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  #1  
Old 08-12-2011
DVLAswim DVLAswim is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 12
DVLAswim
Default Any suggestions on ways to improve?

I just posted my first TI video and I hope there are a few generous, swimming souls on the forum who could offer me their advice. Here is the link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4cN4Ml6eLA

The first half of the video is shot above water and the second part captures all the action below the waterline. We're still figuring out how to keep a swimmer in frame and keep the camera from bouncing around too much. My apologies in advance for our Blair Witch camerawork.

Thanks for taking a peek and sharing your thoughts.
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  #2  
Old 08-12-2011
Burger Burger is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2011
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Burger
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Overotation? especially when you breath? almost 90 degrees from the ideal 45 degrees.

the resulting deep spear after that too.

Just my .02 cents
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  #3  
Old 08-12-2011
afbcpa afbcpa is offline
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afbcpa
Default Quiet Down The Kick

Comparing you to Terry's Self Taught video , it seems like you can quiet down the kick/lower body and streamline it more. Allowing your legs to just glide after the 2 beat. Of course, we can all work on balance. I like your stroke, what a great improvement from your initial (before) TI swimming. Way to go!!!

Tony
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  #4  
Old 08-12-2011
CoachBillG CoachBillG is offline
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Here are a couple of tips from what I seen in the video.

Great job in teaching yourself!! I see very good horizontal body position and a nice relaxed technique! Congratulations on your progress.

Let's try to make freestyle a little easier for you :-)

1. You are slightly over rotated. You can correct this by focusing on how your arm comes back to your thigh after the "catch". Maintain the water line over the elbow (keep the elbow in the water). Instead of pulling the elbow out, throwing you towards your back, once the arm comes back, swing it outwards. You can work on that in skating and zen skating drills. This is like a "default" to prevent over rotation.

2. Your kick is slightly off. Sometimes you nailed it and sometimes you missed. This had to do with the fact that you are over rotating and your legs and hips stack up.
For the 2 beat kick it is opposite leg, opposite spearing:
Left kick / Right arm entry
Right kick / left arm entry

It is opposite leg, opposite arm because the leg kicking down drives that hip up, which drives the opposite hip down. Combine that with the opposite arm entering (spearing the water) makes for a very powerful movement, without actually using a lot of physical exertion.

3. The head...your head is following your recovery arm when it enters the water after you breathe. Right before the arm enters the water, re-position your head to look downward prior to the arm spearing the water. Think about trying to make your breathing stroke to mimic your non breathing stroke.

4. Your head is a little buried in the water, especially when the arm spears the water after you breathe. You might want to shift your eyes slightly forward as this might straighten you neck better and bringing the top of the cap slightly out of the water, which is what you want.

This is plenty to focus on for a while.

Keep us posted on your progress!

Best,
Bill Garelick
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  #5  
Old 08-12-2011
mattcon mattcon is offline
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mattcon
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Looks very good to me, especially in contrast to the "before" phase which had some fundamental problems. For your camera work, I would vote against walking and filming at the same time--wipes out the details for viewing. The only significant thing I can mention is that it looks like you are dropping your elbow on your pull, where instead you want to have a "high elbow." The high elbow is a well-known concept if you're not familiar and there are many who can explain it. Basically as seen from the side, as you catch and start to pull, you want you pulling hand to drop down while your elbow remains up so that it looks like your arm is hugging the side of a barrel as it rolls under the length of your body. This is called "swimming over a barrel." Right now, your elbow is dropping down with your hand and leading it towards your feet. Much less efficient. Regarding head position, I would recommend pointing the top of your head straight ahead in the direction you want to go. Otherwise, I would work on staying straight and streamlined and I expect the other things in your stroke to work themselves out as you practice.

Matt
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  #6  
Old 08-13-2011
DVLAswim DVLAswim is offline
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DVLAswim
Default Wow!

I really appreciate all of you taking the time to help me see what is going on in my stroke. I can see how my tunnel vision on a couple aspects of my stroke has lead to a sort of cloak of invisibility for me in other areas. Thanks for helping me gain insight into what I am actually doing in the water. Thanks too, for not just pointing out what I've been missing but for offering some great advice on how to correct the problems.

Since I live in Korea and TI coaching hasn't quite 'arrived' here yet, I've had to go with my best guess as to whether or not I've been getting things right. I see now, I should have conned a friend into coming down to the pool to film me much earlier.

Once I've gotten a bit of time to integrate your insights into my practice, I'll post another video.

Swimming, what an adventure!

(And of course if anyone else would like to chime in please do. I've already gotten so much more advice than I had any right to expect, but it's okay to be greedy when it comes to swim advice, right?)

Seth
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  #7  
Old 08-13-2011
mattcon mattcon is offline
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mattcon
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You're very welcome. As another point, I would suggest comparing your video with that of Shin Takeuchi on YouTube and of course with Terry to see where you're the same and where you're different and how they compare to each other so you can see what is individual and what is essential. For that matter, you can also look at videos of Michael Phelps doing easy swimming. At that pace, he is pure TI.

In addition, once you get more comfortable with the stroke, you might start rotating more decisively with the hips. Looking at Shin's video, for example, you see that while he is gliding very smoothly, his hips are not rolling at a constant rate. He starts with a quick acceleration from one side to the other. This will not only help you go faster, but from a technical point of view might start flushing out parts of your stroke that are less efficient and help you find what moves you through the water.

Matt
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  #8  
Old 08-13-2011
KenW KenW is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Irvine, CA
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KenW
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Congratulations on your progress. I was quite proud when I reached this milestone.

Based on my understanding of the swim stroke, my thoughts are mostly what Bill wrote. Beyond that, I'd like to add my best mileage to advance my stroke past where yours is right now has been working on balance. It wasn't that long ago when my body position in the water looked more like yours. Let's call that butt dragging at about 10 degrees below horizontal. I'm now probably at 3 degrees below horizontal, and I picked up considerable efficiency with the improved body position. Plus, my stroke looks closer to Shinji's. To get here, I've done a ton of spear switch drills focusing on my body position. I noticed you are losing balance in the water when you taking your breaths, and it looks as if you are reaching your head for breath. During these drills I would suggest also working your balance in the water while breathing. Maybe take two or three breaths in the water all the while trying to keep your body balance very quiet and trying to expose as little of your face as possible. For me, I had to very mindful of where my head was in space while taking the breath. Even with being completely mindful of it, it was more of a process for me than something that clicked immediately. I now get comments from fellow swimmers that it is hard for them to tell when I am breathing. This tickles me pink.

Note that I too am trying to figure out what I need to do to improve. Take what I am saying with a grain of salt given I'm not what I would call an accomplished TI swimmer. I think I have been doing TI drills for cumulatively a year.

Last edited by KenW : 08-13-2011 at 09:46 PM.
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