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  #1  
Old 12-07-2015
lykthomas
 
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Default Critique my stroke to help me improve

I took a TI weekend workshop years back and have been practicing on and off. Let me know what you think of my stroke. Two things that a TI coach told me was that my stroke ends too early and my entry is too close to my head (should be at elbow). Thanks!

https://youtu.be/vlHbO4Glpyk
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  #2  
Old 12-07-2015
borate borate is offline
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Consider easing off a bit on the body roll. And keep the elbow always above the hand on the recovery and pull.
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  #3  
Old 12-07-2015
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lykthomas View Post
I took a TI weekend workshop years back and have been practicing on and off. Let me know what you think of my stroke. Two things that a TI coach told me was that my stroke ends too early and my entry is too close to my head (should be at elbow). Thanks!

https://youtu.be/vlHbO4Glpyk
My first thought was that you're swimming kind of deep, so your rolling for air has to be so extreme (to reach air). This is how I swim too, and although my balance could be improved further, I think that a lot of my problem is pure physics -- my body type is too dense to stay easily at the surface, but with care and balance I stay as close to the surface as possible, still remaining parallel, i.e. horizontal.

Your legs sink a bit, but come up nicely when you kick, then rapidly start to sink -- but then so does the rest of your body when the velocity drops. That's why I suspect it's a density thing.

(P.S. But I agree completely with borate regarding the collapsing of your elbows on the pull -- that movement eliminates the forearms as a useful vertical surface for increasing traction on the water when you most need it).

Can you tell us when you take a huge deep breath and float vertically in the pool, how much of your head breaks the surface?

Last edited by sclim : 12-07-2015 at 05:53 PM.
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  #4  
Old 12-07-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Wow, this is looking pretty extreme.Your forward speed comes almost to a complete standstill.
Looks like combination of this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=59mG97ukRpM
and this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbK-pDBL2C0

Dont know why you make it extra difficult for yourself.
Balancing on a bicycle is much easier when there is some forward speed, and I think the same is true for your swimming.
You are nowhere near a speed that will cost a lot of effort and seem quite young and fit. Maybe you enjoy the balance action required, otherwise I dont see the point of swimming at such a low strokerate.
Maybe you can explain what your swimming goals are?

You are obviously not the most buoyant swimmer so this even increases the difficulty of what you are doing.
Getting a bit swimfit would be my choice if I where in your shoes. Your balancing skills are not bad.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 12-07-2015 at 09:18 PM.
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  #5  
Old 12-07-2015
tony0000 tony0000 is offline
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As others have noted, being so far underwater is causing problems. I'm wondering what would happen if you pushed off the wall upwards rather then downwards. Once you reached the surface and started your stroke (at a somewhat higher cadence), would you ride higher or would you sink down?

Tony

"Swim by the mile; improve by the inch."
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  #6  
Old 12-07-2015
daveblt daveblt is offline
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I don't think the sinking looks excessive but I think the reason his body seems to sink somewhat is because of the stroke rate combined with over rolling to his side and staying there longer than he needs too, making it seem more like a drill . So ,roll a little less only to clear the shoulder and pick up the rate just a bit .

Dave

Last edited by daveblt : 12-07-2015 at 10:12 PM.
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  #7  
Old 12-08-2015
lykthomas
 
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Thanks everyone for the feedback! In general I gather that some issues are:
- stroke rate too low
- over-rolling
- elbow should be above hand during recovery and pull
- swimming very deep

I don't understand the elbow portion. Can someone explain or provide a video link?

I have to say that I was intentionally going slow, maybe because I was being filmed and I wanted my stroke to be clear to the viewer. I also feel that going fast might cover up some of the errors. I do swim at higher stroke rates some times. What is the optimal for someone that breathes on every 3rd stroke?

Zenturtle, I want to swim long and short distances in openwater and pool comfortably. I don't compete but I hope to improve my swimming constantly (kaizen!).

Quite a few of you said that I am very deep in the water. I guess my body fat percentage is lower because of other land sports. In terms of buoyancy test (to reply sclim), when I take a deep breath and stay vertical in the pool, the water level is between the middle and top of my forehead. How does it compare to the average adult male?
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  #8  
Old 12-08-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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I think the avarage is about nose level, so you are dense, but not extreme.
I admire your skill to breathe this way and swim so slow. It would drive me nuts.
What if there some chop at the surface?
Maybe you can make send some more footage under harder effort.

See you are into own bodyweight exercises?
You know Hannibal for king? Think this guy sinks like a brick ;-)

Last edited by Zenturtle : 12-08-2015 at 10:49 AM.
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  #9  
Old 12-08-2015
tony0000 tony0000 is offline
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Elbow over the hand is a very simple idea. You want as much surface area as possible pushing against the water on your pull. So you want to get your forearm vertical in the water as soon as musculature will permit. There are many youtube videos on the topic. (Looking at your stroke, I would not say that you are particularly deficient in this respect.) Because canonical TI emphasizes balance and streamlining, it doesn't talk much about EVF. But I don't think anyone is opposed to it.

I encourage you to post a video of your swimming at a higher stroke rate it you get a chance. It's informative to see how TI works with different body types. I think your first video demonstrated how too much "total immersion" can be a bad thing!

Tony

"Swim by the mile; improve by the inch."
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  #10  
Old 12-08-2015
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Hi lykthomas,

These are all good responses and excellent remedies, but first it's important to identify the source of your issues - the sinking, riding low, elbow dropping/arm scooping to surface, leg splay, going into a whole body stall. What do you think is the root cause, and open to anyone else who wants to take a stab at identifying the source.

Stuart
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