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Old 11-18-2008
Jamwhite Jamwhite is offline
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Default Discovering how fit I actually am

(Sorry if this the wrong forum for this. I could not find a "general" forum, or anything for TI stories. In my defense, as I am referring to the Total Immersion book, I thought this forum made sense.)

This morning, I did Yoga for first time (ever). After class, I spent a good 5 minutes trying to get the instructor to believe that I had only been working out (and swimming at that) for seven weeks.

Eights weeks ago, I ran up three flights of stairs and nearly passed out from the blood pressure change because I was so out of shape. After struggling for a week to swim, I picked up Total Immersion from my bookcase where it has collected dust for a while. As you would expect, love at first read, and amazingly I have consistently gotten up at 6am 5 days a week for the next seven weeks.

Now in the book, Terry says that "fitness happens" as you swim TI. In my mind, there was always an hidden word "eventually", because lets face it, I swim 1-2 hours and my arms are not very tired. I am not sore the next day. I barely feel like I do anything at all except leisurely gliding up and down the pool. How much fitness could I really be getting? I figured it was a bit of an exaggeration.

I decided to start Yoga to get a workout. I cannot express how shocked I was that I was able to keep up in the class. Since this morning, I have discovered that I can run up and down the same three flights of stairs many times and fully recover in a few quick breaths. Still I remain shocked that instead of being a little more fit, which I would expect, I am actually much more and can do stuff that I have not been able to do in several years.

If others find that results vary, please allow me to provide two important facts: first, I am 30 years old and second, I did karate for 6 years about 8 years ago (1994-2000).

(and yes I did recommend Total Immersion to the instructor.)
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  #2  
Old 11-19-2008
terry terry is offline
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Jam
Congratulations on the physical transformation you are pursuing and have begun to realize. I feel that yoga and swimming are nearly ideal complements. In general terms because both promote synergistic blending of strength with suppleness in integrated whole-body movement.
In TI terms they complement because both emphasize mindful movement.

I've experienced however that "yoga fitness" -- the ability to do a moderately challenging class of 60 to 90 minutes without fatigue -- is specialized. I can be highly fit for other activities and fatigue quickly in yoga class if I've not been attending class regularly.
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Old 11-19-2008
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamwhite View Post
Eights weeks ago, I ran up three flights of stairs and nearly passed out from the blood pressure change because I was so out of shape.
I'm glad you survived and are doing well.

Uh...you're lucky you didn't actually drop dead the way that some people do when they shovel snow after not being active for a long time. Is your diet good, or was it only youth that saved you? hehe
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  #4  
Old 07-08-2009
ayesr ayesr is offline
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Default Fitness Defined

I believe CEO TL or MadVet cited the test for fitness this way (I recall reading these in some other forum thread):

o putting your body to its limits (in whatever physical endeavour), and
o measuring how fast your body is able to recover.

Doing something, even for long duration or under heavy loads, that your body is already accustomed to, (thus, your body fails to experience "stress" conditions), will not be indicative of your fitness.

You have to push the body to its limit, then measure how fast you are able to recover from the situation. The faster the recovery, the fitter a person is.

End.
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Old 07-13-2009
elskbrev elskbrev is offline
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As an older athlete, I find that I progress best when I work where I feel comfortable rather than push limits. Over time, this comfort zone just naturally grows, which sounds like what Jamwhite has experienced.

What makes this best for an older athlete? Pushing limits often leads to injury, which means down time and loss of progress.

Greatest gains are made in small frequent increments over time.
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Old 07-13-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elskbrev View Post
As an older athlete, I find that I progress best when I work where I feel comfortable rather than push limits. Over time, this comfort zone just naturally grows, which sounds like what Jamwhite has experienced.

What makes this best for an older athlete? Pushing limits often leads to injury, which means down time and loss of progress.

Greatest gains are made in small frequent increments over time.
Out of the blue I did a bunch of push-ups. The next day I was sore but I swam anyway. That night my triceps hurt so much it was hard to lift my arms in anyway that stretched my triceps. So, I'd have to agree with what you said! "...small frequent increments over time."

When I first started jumping rope I couldn't walk well for days afterward!

Last edited by shuumai : 07-14-2009 at 05:23 AM.
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  #7  
Old 07-15-2009
ayesr ayesr is offline
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Default Stress Test

I believe the idea behind this "testing to its limits" (am qualifying that the "limit" being that point short of physical injury) is similar to the cardiac stress tests that a patient is made to go thru - usually using the treadmill as the medium - wherein a person is made to go thru a set of ever increasing paces, from slow to somewhat a more fast pace, with the arterial blood flow (to the heart) as the primary marker.

The flow rate at rest (not being stressed) vis-a-vis flow rate when stressed and compared to a benchmark - that of a normal person - would give indications of how poor one's physical condition maybe...
***********
I agree with you - incremental is the way to go (to avoid injury). But I believe the idea behind is still valid. You have to reach a certain physical level of exertion that you have not yet reached before (this is very subjective of course) and afterwards, evaluate your physical markers i.e., muscle pain, energy level, tiredness, and then determine how fast these physical evidences disappear or normalize. Thus, the duration of the recovery period is a measure of one's fitness.
***********
I might be out-of-context here but the phrase "...no pain, no gain..." I think drives my point about fitness.
***********

Anyway, Els, Shu how would you measure one's fitness?

End.
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