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  #1  
Old 01-17-2012
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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Default At What Point ....?

There seem to be so many helpful posts, but sometimes it is hard to tell if one is at the stage where the suggestions are helpful. for instance, when is it advisable to use a tempo trainer, or a heart rate monitor, evf, counting strokes, doing sets, etc?

I started right away with a TT, but it seems that when I use it, I tense up and lose the relaxed feeling when doing SG. Maybe this is just something I need to get over.

I guess what I am asking, there must be some logical progression in the whole process. The obvious is try it and if you can't do it, go back a few steps. But some of the things that are bought (such as TT and such) cost money.

I do have the dvd easy freestyle and also Terry's book (2004).

Any direction would be appreciated

Sherry
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  #2  
Old 01-17-2012
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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Default At What Point.

Sherry,

Your questions are ones many of us struggle with. I believe the answer is with the individual.

Some of the issues we must just struggle through while others need to be backed off a few steps until skills catch up.

An example being the use of TT with me. When I first started using one it seemed as though everything fell apart. Coordination of anything seemed to fall apart due to my focus on that stupid beep. This did not mean my skill sets were bad, instead there was a learning curve necessary. Thanks to others on this forum and similar experiences I was able to work through it.

Now I can swim and listen to tempo, still find it hard to walk and chew gum.

Hope this helps

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
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  #3  
Old 01-17-2012
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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tks westy for your comments both on this thread and others.

Sherry
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  #4  
Old 01-17-2012
CoachPaulB CoachPaulB is offline
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Default TT

When I know that there is no one else in my lane or around the immediate area and I am trying to get in the groove with my tempo trainer I will close my eyes for a few strokes. Something happens...I guess a unifying or rhythmic sensation takes over. Also sometimes I hum a song to the beat and it distracts me from the mechanics, say in timing of the breath and things kind of happen on their own.
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  #5  
Old 01-17-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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I think you are right that we all struggle with different aspects and that can make it difficult to have a listed order in which to do things.

I guess learning to have a view on the macro picture and understand all the elements of good stroke allows you better to make a decision about, the consequence of a missing element.

e.g. no 2bk you can learn to swim quite well without it but it catches you up eventually as you need it for a little extra speed and even better balance.

struggling with TT is mainly about metrics and having a concrete way to measure your progress plus it helps with getting symmetry and rhythm but you can learn great TI freestyle without using one.

With reference to the recent discussions on the new website an extended glossary of terms, and stroke elements (along with why they are important) would be great.
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  #6  
Old 01-18-2012
ernewill ernewill is offline
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I am not as experienced as most of the other folks on this forum. However, I would suggest using the TT for only part of your workout. Start out working on your form with various drills. Then combine that into a couple nice sets of laps where you focus on the various elements of your strokes. On lap think body position. Next lap think lifting the elbow properly. Next lap think mail slot entry while just finishing the glide on the other hand (sort of a catch-up drill). And so on and so on. Pretty soon a few hundred yards will be behind you. Then when all of that is feeling smooth, slip the TT under your cap. To be nagged by a TT for an entire workout will be counter productive. Use it to help develop your pace. Then take it out for a set of laps. Then put it in.
Ted
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  #7  
Old 01-18-2012
swimmermike swimmermike is offline
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Sherry

It should be a servant to you, not the other way around. As several people have said, it should help you work on particular issues--"put pressure" on, for instance, your stroke count, by increasing tempo.

I use it about once a week, to aid in that kind of focus. In much the same way, I will use fistgloves to enhance balance work in my drills. But these tools are just that--tools.
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