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  #101  
Old 09-09-2018
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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my main focal point on every swim is Natalie Coughlins

Plant your arm and swing your body around it.

You can focus on the planting part, or on the swinging around part (the TI focus)
Important to keep the body fishlike from the ribcage down, all the way to the point of the toe.
Thats where dryland instincts can emerge when you start to pull before you have setup your anchor properly (planting the arm)
If you dont havent setup up your anchor properly , there is nothing to swing forward from.
But once you have an anchor in the water, then its almost forget about it, throw that highside forward , and corkscrew/sqeeze past it.

I think for a lot of TI swimmers its a good idea to shorten the extension, get a quick meathook claw in the water and pull with the trunc abdominals/obliques right to the other side and repeat.
Most have simply no idea to hook up the anchor to the trunc, and get a rhythm going that way.
The TI beginner style with long pause and jerky pull keeps you in that unknowing state forever.
Especially the start of the pull needs some help from the trunc.
Once you have found that short trunchelping rhythical style , you can lengthen out streamline more again, while keeping contact with that rhythm.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 09-09-2018 at 12:49 PM.
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  #102  
Old 09-09-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenturtle View Post
my main focal point on every swim is Natalie Coughlins

Plant your arm and swing your body around it.

You can focus on the planting part, or on the swinging around part (the TI focus)
Important to keep the body fishlike from the ribcage down, all the way to the point of the toe.
Thats where dryland instincts can emerge when you start to pull before you have setup your anchor properly (planting the arm)
If you dont havent setup up your anchor properly , there is nothing to swing forward from.
But once you have an anchor in the water, then its almost forget about it, throw that highside forward , and corkscrew/sqeeze past it.

I think for a lot of TI swimmers its a good idea to shorten the extension, get a quick meathook claw in the water and pull with the trunc abdominals/obliques right to the other side and repeat.
Most have simply no idea to hook up the anchor to the trunc, and get a rhythm going that way.
The TI beginner style with long pause and jerky pull keeps you in that unknowing state forever.
Especially the start of the pull needs some help from the trunc.
Once you have found that short trunchelping rhythical style , you can lengthen out streamline more again, while keeping contact with that rhythm.
Agreed.

One thing i have been working on lately is slowing down the stroke to get both arms working together through the trunk

i found that relaxing the hands and almost screwing them counterclockwise at extention then back through clockwise to set up catch in time with the weight of the recovery coming over

feel like im connected through the shoulders when i do this

hands claw like but relaxed sort of like turning 2 taps on & off out front
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  #103  
Old 09-09-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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i noticed Thorpe had a bit of this out front
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  #104  
Old 09-13-2018
sclim sclim is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,499
sclim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenturtle View Post
I think for a lot of TI swimmers its a good idea to shorten the extension, get a quick meathook claw in the water and pull with the trunc abdominals/obliques right to the other side and repeat.
Most have simply no idea to hook up the anchor to the trunc, and get a rhythm going that way.
The TI beginner style with long pause and jerky pull keeps you in that unknowing state forever.
Especially the start of the pull needs some help from the trunc.
Once you have found that short trunchelping rhythical style , you can lengthen out streamline more again, while keeping contact with that rhythm.
Just to be clear, you are suggesting that for less experienced swimmers who don't have a feel for the rhythm to shorten the lead hand extension and, presumably, also the patient lead hand wait, and to get the meathook claw set up early?

Once the trunk-helping rhythm is dialled in, then the swimmer can gradually lengthen out the streamline again, keeping an eye on not losing the rhythm.

So the idea is only to shorten the extension initially as a temporary aid to "getting" the rhythm (and feeling that the pull is from the abd obliques, not from the arms or even the lats)?

Last edited by sclim : 09-13-2018 at 12:54 AM.
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  #105  
Old 09-13-2018
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Yep. but also the lats. Arms sort of feel static during the pull. swimming with simple straight/hooked arms is good enough.
See thread from ramTI, Uchimura basic style

Last edited by Zenturtle : 09-13-2018 at 02:17 AM.
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  #106  
Old 09-14-2018
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Sclim, from 3 min 50...Talking asbout older swimmers with less flex in the shoulders-
Thats what I mean by keeping the arms a bit in the meathook shape for most of the time.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUkcHT9AnCw
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