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  #11  
Old 01-06-2011
Grant Grant is offline
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Location: Sooke, BC. Canada
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Grant
Default plank video

Thanks Dr S. for the video. I do an exercise routine on my off swim days. So T, Th and Sat are my dryland days. For years I have done the Plank and a few variations. Can hold the basic plank for well over a minute. This morning I incorporated most of the adaptions your video showed and had the best dryland sweat I have had for years. I was one greasy old guy.
As an aside I have incroporated bent knee sit ups this week into the routine and yesterday at the pool I discovered a slight hitch in my left side when rolling to my left. Tightened that up and lo and behold a much smoother result. At least it felt smoother and the lengths were faster at the same stroke rate.
Blame it all on core work. :o)
Thanks again.
May we swim with ease at the speeds we choose.
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May we swim with ease at the speeds we choose.
Grant
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  #12  
Old 01-06-2011
madvet madvet is offline
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Originally Posted by atreides View Post
... I decided to just relax through the lap even forgetting about my posture. Even though I felt like my legs were sinking a bit, I felt like I was more comfortable and less tired......
About the shoulder see posts of mine from several years ago about avoiding internal rotation of the arm and wrist. Probably like your "spaghetti" thing.

The tension you are feeling that is tiring you out is more likely that you are holding tension in your chest secondary to your trying to wrestle your legs up. Lifting your legs up properly shouldn't really tire you out.

I think it might help if you swam in this relaxed fashion and ask somebody to tell you how low your feet really are. If they are too low GENTLY use your lower back to bring them up just a little bit. Do that for a few weeks then review whether they are still too low. And so forth.
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  #13  
Old 01-07-2011
atreides atreides is offline
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Originally Posted by madvet View Post
The tension you are feeling that is tiring you out is more likely that you are holding tension in your chest secondary to your trying to wrestle your legs up. Lifting your legs up properly shouldn't really tire you out.
Thanks for the tip, John. I think you're right although I'm not sure how to relieve the pressure. I think the tension is a vestige of the bad old days when I first learned conventionally. Plus during that time even when I could swim halfway decently, I had a master coach tell me my butt and feet were too low. But I think that I'm learning to release it [tension]as a function of of trying not too rip my pull. When you think about it, you have to muscle up to prepare to rip through a pull. And part of it is getting my arm into the proper catch position although I'm fairly pleased with my recent progress. I'll let you know how it goes.
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  #14  
Old 01-07-2011
flppr flppr is offline
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Originally Posted by atreides View Post
Do you think by swimming really slow that you are actually developing a better feel for the water during the catch phase which is simultaneously improving your balance. One thing that I have noticed is that it appears that for me slower is better when I am in the catch phase. When I want to really move , I have a tendency to really rip my arms through the water. Its hard for me to control because once you are on your way you just sort of get caught up . I wondering if there are really two speeds. The speed in which your recovery arm gets to the water is one. And the speed in which your arm moves through the water. As I think this through, it would also seem that the speed of arm has to be slightly "slower" than the speed of the body in order to hold more water.

So by slowing every thing down are you guaranteeing that you maintaining this relationship. And if you neuro circuits as Terry is fond of referring to can be programmed to recognize the relationship , then even at faster reps your arm speed in the water will be adjusted to your body's speed in the water and you will retain the water holding tendency. Just a thought. Probably wrong.
My focus with the slow swimming I'm doing is on improving balance, not the catch. I work on my catch with spear and zen switches.
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  #15  
Old 01-08-2011
bnichols4 bnichols4 is offline
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Very impressive demonstartion - I belive this will help me as well.

Brent
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