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  #51  
Old 12-06-2011
nighthawkz nighthawkz is offline
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nighthawkz
Default 600 yards nonstop

Dear Robedon:

Tonight I swam 12 laps consecutively for the first time since I started swimming in September. Prior to last week, the most I could swim was one lap (50 yards) at a time. I felt out-of-breath at the end of each lap and needed a breather. I have worked up to total distances of 1500 yards to a mile per pool session, but always just one lap at a time.

What was different about tonight was that I really focused on gliding during recovery. This had the effect of slowing me down a lot, but by maintaining this slow stroke rate and my form I didn't over-exert myself and didn't get out-of-breath.

I also tried to focus on the 'sensory skill practices' described in chapter 7 of the Total Immersion book, especially keeping my arm extended.

Previous posters' advice about starting to exhale as soon as the mouth returned to the water seemed to help a lot as I found that I could gulp a lot air during inhalations.

The remainder of my 1500 yard swim was broken into 200 yard repeats, a series of 'yoga breaths' helped me to recover my breath during the rests.

Hope this helps. Happy Swimming.

Nighthawkz
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  #52  
Old 12-06-2011
robedon robedon is offline
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Default following up

wow, I didn't realize this thread was still going.. I still believe the biggest hurdle for me was getting past that out of breath discomfort that would occur around 250 yards, and then I'd stop to rest and go again. Eventually I pushed myself to swim throught this discomfort and let go of the wall and start another lap.

Currently, I'm swimming twice a week and usually swim between 1500-1750 yards per session without stopping. my last laps are just under a minute and 21 SPL for a 25 yd pool. At the end of my session, everything is in a nice rhythm and I'm not out of breath at all. And the only reason my sessions aren't longer is because I swim on my lunch hour.

So, for those that are still getting out of breath, the best advice I can give is swim through it.
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  #53  
Old 12-07-2011
nighthawkz nighthawkz is offline
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Default good to hear

I guess a lot of us have experienced problems with getting the breathing part right...

Thanks for your reply, it's inspirational to hear that you were able to learn from the thread, persevere, and make it to where you are today.
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  #54  
Old 12-07-2011
hippo hippo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robedon View Post
So, for those that are still getting out of breath, the best advice I can give is swim through it.

This is very useful!

That and learning how to really relax the unneccesary tension helped me to break through.

Hippo
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  #55  
Old 12-08-2011
robedon robedon is offline
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robedon
Default to clarify my point

in case I wasn't clear... I just want to explain just a bit further on the swim through it. for some reason when I run, or ride, or swim, I hit this wall in the first few minutes where I may get a little out of breath. I've talked to others who do the same. but after about a 10 minute warmup I usually get a rhythm and I'm not out of breath on the rest of the run (minus a big hill) or ride (minus a sprint or big hill). anyway, I hope it helps. The wall is your friend if you're drowning, but if you're trying to log distance it's not. it takes some getting used to that uncomfortable feeling of having your head in the water and out of breath, but eventually all your moving parts get in a rhythm.

cheers,
DR
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  #56  
Old 12-09-2011
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madvet View Post
3) Inhale when your arms aren't actively pulling -- you can't open your chest, while your back and chest muscles are working to close your chest.
Except that a) you can and b) breathing is primarily driven by the diaphragm...I think this is a red herring that just cropped up last week when someone linked to another site and wondered if the diaphragm was the answer?

The reason not to breath while pulling is that the timing is wrong. When breathing, the lead arm should still be extended, and the opposite arm in some phase of recovery...no contaction of back or chest muscles is needed adn the body should be relaxed.
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  #57  
Old 12-09-2011
tab tab is offline
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I use the nod drill to keep my head in the proper place and have found it a good stone to step on in the breathing journey. I have also realized just now after reading the last few posts that I am breathing at the correct time. In the past it was hard to focus on where I took my breath. More imprinting has allowed my body to focus on other things. Streamlining for one, the catch another, no or very few bubbles. If sharing a lane I can see a difference in the disturbed water coming from the other side of the lane. I still am only up to 50 yards and I am happy to take a break, to refocus and gain composure. I don't believe it does any good to push into uncomfortable territory, at least for me. Why imprint sloppy work. I am in no hurry, still. Things are for sure improving, I can feel the difference in the water. My fear factor has dissipated greatly, I have also noticed. Comfort in the water must be a big factor in breathing.
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  #58  
Old 12-11-2011
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Breathing tips from Karlyn Pipes Neilsen

Relax: Air will always be available, but not if you fight for it. Let the water support you & enjoy. Bob & blow bubbles like a kid.

Timing: Exhale some air almost as soon as the face enters the water. Taking a "little off the top" will minimizes the CO2 reflex that falsely triggers your need for more air. You just took a breath, silly.

Velocity: Try to "hum" or trickle your air out without a lot of force. Forcing your air out uses extra energy and does nothing to help you swim across the pool or bay.

Volume: As you hum/trickle your air out, always leave a little in reserve. If you completely empty your lungs, you have no other alternative than to take the next "breath" and that breath may be all water.
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  #59  
Old 12-17-2011
max_boost max_boost is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post

The reason not to breath while pulling is that the timing is wrong. When breathing, the lead arm should still be extended, and the opposite arm in some phase of recovery...no contaction of back or chest muscles is needed adn the body should be relaxed.
Hi CoachSuzanne, this post of yours really hit home today. I noticed that as my lead arm is extended, while I'm inhaling, my opposite arm is close to my side. It all happens really fast but it's in this position I find that I don't feel rushed in getting air. It's as if my recovery arm is still moving but in slow motion. After I get the air, my arm comes out of the water and passes by as my head goes back into the water.

I hope that makes sense? It just feels like if I'm rushing the recovery, my breathing is rushed and kind of throws everything out of sync.
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  #60  
Old 12-18-2011
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
Except that a) you can and b) breathing is primarily driven by the diaphragm...I think this is a red herring that just cropped up last week when someone linked to another site and wondered if the diaphragm was the answer?

The reason not to breath while pulling is that the timing is wrong. When breathing, the lead arm should still be extended, and the opposite arm in some phase of recovery...no contaction of back or chest muscles is needed adn the body should be relaxed.
Wooh big moment for me, I have been breathing during the pull

I checked terry's video and see its exactly as you said, during recovery. Its times like this you wish you had a physical coach who would see these things straight away.
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