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  #1  
Old 08-07-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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Default More evidence for Terry's spinal support concept

Hey All,
This week I spent more time than usual working on back stroke. (I realized that the other three strokes were improving much faster than back and my 400 IM is looming in mid-October). I spent a lot of time working on body position. I forget the name of our drill but it is basically skating, on your back, with the recovery arm raised to 30 degrees off the water. I like this drill because it is very difficult to keep my body in line and on top of the water. Keeping the arm raised makes it very difficult to hold the "ust enough" rotation. I use a nose clip for slow back stroke work because I am still a bit unstable and fall under a lot. After about 15 minutes of this drill alternating with back single and triple switches, I noticed my spine and ribs were getting really tired. I have been a little sore in these muscles for the past few days. (It is a strange feeling to be sore in these places.) I would count this as evidence that suggests the spinal support muscles are the ones that hold us in proper alignment in the water.

I tried to do the same with free, find a place where I can hold my arm in a partial recovery (I was hoping for right at the spear point), but I just sank until the water supported more of my arm so I didn't feel the extra effort. I am still processing why I could stay at the surface with back but not free.

to top it off, I managed a 10 stroke length after doing this (my usual low end is 12.
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Old 08-07-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Maybe it would be like the "stun gun" drill? TI also has the pause drill. There is also the term "hesitation drill."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J__UlyCuCAk
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Old 08-08-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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Yes. That drill is exactly what I attempted. One of the things they note in that video (at least the way Frank Bausch describes it) is that it really works the legs. You have to really hit the legs to keep your body up. I felt a much greater need for extra leg work in the free style version than the back stroke version. I am not sure why.
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Old 08-08-2009
splashingpat splashingpat is offline
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Default the ability to breath...i thnk

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachEricD View Post
Yes. That drill is exactly what I attempted. One of the things they note in that video (at least the way Frank Bausch describes it) is that it really works the legs. You have to really hit the legs to keep your body up. I felt a much greater need for extra leg work in the free style version than the back stroke version. I am not sure why.
backstroke...another easy stroke for me....
and i don't swim it because it is.
my ability to breath!

just maybe
I not sure why.
hi guys,

splashin'pat
I been going to the POOL, and swimming....
(me) my daughter and my mom...
well . . . mom was ready to get her leg check out.....but not now!!!
the water cured her!
WOW!
PAT

Last edited by splashingpat : 08-09-2009 at 01:59 AM.
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  #5  
Old 08-09-2009
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shuumai View Post
Maybe it would be like the "stun gun" drill? TI also has the pause drill. There is also the term "hesitation drill."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J__UlyCuCAk
I would find it hard to recommend or see benefit in that drill, as demonstrated. Also, I'm hard-pressed to find enthusiasm for a drill that "really works the legs."

The significant deficit in the drill in the link above is that the swimmer is forced to brace and scull with the lead hand. If you're a believer in the importance of the quality of the circuits you imprint (and myelin or motor cortex neurons you grow), you'd never want to do anything that leads to bracing and sculling.

Likewise "really working the legs." My constant goal is to work my legs as little as possible -- even when working on maximizing the power output of my 2BK. I try to do that as much as possible with a well-timed weight shift and as little as possible with fatigue-prone and glycogen-gulping leg muscles.

When doing the BK drill Eric describes I work on maintaining even balance with impeccable weight distribution so my kick remains relaxed. And of course with well-tuned spinal stabilizers.
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