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  #11  
Old 08-12-2010
Stijn Stijn is offline
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Stijn
Default How does it go Dobarton?

Hi Dobarton,

With regards to your first post I wanted to add the suggestion to start with the earlier TI-drill of balance on your back. This drill has the advantage that it allows breathing all the time, and is rather easy to learn with a soft kick. Furthermore, gently pulling the person you are helping may help him floating. If you sometimes stop pulling, you can see whether your new friend maintains balance, and you would want to increase these moments.

Good luck, also with your own TI experiences!
Stijn
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  #12  
Old 08-12-2010
Stijn Stijn is offline
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Stijn
Default Drills drills

Quote:
Originally Posted by UK_RUSS View Post
hi stijn,

i thought, naively, i was swimming whole stroke...another issue i have is
that on my breath stroke, my leading arm feels like it wants to come down before the rotating arm hits the water....ie - on breathing to my right for example, my left stretched arm feels or does drop too early and usually before the right arm hits the water...and vice versa...but only on my breath...its this a fault or will i learn to keep it stretched over time - when im not on my breath my technique "feels" good
I can only repeat what I already said: the separate drills are intended to maintain your ease and comfort step by step in systematically approaching whole stroke (freestyle) swimming. Most probably, doing some drill sessions will increase your comfort in the water, and will correct your position when breathing. (Notice that breathing is one of the final things which is added in the series of classic TI-drills (I understood that the new self-teaching package integrates whole-stroke swimming much earlier, but also that this package is a complement, rather than a supplement, to Easy Freestyle/Triathlon swimming made easy).

Think about the Kaizen principle (continuous improvement) when doing drills (and at other times), and you'll be whole stroke TI swimming with ease and comfort before you know.
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  #13  
Old 08-12-2010
UK_RUSS UK_RUSS is offline
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UK_RUSS
Default

thanks stijn,

are these drills to be found on this site?
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  #14  
Old 08-12-2010
Stijn Stijn is offline
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Stijn
Default

Hi Russ,

In the 'free stuff' section, you can find some excerpts from TI-books. I don't know whether these include pages with drills. You can also get an idea of several TI-drills on youtube. However, and I have no personal gain in it, I would recommend to lay hold on a basic TI book and DVD (such as Triathlon swimming made easy (book) and Easy freestyle (DVD)), because there you can find the right sequence of the drills and a fuller explanation of how they are to be done, and not the least, also the objective of each drill is clearly explained.
In any case, that is what really helped for me.
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  #15  
Old 08-12-2010
UK_RUSS UK_RUSS is offline
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UK_RUSS
Default

stijn,

most appreciated...ill see what i can find.

i do view TL's stuff on you-tube however....
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  #16  
Old 08-12-2010
Rincewind Rincewind is offline
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There is no argument that you sink as soon as you tense up. I've noticed that countless times.

However I have a hard time understanding why though? It doesnt make sense to me that you are less bouyant when tense vs relaxed. Your mass remains the same so the amount of water displaced should be the same as well.

Can someone explain that to me?
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  #17  
Old 08-13-2010
splashingpat splashingpat is offline
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splashingpat
Default complicated guys should make it simple for ME!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rincewind View Post
There is no argument that you sink as soon as you tense up.
I've noticed that countless times.

However I have a hard time understanding why though?
It does nt make sense to me that you are less buoyant when tense vs relaxed. Your mass remains the same so the amount of water displaced should be the same as well.

Can someone explain that to me?
it is no fun to explain it!
it changes the whole game of things!
does n't it guys!
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  #18  
Old 08-13-2010
borate borate is offline
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borate
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rincewind View Post
There is no argument that you sink as soon as you tense up. I've noticed that countless times.

However I have a hard time understanding why though? It doesnt make sense to me that you are less bouyant when tense vs relaxed. Your mass remains the same so the amount of water displaced should be the same as well.

Can someone explain that to me?
http://www.totalimmersion.net/blog/P...entation-.html

View part 6 for thoughts on that.
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  #19  
Old 08-25-2010
CoachRyan CoachRyan is offline
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Default Back to the original post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dobarton View Post
Hey guys,
I have the honor that another individual at my pool has noticed what I'm doing (both in drills and whole stroke) and has asked, "How do you do that!?" While it's certainly a privilege to be asked to help out, it can be "interesting" to say the least. The gentleman who asked is unable to do regular aerobic exercise anymore due to knee pain which he attributes to weight. He also is currently unable to swim because poor technique has him floundering before 25 meters. So, of course, I offered to help.
Today, I explained that the place to start is simple drills to work on balance, relaxation and swimming straight. He understood and agreed, so we'll work on these for a while. He'll continue pool walking for exercise as well.

My question is this. We started with superman glide and superman flutter. I now do these without thinking about anything but head position and arm position. When he does them, however... He quickly sinks! Not just his legs... He's outstretched with head and arms in a "good" position, but his whole body including head and chest are underwater! If he can't superman glide on the surface, how is he going to get to skating close enough to the surface to be able to "roll to air?" Any thoughts?
Thanks in advance.
dobarton: In regards to your original post above (and this may answer your question rincewind), it is possible that he is letting all of his air out right at the beginning as he starts his glide. I worked with a student recently that had the same problem. Hard to say if this is the same situation or not without seeing it. In my case, the woman I was working with had a fairly low body fat percentage which made it logical that she would sink even in the front if she let her air out. Her skating position was pretty much a slow dive to the bottom. It was fixed when I had her hold her breath at first and then move to slowly bubbling out. You can read my blog post about this on my personal site here: http://wp.me/p10PSu-1P
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