Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Outside the Box: Open Water Swimming
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-17-2011
tpamperin tpamperin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 80
tpamperin
Default 10 Mile Swim--Am I Ready?

I'm thinking of doing a 10-mile swim this summer--I've never done an official course longer than the 2.4-mile Ironman Wisconsin (though I've done solo swims of 5-6 miles in training). I'd love it if some experienced folks would step in and share some advice about how to decide if you're ready for something like that.

Obviously, I have some time to prepare yet, but here's where I'm at now:

I swim 5 days per week, about 1 1/2 to 2 hours--maybe 10,000-12,000 yards. In a 25-yd pool I can swim a 7:30 500 at 14 SPL (a new PR for me today, actually), and I can consistently do 10 x 100 on 2:00 at 12-13 SPL, descending times from about 1:32 to 1:18 or so.

That's not much information to go on, but I really have no idea if I'm someone who should even be thinking about a 10-miler for this summer. What do you think? Is it a realistic goal or not?

Thanks,

Tom
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-17-2011
CoachJohnB's Avatar
CoachJohnB CoachJohnB is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 162
CoachJohnB
Default

Tom,

If you are holding 12-13 spl, speed ranging from 1:30-1:18 in Nov., with the goal of doing a 10 miler next summer, you will be more than ready to swim the distance.
A few suggestions that I have picked-up from friends that have done the Swim the Suck 10 miler(http://www.swimthesuck10mile.com/Site/Home.html) Yes, that is a shameless plug for my friend's event.
1) Gradually build-up to longer swims by time, not distance. Start with a 10 minute swim, then work up to a 20 and even 30 minute swim. Don't worry about the distance, just get use to swimming relaxed for longer period.
2) Practice hydrating and feeding stops. You should be taking water every 25-30 minutes. Food is dependent on your body's need but at least a little energy replacement once an hour but water 2-3 times an hour.
3) Find a buddy(ies) to do some open water swimming. You may have to wait until the water temps warm-up in the spring(depending on where you are located) but get use to not having walls to turn or rest after 25 yds. Plus, you need to practice sighthing both in front of you and using the shore to follow for the swim.
4) Contact Coach Dave for specific training ideas. He has done a number of LONG open water swims. He will be able to give you even more details about what to expect and how to prepare.

Good Luck!
John
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-17-2011
tpamperin tpamperin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 80
tpamperin
Default

John,

thanks for the advice. I actually have a session (my first formal training ever) with Coach Dave on Monday morning, and hope to continue training with him occasionally. It's nice to hear from someone else that my 10-mile goal isn't unrealistic. And Swim the Suck is one I'm considering (also the Kingdom Swim).

I'm in northern Idaho right now so open water will have to wait, but as soon as I can I'll try out your idea of adding progressively longer swims and practicing eating and drinking in the water--that'll be an entirely new dimension.

Should I plan, like running, to do one long swim per week, gradually increasing the distance? Or like ultra training, back-to-back long swims (Sat/Sun) so I can practice swimming long when my body is already fatigued?

I'd appreciate any thoughts on how to organize my training for long events like these--right now I'm assuming something like the paragraph above, adding in shorter open water sessions between weekends, with 1-2 pool sessions for technique and speed, but I'm not sure that's the best way. Thanks,

Tom
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-17-2011
CoachJohnB's Avatar
CoachJohnB CoachJohnB is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 162
CoachJohnB
Default

Tom,

If I were you, I would talk to Dave about to train in and out of the water for a 10 mile swim. He has a lot more experience in preparing for long swims than I do.
Dave is an expert on prepping people for those types of swims. I will tell you that the Swim the Suck is an awesome event(yes, I am bias toward the event because it is in my hometown and a longtime friend is the director) The swim follows the Tennessee River through the gorge, twisting and turning along with way. The fall is a beautiful time of year for the swim, with the leaves changing color. Plus, depending on what TVA does with the water level, the current will pull you along with it to the finish.

