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  #11  
Old 04-14-2011
galax galax is offline
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thank you Alan,
I have another question, about Faster Tempo:

In this kind of practice , when Tempo descending should SPL decreasing too?
for example I realize for some range of TT setting, approximately from 1.15 to 1.05 the number of stroke for a lenght doesn't rise , on the contrary for some stints faster tempo means 1 stroke saved.
The same sensations happened in Calibration Stroke : passing from N-1 to N-2 ,
when I increased my tempo ( I was trying to spend one more stroke ) I saved one.
At high frequency ( TT < 1.00 ) the situation back to normality : when I increase tempo SPL normally decrease ( more strokes)

I don't wanna bore someone with my question after this I don't post any other question for some time (:D)
Best regards

Last edited by galax : 04-14-2011 at 01:09 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-14-2011
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWP View Post
Maybe also practice multiple repeats at the same count ie.
3 rounds of
4x25 @ 17spl
4x25 @ 18spl
4x25 @ 19spl...
When you become keenly aware of how to manage each count then maybe increase distance a bit, say
2x50 @ 17spl
2x50 @ 18spl and so on...
If this begins to feel good you can incorporate your ability to cycle through each count within the same repeats as in the "stroke calibration" set
Alan is suggesting you apply the principle of Progression here. This is a universal basic principle of training.
1) You give the body some task to perform.
2) Over some period, through repetition, the body adapts to that task.
3) Once it adapts, no further growth, improvement or adaptation will occur until you increase the difficulty or workload.

Traditional training focuses on building 'bigger lungs and muscles.' So the progression was built on making sets longer or harder to basically burn through more heartbeats, oxygen and glycogen.
When you can swim 8 x 50, holding say 45 seconds, on an interval of 60 seconds, do 10 or 12 x 50, or reduce interval to 55 seconds. Or improve pace to 44 seconds.

But in swimming, bigger lungs or muscles have never guaranteed faster times. Longer strokes, on the other hand, have far more consistently resulted in faster times.

So we suggest Progression be much more focused on measures of stroke length. Working off Alan's suggestion, here is a highly basic example
Swim 4 x 25 @ 18SPL.
If successful, try 4 x 25 @ 17SPL
This adapts you to a longer stroke.

Later work on training your nervous system to be flexible in SPL
Swim 8 x 25, alternating 17SPL on odd and 16 SPL on even.
This tasks you to calibrate your length and timing with a degree of precision.
Initially you'd do this with only one goal - hit the wall in your chosen count.

When your nervous system adapts and that task becomes easy, add a small new challenge. Swim effortlessly faster when you add a stroke. You don't necessarily need to time this. When you first do it, just FEEL the added speed.

At some later time, introduce a new element of Progression. Swim longer repeats. E.G.
4 x 50 @ 16+17 SPL
If you succeed at that, try the reverse
4 x 50 @ 17+16 SPL. Much harder.

Then 4 x 75 @ 16+17+18. On your first go, it would be reasonable to see efficiency slightly degrade on subsequent laps -- but try to avoid a larger increase in SPL. With practice, you should soon be able to do
4 x 75 @ 16+17+17

And eventually
4 x 75 @ 18+17+16

Apply the Principle of Progression to all these potential elements in set construction
Duration/Distance
Stroke Count
Tempo
Time
Rest Interval

Virtually every set I do tests my ability to combine 2 and more often 3 of those elements. Once I master a particular combination, I look for some way to raise the bar.

Typical combinations
SPL and Distance
SPL and Time
SPL and Tempo
Tempo and Distance
Tempo and Time
with Duration and Rest Interval being fungible on all of them.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story

Last edited by terry : 04-14-2011 at 12:49 PM.
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  #13  
Old 04-16-2011
galax galax is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post

So we suggest Progression be much more focused on measures of stroke length. Working off Alan's suggestion, here is a highly basic example
Swim 4 x 25 @ 18SPL.
If successful, try 4 x 25 @ 17SPL
This adapts you to a longer stroke.

This is the first step..Many, many thanks
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