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  #1  
Old 02-19-2009
gogglesnoseplugs gogglesnoseplugs is offline
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Default Sweet Spot

I am having difficulty finding my sweet spot. I lay on my back, and either one of two things happen; my feet sink deep into the water or my face submerges if I try to compensate for my feet. I tried this drill using the pool gutter moving to floating on my own, and I simply cannot find that sweet spot that is spoken of. I know finding my sweet spot is important in my swimming improvement. Any suggestions?
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  #2  
Old 02-19-2009
ny1301 ny1301 is offline
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I learned TI backstroke first, so I did not have this problem. I suggest you start looking TI backstroke, which is easier and will help your freestyle also.
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  #3  
Old 02-20-2009
Adam Adam is offline
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You can make your legs float back up by countering them with your upper body. At sweet spot, one of your shoulders is submerged. Make sure you entire body is rotated so all the it's not just the shoulder that's submerged, but the whole side of your body.

Try to imagining a stick going through your body - from your head all the way through your spine (I know the spine isn't straight, but for the sake of visualization, let's assume it is). Sort of like you're some sort of shish kebab.



The problem I initially had was that I was trying to get one side of my body to rotate out of the water, without countering this with rotation from the other side of the body. I now think it's much more helpful to think of the side of the body that rotates into the water. Doing this also means your head stays stationary.
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Old 02-21-2009
gogglesnoseplugs gogglesnoseplugs is offline
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Thanks for all the insights. The imagery of a kabob shined some light on how I might think. After some more practice, I am still having problems though. Panic sets in the minute I finally get level enough to rotate one shoulder and hip up, and my head sinks. I suppose at this time I just need more practice.
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  #5  
Old 02-26-2009
gogglesnoseplugs gogglesnoseplugs is offline
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I am still having difficulty maintaing balance after several more attempts. I wonder if my swimsuit might be a factor in this; I am wearing a standard short-type suit which flaps around. Should I try a Speedo-type suit?
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  #6  
Old 02-26-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gogglesnoseplugs View Post
I am still having difficulty maintaining balance after several more attempts. I wonder if my swimsuit might be a factor in this; I am wearing a standard short-type suit which flaps around. Should I try a Speedo-type suit?
The suit makes a big difference in ones ability to move forward. Tight is good. A suit will tend to feel tighter when you try it on dry, for some reason. It might even feel OK in the water until you try to move.

I was told by an online retailer that when a person's size is in between a standard size, they recommend the next *smaller* size to avoid excess drag. For the first time, I'm going to go with that advice.

As far as fabric goes, I would recommend polyester or polyester/PBT. Chlorine won't eat it and cause it to fade as fast as it will to Spandex.

Oh, the more skin in direct contact with the water, the better you might be able to sense drag and movement.
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  #7  
Old 02-27-2009
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gogglesnoseplugs View Post
I am having difficulty finding my sweet spot. I lay on my back, and either one of two things happen; my feet sink deep into the water or my face submerges if I try to compensate for my feet...
It sounds as if you may be arching your back to try to get your feet up. Press back on the shoulder blades, but keep the neck neutral. Kick lightly, then roll just enough to get one side of your body out of the water, only about 5 degrees or so.
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  #8  
Old 02-28-2009
gogglesnoseplugs gogglesnoseplugs is offline
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Thanks Rhoda...
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  #9  
Old 02-28-2009
naj naj is offline
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When I work on sweet-spot and some other drills I use fins because my kick is weak this can also help you, at least I've found I to help.
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  #10  
Old 03-02-2009
LBRoberts LBRoberts is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gogglesnoseplugs View Post
I am having difficulty finding my sweet spot. I lay on my back, and either one of two things happen; my feet sink deep into the water or my face submerges if I try to compensate for my feet. I tried this drill using the pool gutter moving to floating on my own, and I simply cannot find that sweet spot that is spoken of. I know finding my sweet spot is important in my swimming improvement. Any suggestions?
It sounds like you might have a problem with balance which becomes more pronounced when you try sweet spot. I'd recommend (and I'm not a TI coach but here's my 2 penneth!) just trying to focus on balance for now. I suggest you try lying on your back, arms by your sides, and kicking with a very gentle kick (flick of the ankles nice and slowly) with small fins if needs be. (try this on your bed at home (without the fins) to get yourself into the right position and practice your head being in neutral)

maybe try doing a few widths concentrating on each of the following focal points until you have them mastered:

1. having your body in a completely neutral position with no arching of the back, neck or head. everything should be completely straight just as when you lie on your bed at home looking at the ceiling.

2. leaning into the water (head still neutral - looking directly upwards) so your hips come close to the surface

If you can take a friend to the pool with you, he/she will be able to give you feedback on your body position above/under water. It's amazing that you can sometimes think your body is in one position when it's not. If needed, the friend can manually support your body into the right position so you know what it "feels" like and then let you practice.

This might seem like a "basic" drill but in my experience, people who absolutely master this; will then master all the othger drills (and then full swimming) far quicker. So it's worth spending weeks or a month just mastering this if needs be.

When you've completely mastered this, you'll know what balance feels like

And then it's time to move to sweet spot

As I say, a proper TI coach might be able to offer better advice but that's my thoughts

Laurie
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