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  #11  
Old 11-29-2011
shanex shanex is offline
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Originally Posted by arunks View Post
Regarding a conscious attempt to make a clean hand entry this is what Gary Hall Sr has to say.. A different opinion.What do you think...

"The other old-school habit that bothers me is what I call the modern-toilet-seat-syndrome. Most of us have seen these new toilet seats that have a spring that slows them down and keeps them from slamming against the toilet when dropped. Many swimmers I teach enter their hands into the water just like these new toilet seats. They slow down the arm just before the hand enters the water, hoping to avoid all of those terrible air bubbles they've heard about. The problem is that by slowing their arm recovery and the hand entry, their stroke rate slows and they seem to get just as many air bubbles as when they let their arms rip and throw their hands forward aggressively. The ability to get rid of those nasty air bubbles has more to do with what one does with the hand after it gets into the water and the sensitivity in the finger tips than it does with the speed of the hand as it enters the water. So forget about being delicate. Let your arms rip through the recovery with relaxed wrist and hands. Enter the water with full extension…or close to it. Then get ready for another good underwater pull with a high elbow, feeling the water as well as you can."
I think he's just talking about a different type of swimming style frankly - "rip", "aggressively", "forget about being delicate" - all these are counter to TI philosophy. Sounds like he's swimming purely for speed. A focal point I always keep in mind is Terry's "try to disturb the water as little as possible". I do this with both the arms (mail slot) and legs, and have found, by experimentation that indeed I do slip through the water much better this way. Crucially, it's also a lot less tiring..
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  #12  
Old 11-29-2011
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arunks View Post
Regarding a conscious attempt to make a clean hand entry this is what Gary Hall Sr has to say.. A different opinion.What do you think...

"The other old-school habit that bothers me is what I call the modern-toilet-seat-syndrome. Most of us have seen these new toilet seats that have a spring that slows them down and keeps them from slamming against the toilet when dropped. Many swimmers I teach enter their hands into the water just like these new toilet seats. They slow down the arm just before the hand enters the water, hoping to avoid all of those terrible air bubbles they've heard about. The problem is that by slowing their arm recovery and the hand entry, their stroke rate slows and they seem to get just as many air bubbles as when they let their arms rip and throw their hands forward aggressively. The ability to get rid of those nasty air bubbles has more to do with what one does with the hand after it gets into the water and the sensitivity in the finger tips than it does with the speed of the hand as it enters the water. So forget about being delicate. Let your arms rip through the recovery with relaxed wrist and hands. Enter the water with full extension…or close to it. Then get ready for another good underwater pull with a high elbow, feeling the water as well as you can."

Mr. Hall is seeing a problem with ongoing poor execution of recovery & entry, and blaming it on water entry. With TI we introduce a pause with some of the drills to teach a better sense of timing. But with the use of gravity and weight shift, we eliminate the pause. We never say enter slowly, we say enter smoothly. We advocate quickening the recovery phase as the alteration to your stroke when you swim at faster rates.

we don't "get rid of air bubbles", we try to reduce their appearance in teh first place. Presense of air bubbles suggests a disturbance of the water surface bringing air underneath...this creates waves and waves create drag.

Reduce drag by having a clean entry at any speed...then you don't have to worry about eliminating them afterwards. There will be more bubbles at faster speeds, but this doesn't mean that you should simply accept them at slower speeds. Learn to execute a good stroke slowly before worrying about "ripping through the recovery".
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  #13  
Old 11-29-2011
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Originally Posted by arunks View Post
I keep hearing in many of the swimming commentaries where there say there is no whitewash or bubbles during the catch.(Recently after watching Sun Yang's 1500m freestyle recently posted)What enables this?I feel it’s the forces they apply during the catch.How should the force be applied during different phases of the catch...
I wonder how Gary Hall, Sr. would explain the lack of bubbles in the world record holder's stroke?
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Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

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  #14  
Old 11-29-2011
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
I wonder how Gary Hall, Sr. would explain the lack of bubbles in the world record holder's stroke?
Easy answer. He would refer to this video. Listen for a minute or so and you will hear why.
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  #15  
Old 11-29-2011
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Originally Posted by borate View Post
Easy answer. He would refer to this video. Listen for a minute or so and you will hear why.

Hahaha...awesome. Thank you for the laugh. (1:40 for anyone curious)
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Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

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