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  #1  
Old 03-26-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,680
andyinnorway
Default Quitting mid set - is that ok?

My question is, is it ok to quit a training session sometimes if you feel you do not have the energy to complete it in a satisfactory manner or should you push through on the tired days to acquire mental toughness.

Today was a 12x200 day.

I was tired from the daylight clock change here in Europe as that meant I was up an hour earlier and I had had my first cycle trip yesterday which had left me a bit stiff and sore as expected.

These were my times all without TT

3.44
3.30
3.16
3.14
3.17

by the end of the 5th repeat I felt I was breathing much heavier than normal and felt if I carried on through the set I wouldn't be much good for anything around the house the rest of the day.

I spent the rest of my hour working on bilateral breathing and flip turns instead at a gentle pace.

Was that a better use of my time, or should I have completed my set as planned and done the best I could?
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  #2  
Old 03-26-2012
CoachPaulB CoachPaulB is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 28
CoachPaulB
Default altering your practice routine

I typically train for a goal or and event. I give myself plenty of latitude, like you did, to alter my routine the farther away the event is. As I get closer to the event, I try to increase my intensity and focus. Keeping other areas of my life in check also becomes more disciplined. Understanding that life is unpredictable I try to deal with it as it comes and intuitively as much as possible. I take the same approach to swimming and practicing for events. Being too ridged in my approach can lead to injury or decreased effectiveness. I've learned that lesson many times over in all the tri-sports.
Hope that helps.
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  #3  
Old 03-26-2012
ian mac ian mac is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 194
ian mac
Default There are no absolutes

Andy,
One of the great American coaches of all was a man by the name of George Haines of the Santa Clara Swim Club who coached great Gold medal Olympians Don Schollander and Mark Spitz. One of his greatest strengths was his ability to alter a practice mid-stream(no pun) when his athletes required it.

I agree with Coach Paul that one needs to give oneself a certain amount of latitude on occasion. The time of season and what your current goals are also can frame your mindset. Yes, sometimes it would be beneficial to tough it out. Other times, no big deal - after all, you seem to already be putting in continuing consistent effort. Sometimes, real life gets in the way of Master's swimming.
Be proud of what you did do - it's more than most.
Ian
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  #4  
Old 03-26-2012
swimmermike swimmermike is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Denver
Posts: 65
swimmermike
Default

Andy

I agree with Ian and Coach Paul.

(This agreement may be self-serving, as I interrupted my own practice this morning due to fatigue).

Nonetheless, I think what Terry has said about such situations to be very important: do not practice struggle.
__________________
Michael Moran, M.D.
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  #5  
Old 03-26-2012
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Rio, Wisconsin
Posts: 564
westyswoods
Default Quitting or Adjusting

The older one becomes, not saying you are old, the more crucial mental flexibility is. My suggestion is learn to listen to your body, and there is nothing wrong with accepting that flexibility which very well may prevent injury and or mental fatigue which leads to burn out.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
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  #6  
Old 03-27-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,680
andyinnorway
Default

Sinuses blocked with a bit of head cold this morning so yesterday was probably the wisdom of age telling me that something was on the way and it was better to ease off.

There is an interesting point in here somewhere, when you are a teenager or college student you have the luxury to train as hard as you can and spend the rest of the day on the sofa recovering.

No such luxuries for the master swimmer with jobs, children and what not.
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