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Old 12-20-2012
grandall grandall is offline
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Default 2012 Two Mile Cable Swim-Lake Placid

Terry-Hope your memeory is still fresh- Having competed in the one mile cable swim at the same event I was wondering how felt about your performance of the two mile swim.

Did you feel you were in your mojo(flow state) the whole time during the race?

What would you say your perceived exertion was during the race?
After the race did you feel untired or exhausted?

Do you credit your strategic practice sets played a major role in your performance?

Did you feel you had a perfect race or was there was something that you should have corrected or changed?
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Old 12-20-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandall View Post
Terry-Hope your memeory is still fresh- Having competed in the one mile cable swim at the same event I was wondering how felt about your performance of the two mile swim.

Did you feel you were in your mojo(flow state) the whole time during the race?

What would you say your perceived exertion was during the race?
After the race did you feel untired or exhausted?

Do you credit your strategic practice sets played a major role in your performance?

Did you feel you had a perfect race or was there was something that you should have corrected or changed?
Hey George,

You're questions are great debate starters.

1. Should we enter races if we are not prepared to give our all?

I've done a few 2 mile races this summer and every time finished with way too much gas left in the tank, not because I didn't want to try I just didn't have the pacing skills to get it just right so over compensated. Still my performance in those races showed me that I can easily cope with a race over 5K or 10K or more, whereas the guys I did the 3K races with thought it was a real limit pusher? and would rather go back to a mile. I'd like to get faster over a mile but would also like to be a swimmer who can look forward to a 10K on a regular basis. who got more out of the races this summer, me or my swimming buddies?


2. Can you give you're all and be so fit that you do not feel exhausted at the end? I would say yes, when you see olympic athletes interviewed just a minute or two after a race they look pretty recovered, especially the long distance ones. Phelps and Lochte sometimes had less than an hour between finals in the Olympics but they still gave their all so exhaustion doesn't really come in to it? I don't know.

3. Is it possible to race a 10K distance to the limit so that 10K is fine but 12K would be impossible?

You have engaged my curiosity, I look forward to Terry's reply to your original questions.
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Old 12-29-2012
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
Hey George,

You're questions are great debate starters.
Indeed they are. Sorry I missed them earlier.

Quote:
.1. Should we enter races if we are not prepared to give our all?
I used to allow ego to stand in my way and would not race -- pool or OW -- unless I felt fit enough to swim relatively fast. Also the concern that the TI Method itself might lose credibility if the Head Coach swam slowly. (Not an unfounded concern. Someone on "The Forum Suzanne Loves to Hate" capped a criticism of TI there by snorting that I "finished DFL" [Dead F__g Last] in the 2002 Manhattan Island Marathon Swim. I wondered if anyone else had ever been panned completing a 28.5-mile swim. For the record I finished 14 out of 16 soloists, but first among all those 50+, and also finished ahead of one relay. AND I'd done the event specifically to demonstrate that if you focused solely on economy, you could complete an ultra event on very ordinary training. But enough about that.)
In the event, since turning 60, and since experiencing a number of health-related situations that often compromise my ability to train, I've decided that even 'slow' races have value (1) because I enjoy seeing friends and being part of the environment; and (2) Even slow races give me specific info on where my current neural threshold is, which helps me target my training more accurately.

Quote:
Can you give your all and be so fit that you do not feel exhausted at the end?
I would have to separate my responses for pool vs. open water events. Pool races are unquestionably more draining. It takes me 7 to 10 minutes of recovery-pace swimming to get rid of waste products like lactic acid. After open water races, I seldom do a swim-down and feel just fine within a few minutes, standing on the beach -- even for a fairly intense 2 to 3 mile race. I think the difference is in the absence of pushoffs. Having to turn frequently in the pool brings the largest muscle groups -- glutes and hamstrings -- into play. They can generate a lot of lactic acid. Also the turns create aerobic distress.

Quote:
Is it possible to race a 10K distance to the limit so that 10K is fine but 12K would be impossible?.
Not in my experience. I don't swim 10k like the elites do. I do a carefully paced swim and - depending on the situation (am I in a race for place near the end) - I may finish with a really strong final 1k or just pick it up moderately in the final 200m. Were I in a 12k, I would simply swim the first 11k the same way as the first 9k in the shorter race. Either would feel quite sustainable.

To answer George's other questions. My last Betsy Owens 2-Mile was the most satisfying of that particular event (I've done it 6 or 7x, preceded by five years of swimming a mile cable swim when that was all they offered) -- and easily among the most satisfying races I've ever done. I did feel I had great mojo in it. And there's a highly specific mojo in that race--or any cable swim with similar conditions.
What was so satisfying was that last summer, my conditioning was well short of where I had been in my best-prepared summers. I had four weeks of highly successful races (finishing in top 10% of field in all) with Betsy being the fourth. I was confident I had the fitness to race well for a mile, or 25 minutes, but wondered if 2 miles would be stretching it.

It required a highly strategic and opportunistic approach to the race -- making maximum use of drafting, and being smart about how and when I would pass another swimmer and 'jump the gap' to my next drafting opportunity.

Racing skills of that sort are only acquired through experience, and having 10 or so years of racing the Betsy under my belt was invaluable.

The other part of the mojo in this race is closely related. The close-order and pack swimming of cable racing makes it unique in OW events. In other OW events the field disperses. In cable racing the entire field will be swimming, like a train, along the cable. Being in constant close proximity to other swimmers puts me in a state of high alertness that ONLY occurs in that sort of event. I find that intense concentration blissful beyond my ability to do justice in words.

It was the fact that I maintained my keenest focus for the entire 50m21s that, even 4+ months later, I thrill to recall it.

Betsy Owens 2013 will be Aug 17. Watch for info here.
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