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  #1  
Old 06-20-2016
bx bx is offline
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Default Translated subtitles for Shinji's YouTube videos

I noticed today that YouTube have introduced an auto translation feature.

In particular, if, like me, you've always wondered what Shinji was saying in his regular videos on the Swim Like Shinji channel, now you can, sort of! The auto translation is rather hit-and-miss, but you can get the gist.

EDIT: It appears YT has had this feature for years! But I've only just noticed.

Last edited by bx : 06-20-2016 at 07:23 PM.
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  #2  
Old 06-20-2016
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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If the automatic translation is as good for Shinji's Japanese as the auto transcription is for a swimming video with an Australian accent it could be quite amusing.

I'm prepared to give it a go, though. The automatic speech on some of Shinji's videos is pretty accurate but sounds quite odd in places.

Most automatic translation is complete rubbish but sometimes one can figure out what went wrong.
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  #3  
Old 06-20-2016
bx bx is offline
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Richard, I'm not sure if the auto translation works from user-supplied subtitles (in their native language), or whether it parses the spoken words (which would be a real feat of engineering when you have background music).

Maybe I've just noticed the feature if Shinji only recently added subtitles to his YT videos.

The translation is only about 20% accurate, but it's sort of enough when you add the pictures and gesticulations!
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  #4  
Old 06-21-2016
lloyddinma lloyddinma is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post

I'm prepared to give it a go, though. The automatic speech on some of Shinji's videos is pretty accurate but sounds quite odd in places.

Most automatic translation is complete rubbish but sometimes one can figure out what went wrong.
I agree.

If I recollect correctly, in one of his video feeds, the viewer was asked to place his hands where his "eyes cannot see them."

It is best to just have it done by a polyglot.

I seem to think I did at some point, but was disappointed. I will check this out though again.
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Last edited by lloyddinma : 06-21-2016 at 02:06 PM. Reason: ...
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  #5  
Old 06-21-2016
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lloyddinma View Post
I agree.

If I recollect correctly, in one of his video feeds, the viewer was asked to place his hands where his "eyes cannot see them."

It is best to just have it done by a polyglot.

I seem to think I did at some point, but was disappointed. I will check this out though again.
I may be taking this completely out of context, but I have noticed some good insight initially at looking and monitoring my lead hand as it went from patient lead hand to catch, looking for cleanness and linearity of movement (I was being premature, and then adding all kinds of extraneous wobbly sweeping movements to my catch), and for good vertical forearm, high elbow at end of catch.

However, now that I'm supposed to be imprinting this position into my muscle memory, I notice that keeping on looking at my catching hand (by sheer habit) is throwing off my my upper body alignment and balance. If I were looking down at the pool bottom, like I should be, my lead hand would be "where my eyes cannot see".
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  #6  
Old 06-22-2016
lloyddinma lloyddinma is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sclim View Post
If I were looking down at the pool bottom, like I should be, .
You might be onto something.

Interestingly, he admonishes his swimmers to look a few feet ahead as opposed directly down.
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Old 06-22-2016
sclim sclim is offline
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Yeah, Shinji's gaze-direction is a slight variant on that of standard mainstream TI, which my understanding is, straight down 90 degrees.

My understanding of Coach Shinji's logic (and I'm on very thin ice here, I can't even remember on what basis I think this, I've watched a few of his videos and read several of his explanatory posts) is that the face looking slightly forward is part of his pressing down with the chest idea -- he visualises a more effective pressing down with the face if the face-pressing is directed slightly forward.

Please note that the above remembered reason may be completely off -- but I am certain that, as you say, the Shinji method gaze is slightly forward, not down.

I should mention, though, that the fault of mine I am describing is not even Shinji's looking slightly forward but basically down. I'm still looking at my lead hand as it goes into catch, which is higher than Shinji's look target and off to the lead hand and catch side! Trying to rid myself of this -- it's a distraction. In Aikido when you do a proper (downward) katana cut you don't distract yourself by looking down, or even at your blade tip, or even at your opponent, certainly not at his blade. You gaze out horizontally, at infinity, really, which fits in with the idea that you have blended with the universe, and by doing so, with your opponent/training partner. You focus on nothing, which becomes taking in the whole universe (not all the separate little things in the universe) and you become the universe. A little esoteric, I know, but I put great importance into where you look because it's an important part of where you send your "Ki" 氣 or "Qi" in Mandarin Chinese. Sorry, this has nothing to do with the practical problem of translation.

Last edited by sclim : 06-22-2016 at 10:18 PM.
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  #8  
Old 06-22-2016
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sclim View Post
Yeah, Shinji's gaze-direction is a slight variant on that of standard mainstream TI, which my understanding is, straight down 90 degrees.

My understanding of Coach Shinji's logic (and I'm on very thin ice here, I can't even remember on what basis I think this, I've watched a few of his videos and read several of his explanatory posts) is that the face looking slightly forward is part of his pressing down with the chest idea -- he visualises a more effective pressing down with the face if the face-pressing is directed slightly forward.

Please note that the above remembered reason may be completely off -- but I am certain that, as you say, the Shinji method gaze is slightly forward, not down.

TI has never advocated "where" to look. Only combinations of 'hanging the head, aligning the spine. Many people that they end up looking down when they use the focal points, so sometimes it's an easy shorthand, "Look straight down". but we really want people to feel the body work as a whole and you can adjust the head angle without adjusting anythign else...which may sometimes be useless.

looking a few feet ahead may help people feel taller in the upper chest as well. but I'd also never tell someone specifically to look a few feet ahead. everyones body & spine are different so everyone ends up with different ideal head positions that may change over time.
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  #9  
Old 06-22-2016
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
TI has never advocated "where" to look. Only combinations of 'hanging the head, aligning the spine. Many people that they end up looking down when they use the focal points, so sometimes it's an easy shorthand, "Look straight down". but we really want people to feel the body work as a whole and you can adjust the head angle without adjusting anythign else...which may sometimes be useless.

looking a few feet ahead may help people feel taller in the upper chest as well. but I'd also never tell someone specifically to look a few feet ahead. everyones body & spine are different so everyone ends up with different ideal head positions that may change over time.
This makes much more sense than my long-winded explanation that was trying to arrive at the same place that you have. Relax, be tall, be in balance.
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  #10  
Old 06-23-2016
lloyddinma lloyddinma is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sclim View Post
Yeah, Shinji's gaze-direction is a slight variant on that of standard mainstream TI, which my understanding is, straight down 90 degrees.


You focus on nothing, which becomes taking in the whole universe (not all the separate little things in the universe) and you become the universe. A little esoteric, I know, but I put great importance into where you look because it's an important part of where you send your "Ki" 氣 or "Qi" in Mandarin Chinese. Sorry, this has nothing to do with the practical problem of translation.
I understand the point you are getting at. I was just saying that the angle of gaze would naturally have an impact on where you could put your hands where "your eyes could not see them."

Suzanne's point is buttressed when you look at the classic TI Flagship swim video (with Terry). He is looking ahead.

A lifeguard commented that my head was too submerged and suggested looking ahead. My breathing has been eased which has been incidentally helpful, as for the last few months, I have been spearing deeper.

The Aikado tenet is interesting as it meshes with recent scientific research having an open-focus gaze: bliss...creativity etc. I will look it up.

:)
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-- J. Ch__st.
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