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  #11  
Old 12-09-2010
Grant Grant is offline
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[quote=aksenov;15373][BThe secondary purpose of TI practice is health. Being healthy is not necessary means being happy, but there is no happiness without health.

I agree with most of your two posts and you have outlined the subject area very well. However I must voice a differing opinion about your last words that I have highlighted above.
I have met a number of people who belie the statement that there is no happiness without health. Some who have teminal cancer and know their days are numbered. Some who are crippled and paralysed by disease or accidents. These people were amongst the happiest humans I have known. Perhaps a distinction is that although they do not have physical health they are emotionally happy.
I had the belief that one needed health to be happy but as I have aged, in my experience that is far from actuality in some cases. Perhaps it is not what happens to us, it is how we handle what happens that is the key.
May we swim with ease at the the speeds we choose.
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May we swim with ease at the speeds we choose.
Grant
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  #12  
Old 12-09-2010
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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westyswoods
Default Greater Purpose

Philosophical discussions always seem to be endless. This is a good thing as they exercise the mind.

Healthy minds do not need healthy bodies. Joy, sense of well being and purpose all require healthy thoughts. This is where the philosophy of TI melds with the development of a greater purpose, healthy living. Along the path to seeking perfection of a swim stroke, the values and path we follow I find very applicable to all aspects of living.

Swim Silent Be Well and Enjoy The Journey
Westy
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  #13  
Old 12-09-2010
splashingpat splashingpat is offline
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splashingpat
Default I am so happy that you posted and offer an insightful view & it all came form YOU

[quote=Grant;15382]
Quote:
Originally Posted by aksenov View Post
[B The secondary purpose of TI practice is health.
Being healthy is not necessary means being happy,
but there is no happiness without health.

I agree with most of your two posts and
you have outlined the subject area very well. However
I must voice a differing opinion about your last words that
I have highlighted above.
I have met a number of people who believe the statement that
there is no happiness without health.
Some who have terminal cancer and know their days are numbered. Some who are crippled and paralyzed by disease or accidents.
These people were amongst the happiest humans I have known.

Perhaps a distinction is that although
they do not have physical health
they are emotionally happy.
I had the belief that one needed health to be happy but as
I have aged, in my experience that is far from actuality in some cases. Perhaps it is not what happens to us, it is how
we handle what happens that is the key.
May we swim with ease at the the speeds we choose.



Grant thank-you
Like I said I love hearing from the students...
once again!

Don't you just love correcting the teacher ... and offering your insight!
I did ...I do ...
and I am so happy

You did too!

Congratulations
I am beginning to love you and
your post and understand them too!

If you love me ...I will probable love you back!
but I will send my love anyway ...
so it unconditional just for you (hi Grant!)

correct me if I am wrong....because
I to like to be right!I'm not all the time....but you guys will set me straight ;o
I should depend on that as well!

Last edited by splashingpat : 12-09-2010 at 09:14 PM. Reason: because I love the students feedback! and I hope you guys do love mine too!
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  #14  
Old 12-09-2010
Grant Grant is offline
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[quote=splashingpat;15386
If you love me I will probable love you back!:)[/QUOTE]

Ah. So your love is conditional. o:)
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May we swim with ease at the speeds we choose.
Grant
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  #15  
Old 12-09-2010
terry terry is offline
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Default Two More Elements of Practice

Here are the next two 'elements of practice' that I identified while pondering this topic. There are five others in my list. I'll post them in two batches.

Body/Mind/Spirit Integration - In all practices that are expressed in action rather than contemplation – e.g. yoga and tai chi - mindfulness is of the essence. A practice calls on and develops the full range of human faculties and brings them into greater balance.

Happiness and Harmony – Whatever you do in a practice should align with and create harmony around the core truths. None should create conflict.
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Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
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  #16  
Old 12-10-2010
Grant Grant is offline
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Location: Sooke, BC. Canada
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Grant
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[quote=splashingpat;15386][]
If you love me ...I will probable love you back!
but I will send my love anyway ...
so it unconditional just for you (hi Grant!)

Does life get any better than this?
May we all swim with ease at the speeds we choose.
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May we swim with ease at the speeds we choose.
Grant
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  #17  
Old 12-10-2010
CoachTodd
 
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I'm a little behind in my reply but that's due to mulling it over for a day. I'll add to the new thoughts but some of this tracks.

