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  #1  
Old 02-20-2011
5-rise 5-rise is offline
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5-rise
Default Superman Glide and Whole stroke

I had previously been using "Superman Flutter" to "tune-up" before swimming but the other day I tried Superman Glide again, which I haven't done since I first started to learn TI. I experimented with it for a bit and found my legs stayed up longer if I arched my back slightly so my legs pointed upwards on the push-off. When I looked at the Easy Freestyle DVD again, I realised that this is what Terry appears to do when demonstrating. I then tried swimming from the glide position and I seemed to feel more balanced.

So the question is, are you supposed to consciously maintain your back in a particular posture when swimming?

Jon
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  #2  
Old 02-20-2011
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
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Good question. I never give give conscious thought to arching the back, mainly because it would be uncomfortable and is one more thing to think about. I aim to think about, and do, the minimum required for the stroke to work. My experience is that arching the back isn't necessary.
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  #3  
Old 02-20-2011
IbnSaeed IbnSaeed is offline
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IbnSaeed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5-rise View Post
I had previously been using "Superman Flutter" to "tune-up" before swimming but the other day I tried Superman Glide again, which I haven't done since I first started to learn TI. I experimented with it for a bit and found my legs stayed up longer if I arched my back slightly so my legs pointed upwards on the push-off. When I looked at the Easy Freestyle DVD again, I realised that this is what Terry appears to do when demonstrating. I then tried swimming from the glide position and I seemed to feel more balanced.

So the question is, are you supposed to consciously maintain your back in a particular posture when swimming?

Jon

Excellent question.

I also noticed with my SG. Even though my body was horizontal, and my swimming buddy would confirm that my shoulders and my butt cheeks were visible above the water, this was when i was completely relaxed.

But then i tried arching the back, and i felt a bit different in my legs as if they went up as well.
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  #4  
Old 02-20-2011
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IbnSaeed View Post
...I tried arching the back, and I felt a bit different in my legs as if they went up as well.
Superman glide can help strengthen the core and stabilizers. A slight pelvic tilt (bottom pushed out) achieves better positioning for me as well.

There has been considerable discussion of this. The consensus seems to be not to overdo the natural arch. (We're not talking high-level sprinting here.)
Experiment with the feel of various muscle tensions to see what works best for you.

Here's Shinji, a world-class glider.
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Last edited by borate : 02-20-2011 at 04:55 PM.
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  #5  
Old 02-20-2011
IbnSaeed IbnSaeed is offline
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IbnSaeed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by borate View Post
Superman glide can help strengthen the core and stabilizers. A slight pelvic tilt (bottom pushed out) achieves better positioning for me as well.

There has been considerable discussion of this. The consensus seems to be not to overdo the arch, some of which is natural. (We're not talking high-level sprinting here.)
Experiment with the feel of various muscle tensions to see what works best for you.
I think arching the back, diverts the attention of the brain from being relaxed into getting the arch just right.

Ill stick to relaxed position as I can still get a horizontal position.

Eagerly waiting for the Self-Coach workshop DVD to arrive.
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  #6  
Old 02-20-2011
cynthcor cynthcor is offline
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Not sure that I would agree you should "arch" your back as much as I would recommend you consciously engage your core. When I arch my back, it starts to ache after a while. When I engage my core I stay balanced. When I arch it feels like I'm pushing the muscles out - when I'm engaging my core it feels like I'm bearing down.
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  #7  
Old 02-20-2011
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Mike from NS
Default engage the core

Does engaging the core mean, or feel like, "sucking in the gut"? But then arching or engaging removes some of the relaxed state that we strive for. Right? or Wrong
Mike
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  #8  
Old 02-20-2011
ames ames is offline
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ames
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In Terry's newest dvd, the Self-Coached Workshop, he addresses this in passing under the section on the 2-beat kick. He shows a clip of how he streamlines his body, switching from one track to the other. He freezes it at one point and says, "The slight curve in my back shows how hard it is to stay aligned," meaning that, although his legs are high, his back shouldn't be arched to make that happen. Any deviation from a straight line adds drag. Now, how you get your body perfectly straight but without being overly tense I can't answer!
ames
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  #9  
Old 02-20-2011
boken boken is offline
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I've recently been trying a more engaged lower abdominal and a flatter pelvis and it seems to be doing very well. In Superman glide I think I have more points touching the surface if I try to lightly draw the pubic bone up (towards my navel, think Michael Jackson mid-grab). I thought that it would make my legs sink because I have relatively tight hip flexors and moving the pelvis like this requires the angle of the femur to extend further back to maintain a straight position; but this has not been the case. When I remember to do it whole stroke I see noticeable time/stroke count improvements.

It is still new and it does require energy and concentration to stay engaged. I hope that I'll find a happy balance where I can remove the 'tension' without losing the 'engagement'. My motive is not to flatten the curve of the lower back, although it does some, but to hopefully have more stability in my swimming posture as I rotate, kick, etc.
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  #10  
Old 02-20-2011
IbnSaeed IbnSaeed is offline
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IbnSaeed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ames View Post
In Terry's newest dvd, the Self-Coached Workshop, he addresses this in passing under the section on the 2-beat kick. He shows a clip of how he streamlines his body, switching from one track to the other. He freezes it at one point and says, "The slight curve in my back shows how hard it is to stay aligned," meaning that, although his legs are high, his back shouldn't be arched to make that happen. Any deviation from a straight line adds drag. Now, how you get your body perfectly straight but without being overly tense I can't answer!
ames
Hello Ames

is this what you are referring to:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwpvBMfUoAs

Watch from 1:14 onwards.
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