Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Swim Your Way to Health
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-11-2012
CSLEE CSLEE is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 27
CSLEE
Default oxidative stress

Just read about most competitive swimmers who are under consistent training would suffer from oxidative stress, how true is it? I have a 10 yo son who swims almost everyday for about 1.5 hour a day, definitely don't wish him to have any complications due to oxidative stress.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-11-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,680
andyinnorway
Default

Not heard of it until now

http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/chil...e-stress-36315

If it was my kids I would assess the extremities of the session load (don't know whether your son is an elite junior or just active club swimmer), and then read some more and consider the advice, e.g. balancing the effects with diet options.

Also the first 3 articles I have read from the google search all refer to the same test of 22 people so perhaps I would look for more extensive data.

Something I do know is that I can't think of any of the swimmers in my year at school who didn't succeed in their academic and professional persuits, so if your son is learning the discipline of early morning training, coupled with the socialisation of being part of a team and getting the conditioning only swimming can supply I would be pretty pleased. My nieces and nephews are in that age group and older and are much more facebook and playstation
focused.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-11-2012
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CSLEE View Post
Oxidative stress? I have a 10 yo son who swims almost everyday for about 1.5 hour a day, definitely don't wish him to have any complications due to oxidative stress.
You ask an excellent question. Physiologists and health experts are paying increasing attention to the possible damaging effects of higher intensity exercise. While I feel it's unlikely to occur in adolescence, I would love to see more parents think -- and ask coaches about -- how holistically healthful the swim team experience is overall.

The larger concern for adolescent swimmers is whether they are having a learning experience, with most practice time focused on teaching skills, rather than what I call "Ready, Go" coaching, in which the kids do lots of laps, with uncorrected errors, and come to experience swimming as an unstimulating mouse-on-a-wheel enterprise.

Coaches should be giving feedback constantly.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-11-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,680
andyinnorway
Default

If I ever get to coach a swim team I will definitely look to use big screen live video delay so my swimmers can do a 50 and see it on time delay video without having to push any buttons.

I have a crude version of this software on my mac which I use when on swim month in the US. Its great, no fiddling, just lift the goggles and watch.

Last edited by andyinnorway : 12-11-2012 at 02:54 PM. Reason: swim team, not swim time
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-12-2012
CSLEE CSLEE is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 27
CSLEE
Default

not sure whether he is elite or active but in his same age group, he is inside top ten swimmers at the national level. Anyway, I do agree with what you said, I have read quite a lot of articles about competitive swimming for kids, real competitive swimming starts at the age of 14 or 15, below that it is all about early physical growth and talent, so what is more important is to let them enjoy swimming, enjoy training and competition, winning or losing is quite insignificant yet.
as my rationale for him to train in the water about 6-7 sessions a week is based on general agreement from most of the coaches (again searched and read from the internet) that for 10yo boy in "competitive" swimming, the advisable qty of swimming hour per week is about 10-11, in our club, the "water training" time is about 1.5hour per session, of course the exact swimming time maybe is less than that.
I have read a lot about over-training and definitely have seen a lot what happened to the over-trained kids, so I don't wish my son will have the same fate.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-12-2012
CSLEE CSLEE is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 27
CSLEE
Default

Terry, thank for your comment.
I am the chairman of the swimming section of our club, fortunately i can see that our coaches train our swimmers reasonably in term of volume and intensity, although some elder swimmers (15 and above) seem to be under-train as their training hours is less than 15 per week, but most of them still can perform quite well in the competition as they compensate the lack of training with proper strokes and techniques.
For my son, at this junction until he is 13/14, I put a lot of emphasis on these aspects as I believe once you really take care of your strokes n techniques, the physical growth at the later stage will naturally take care of your racing results.
Hopefully i am heading towards a correct direction.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.