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  #1  
Old 01-26-2012
kilgoretrout kilgoretrout is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2011
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kilgoretrout
Default Burps

About every 3 or 4 laps, when I'm resting, I need to take an extra few seconds to work out some burps. Obviously, I am swallowing air, rather than just letting it go in my lungs.

But what do you do to combat this? I find that when I turn my head, there is still some run off water coming down over my mouth when I try to inhale. So I'm a little anxious to just suck in air directly into my lungs for the slight chance this water goes down the wrong tube. Typically, I swallow a bit of water, but spit it out on a quick exhale. Any drills, or positions, or options, that you could provide to cure my burps?
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  #2  
Old 01-26-2012
PKFFW PKFFW is offline
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I find I have the same problem. Any suggestions greatly appreciated as it is quite embarassing to reach the wall and completely unintentionally let out a jolly big belch!
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  #3  
Old 01-27-2012
tomoy tomoy is offline
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I often get home after a swim, and the air comes out the other end... ahem.

:-X
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  #4  
Old 01-27-2012
kevemoh kevemoh is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
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kevemoh
Default Gulping

I had the same problem (top end only!) and it is definitely connected with gulping and not havng a relaxed intake. The way I've managed to improve it significantly is by doing some lengths with a front mounted snorkel. Exhale through the nose and time a short inhale with your normal breathing pattern. You can't gulp with a snorkel and it trains you to inhale in the same manner without it. Good luck.
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  #5  
Old 02-02-2012
donwu donwu is offline
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I used to have this problem too. After checking with my TI coach, he told me to exhale through the nose as much as possible. When you do not exhale enough, the air that you breathe in will remain in your system, hence burping occurs.
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  #6  
Old 02-02-2012
CoachPaulB CoachPaulB is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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CoachPaulB
Default Slow it down

I've never had this problem. My inhalation is swift and clean. Of course I may catch an incidental amount of water but over a mile in a relatively calm pool i may not inhale any water at all. I swim a lot of open ocean swims and I take in very little water there as well.

I recommend that you slow down to a manageable pace for about 200m and focus on your exhalations first and foremost. Once established that you have a full exhalation under water than focus on the inhalation. Absolutely no exhalation should occur when rotated to air. Only a quick inhalation and then face back to neutral position with no holding of breath. Good spine alignment is a must as is proper lateral rotation. If body is improperly aligned then turbulence is likely and taking in water or non rhythmic breathing (gulping air) may likely occur.

Good luck
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  #7  
Old 02-02-2012
Butiki Butiki is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2011
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I got reminded of this thread just 2 days ago. I was resting, standing on one end of the pool, when a guy in my lane did an awkwardly slow open turn. As he did so, he let out a cracking sound, then he was off again. Quite sneaky actually. The young woman in the next lane rolled her eyes and chuckled. I just smiled and shook my head.

I almost never get this now but I had this issue back in the day. It was actually so severe sometimes that I'd feel some left-over gas in my tummy a few hours later. Personally, once I overcame the panic of getting air and relaxed a bit at breathing, the problem was solved.

Sometimes, there will be a small trickle of water in the bottom corner of the mouth as you turn to breathe, and that is normal, especially if you're breathing in your bow wave, with one goggle under water. I get this "run off" water from time to time, but then I know as well that I'm getting my required air. Once you achieve the feeling of "trust" (i.e. that the air is there even in the bow wave), then you get to relax. You then avoid gulping and swallowing air.

Coach Suzanne describes in detail the "swim and nod" drill. This eases a lot of breathing issues and will eliminate a lot of your breathing anxiety.
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  #8  
Old 02-02-2012
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
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Isn't it lovely when you did build up some tension in your stomach and then can let out a good burp? Such a relief :-()

Yes, it has to do with gulping air and water and not really breathing it out again. It gets better with time.


Hang on in there...
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  #9  
Old 02-03-2012
tab tab is offline
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tab
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I was playing with the nodding drill again today, what a wonderful exercise. I am finding I can breath with water in my mouth at the same time, no need for big gulps, just the right amount of air and I was not swallowing any water. I noticed today, after fooling with the nodding drill I did not have my typical burping. Swam for an hour and no burps. I am also testing if 1/4" whiskers shed water differently than a clean face, I have to shave tonight.
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