Good Luck. You are fortunate to have Dave working with you.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-17-2011
swim2Bfree swim2Bfree is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: N. California
Posts: 179
swim2Bfree
Default

I agree with most of what CoachJohnB says. However, you may find there are more effective feeding strategies than water every 25-30 and "food" every hour.

The most successful marathon swimmers (in my observation) tend to:
1. Rely almost exclusively on liquid carbohydrate drinks. They are easier to consume and digest while swimming than solid food.
2. Have water available, but only in case of gastric distress. Have "food" available, but only in case of cravings.
3. Feed more often - every 15-20 minutes. The goal is to minimize blood sugar fluctuations.

You might be able to get away with sub-optimal nutrition in Swim the Suck, which if the river is flowing might only be a 3-4 hour race. In a channel swim, though, nutrition will determine whether you finish or DNF.

That said, it's individual to some extent and you should do what works for you! The important thing is to practice it beforehand.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-17-2011
CoachJohnB's Avatar
CoachJohnB CoachJohnB is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 162
CoachJohnB
Default

Swim2b makes a good points that I didn't clarify that well with the "food" and water breaks. I agree, you should experiement well before the swim to see what your body needs to keep your levels up for the duration of the event.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-22-2011
KatieK KatieK is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Scottsdale, AZ, USA
Posts: 295
KatieK
Default

I'm doing Swim the Suck
__________________
KatieK
WaterGirl.co
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-22-2011
CoachJohnB's Avatar
CoachJohnB CoachJohnB is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 162
CoachJohnB
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieK View Post
I'm doing Swim the Suck
You will have fun. Karah and her crew are a great group. She and I swim together a lot of mornings. If I am in town the weekend of the 2012 swim, I will probably help out.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-16-2011
naj naj is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 624
naj
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachJohnB View Post
You will have fun. Karah and her crew are a great group. She and I swim together a lot of mornings. If I am in town the weekend of the 2012 swim, I will probably help out.
CoachJohn B,

Karah use to swim with The South End Rowing Club here in San Francisco and I know here a bit but not well.

tpamperin, CoachJohnB, KatieK and the others are giving you sound advice. Feedings should happen every 30-45mins depending on what works for you. Make sure to figure out what sort of feed you want. This is very important. What works for me is no guarantee that it will work for you. We all have different digestive systems so experiment and see what happens.

When the water is warm enough start, like CoachJohnB said, with shot swims and increase by a minute or two each day or every other day. You will be amazed at how far your time in the water increases by just a couple of minutes over a week or so.

If your TI stroke is as solid as you say, the distance will be easy. You will need to battle the mental aspect far more. 10 miles is no joke. I've swum it before in the ocean with no landmarks around and it can be intimidating with no idea how far you have gone, minus your pilot telling you. But with the shore near by you should be okay and it will help you understand where you are and where you need to go.

Are you wearing a wetsuit or swimming naked (ie sans wetsuit)? Regardless of which one you do, realize that chaffing might be an issue so have a long swim at some point to determine how much sunscreen, body glide etc you might need.

Good luck with your training and I hope you enjoy The Suck! Love that name!

keep Swimming!
Naji
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-18-2011
swim2Bfree swim2Bfree is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: N. California
Posts: 179
swim2Bfree
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by naj View Post
Are you wearing a wetsuit or swimming naked (ie sans wetsuit)? Regardless of which one you do, realize that chaffing might be an issue
Wetsuits are (I think) not permitted for Swim the Suck. And given that it's a freshwater swim, it's unlikely chaffing will be an issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by naj View Post
Feedings should happen every 30-45mins depending on what works for you.
Feed frequency is a personal choice, though there's some science (conducted by USA Swimming) indicating that more frequent feeds are better. I wouldn't limit yourself to the 30-45min range.

Last edited by swim2Bfree : 01-21-2012 at 10:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.