long and smooth.

I'll watch the video shortly and post some comments.
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  #3  
Old 11-02-2011
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
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Pretty good! You have a fairly well developed "Swinger" technique, which should serve you well for triathlon swimming. You might want to read more about "Swingers" on a competing swimming website.

I don't think that you need to make major changes. There is a risk that trying to develop a patient lead hand (trying to convert to a more front quadrant technique) will undo your already successful technique.

Better that you focus on keeping your head down when breathing -- laser beam focus.

Since you already have good technique, why not schedule an advanced lesson or two with Coach Dave Cameron?

http://www.totalimmersion.net/learn-ti/298

Take advantage of having an expert in your community.

Good luck,
RadSwim
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  #4  
Old 11-03-2011
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Originally Posted by RadSwim View Post

I don't think that you need to make major changes. There is a risk that trying to develop a patient lead hand (trying to convert to a more front quadrant technique) will undo your already successful technique.
I agree major changes not needed, but learning to manipulate the timing of his stroke with a more patient lead hand can have a lot of advantages for this swimmer. "Staying long for longer" will help him decrease drag in the water for a longer portion of his stroke. keepign a longer bodyline for more of the stroke will aid in his balance and help get & keep his hips up.

A more relaxed recovery will help ease stress on the shoulder joitn and also imrpove balance as he gets rid of the "chicken wing" created behind is back. This in turn will help him get that arm back into the water sooner so taht the patient lead arm can take a stroke with the swimmer in streamlined position.

The value of the "swim types" is that it also can help quickly identify the fixes or improvements for the swimmer to work on...not so they can stay that type. Of course, as your eye for swimming continues to improve you'll be able to identify the fixes needed without having to label the rest of the swimmers stroke.
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Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

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  #5  
Old 11-03-2011
caasen123 caasen123 is offline
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caasen123
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Thank you Radswim and CoachSuzanne!

The relaxed recovery is an excellent suggestion and something I completely overlooked. I had no idea of the various "Labels" that have been defined for swim types, interesting indeed. I suspect some of my swinger habits have been developed from alot of open water swimming in a wetsuit. Getting back to the pool in the fall I tend to feel heavy and need to spin my arms faster to stay buoyant.
I will be scheduling some lessons with Coach Dave to clean up some of the details of my stroke and tap into his impressive endurance resume later this winter.

Thanks for the input, it is much appreciated!
Craig Aasen
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