Definitions from Wikipedia on Practice and Physical Exercise.
[b]Physical exercise[b] is any bodily activity that enhances or maintains physical fitness and overall health or wellness. It is performed for various reasons. These include strengthening muscles and the cardiovascular system, honing athletic skills, weight loss or maintenance and for enjoyment. Frequent and regular physical exercise boosts the immune system, and helps prevent the "diseases of affluence" such as heart disease, cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and obesity. It also improves mental health, helps prevent depression, helps to promote or maintain positive self-esteem, and can even augment an individual's sex appeal or body image, which again is also linked with higher levels of self-esteem.
[b]Practice[b] is the act of rehearsing a behavior over and over, or engaging in an activity again and again, for the purpose of improving or mastering it, as in the phrase "practice makes perfect". Sports teams practice to prepare for actual games. Playing a musical instrument well takes a lot of practice. It is a method of learning and of acquiring experience. The word derives from the Greek "πρακτική" (praktike), feminine of "πρακτικός" (praktikos), "fit for or concerned with action, practical" and that from the verb "πράσσω" (prasso),"to achieve, bring about, effect, accomplish".
So How Do We approach/look at Swimming? Is it a physical exercise or practice? I believe this is the root question Terry is asking. When I think about other sports I realize that Baseball, Football, Volleyball, etc., call what they do everyday in their respective areas practice. They save the word workouts for when they hit the weights, running, conditioning activities not related to the playing of their sport. Their practices consist of repetitions of specific drills related to their respective sports, i.e., baseball they take batting practice, infield/outfield practice, situations, running the bases, taking leads, sliding, pitchers work in the bullpens on throwing specific pitches, pick-off moves, etc. As my college baseball coach emphasized that when the time came to make a play you would have practiced it enough and would have thought out the appropriate action ahead of time so when you were involved in the action you would react and not think about what needed to be done. This would result in a routine play looking easy and a spectacular play look routine by previous practice.
This is very similar to TI in that people who have seen really good TI form, i.e., Shinji, see that he makes it look so easy and beautiful. But, most beginners don’t realize that is has taken him 4+ years to get to this point. It has been and continues to be a journey not a destination. So yes, perfect practice does make perfect anything. Just as with any sport thinking about how you perform a specific task is critical to the success of accomplishing that task. I think the problem with the majority of people that do not come from a sport background do not realize the amount of practice professional athletes and top elite athletes in any sport have spent honing that craft through mindful practice and thinking about every little thing associated with that particular task. This is one thing that I have noticed with new TI swimmers. They are amazed and become mentally tired when they first start learning TI. I have to keep reminding them that it is not the destination we are after but the journey TI takes us. For most this is a new experience.
Practice is necessary and important to achieve the end result of perfect TI or perfect anything. So my three phrases would be:
Practice.
Conscious/Patient/Purposeful Practice.
Quality not quantity.
Enjoy the journey don’t rush to get to the destination.
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  #18  
Old 01-30-2011
ames ames is offline
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ames
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I have not kept up with the ti forums lately and just came across this thread and it reminded me of an incident at the pool that happened a couple weeks ago.

The guy in the lane next to me was a friendly but rather cocky guy I had chatted with before. He is a very good swimmer in the sense that he is fast, has a low stroke count, and keeps his head very low, in the bow wave, when he breathes. In other respects, he could make some improvements, like he tried to tell me I need to hold my breath more so I will ride higher in the water. He is a sprinter, not a distance swimmer, so his methods work for him, and he is very attached to doing it his way. To each his own.

So, he asked me, "How far you swimming today?"

I said, "Dunno, I don't count laps."

He said, "Oh yeah, that's right. How long you swimming today?"

I answered, "I don't know. I don't look at the clock."

He looked puzzled. "Then how do you know when to get out?"

"When I'm done."

I explained that I just swim to relax. Which isn't really true, I do swim to improve, I swim to get some exercise, I swim just for the joy of swimming... He said, "Relaxing, yeah, I should do that..." But the expression on his face looked like he was having a hard time getting his head around it.

We swam some more and at the end of my practice and his workout, he said, "You know I was thinking about what you said about relaxing while swimming, and there was this one time when I was in the middle of a really hard workout and I sort of fell into a trance, I felt like I was just rocking back and forth like I was in a cradle. It was incredible and I've never felt it since. I'll never forget it."

I said, "Wouldn't it be amazing to be able to feel like that every time?"

Not that I myself have acheived that kind of zenlike grace, but I have had plenty of peaceful, thrilling, memorable, and transcendent moments along my 1 1/2 year ti journey, and I know there will be plenty more.

I went from not being able to swim at all to a year later, swimming in the ocean over a coral reef!

Yesterday there was a girl in the lockerroom telling her mom what she did at swim practice. She was saying, "And I swam 50 free, and 50 backstroke, and 50 kick..." and I wanted to ask, "So are you a better swimmer than you were yesterday?" I always swim with a focus so I can improve each time. That focus often changes once I start swimming, when another issue comes up or things don't work like I thought they would in my head, but that's ok, I still get the chance to improve in some way. I never just grind out my laps. I always work to improve something, but am flexible about it. I always make sure I get plenty of time to play in the water as well.

ames
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  #19  
Old 02-01-2011
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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Location: Rio, Wisconsin
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westyswoods
Default Constant Awareness

Ames,

Thanks for the post. Sunday while at the pool and many times previous I have experienced like interactions with swimmers, most are much faster than I.

Sunday a middle age man swimming next to me struck up a conversation, the theme being why I often only swim maybe five or ten yards stop and return. He is a quite efficient swimmer. My simple answer was that I am attempting to gain a feel for the water and what is working and what is not. BTW Celeste if you are reading this I had just got done with many repeats of hip nudge.

His expression was priceless. My response was, what did you feel the last few laps you swam other than effort? Expression and response were, never gave it a thought.

I finished got out of the pool while the gentleman resumed swimming. Low and behold he was doing push offs stopped stood up and walked back to the wall.

Thanks to TI and all who participate on this forum.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy

Last edited by westyswoods : 02-01-2011 at 11:54 AM. Reason: spelling
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