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  #11  
Old 02-18-2016
michaelmarshall5030
 
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Originally Posted by s.sciame View Post
I started with the last 15s of cold water, then the last 30s, then the last minute etc. And I always expose feet and hands first, head last. Breathing hard while standing still helps a lot to deal with the initial shock. How long, guess about 5 minutes. Once I took a cold bath and stayed 10 minutes but not fully immersed yet. For a shower I think it's pointless to stay more than 5 minutes, you want to train habituation more than acclimatization (for the latter you would need much more time but you may not have it). The key is doing it consistently day by day. As for standing under the water the whole time or not, for me (still a beginner) it depends: after swimming or dryland training I feel stronger and warmer and I stay under cold water the whole time. When I feel less strong I close the water while I use soap and then open it again.
As the lone swimmer says, cold is always cold, you feel it but you just take care less if you're trained to it.
Lastly, at the end of a cold shower, I feel great!

Hope that helps,
Salvo
I tried the cold shower thing... Umm, never again...... I'll try another method, since I'm determined to ditch the wetsuit...
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  #12  
Old 02-19-2016
s.sciame s.sciame is offline
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s.sciame
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Originally Posted by michaelmarshall5030 View Post
I tried the cold shower thing... Umm, never again...... I'll try another method, since I'm determined to ditch the wetsuit...
the first few days are very tough indeed But it's only 15 seconds at the beginning, don't give up so early.

I see it this way: there are a lot of good reasons for taking cold showers (if you search on google you'll find at least 10). And we basically lost a capability that our ancestors had, because we always have to change the environment we live in (overheating in winter, air conditioning in summer etc). After all, how did they wash themself before warm water?

Anyway, cold exposure in general (dry or wet) improves brown fat building, so you may also expose yourself to cold in dryland. Is it what you're planning to do?

Salvo
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  #13  
Old 02-19-2016
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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If you're interested in cold acclimatizaion and habituation you may find this article interesting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35341642

It sounded a bit like cruelty to children to me, but it seems the adult child swimmer doesn't regret it at all.
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  #14  
Old 02-19-2016
michaelmarshall5030
 
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Thank you Richard
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  #15  
Old 02-22-2016
s.sciame s.sciame is offline
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s.sciame
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Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post
If you're interested in cold acclimatizaion and habituation you may find this article interesting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35341642

It sounded a bit like cruelty to children to me, but it seems the adult child swimmer doesn't regret it at all.
Great article, really liked it!
Thanks Richard,
Salvo
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  #16  
Old 02-24-2016
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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What has worked for me in the past to swim in cold water was a three step process.
1. Get in water and swim for about 5 minutes with face above water.
2. Go back on land and warm up and recover for about 5 minutes.
3. Put earplugs in and get back in water to do the actual intended swim, after splashing cold water on my face.

When I do step 3, the water feels much, much, warmer than it did during step 1. Earplugs are a your-mileage-may-vary thing, I get very dizzy in cold water if I don't use them. If the water is very cold and you're swimming in it a lot, earplugs help prevent bony narrowing of the ear canals.

E.T.A.: splashing the cold water on your face will acclimatize you faster than splashing it on your pulse points as they used to teach in Red Cross lessons. There's a nerve called the vagus nerve running down the face and nose which affects heart rate. This is why people gasp when they jump into very cold water, and why the heart can actually stop from doing it.

Last edited by Rhoda : 02-24-2016 at 05:39 PM.
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  #17  
Old 02-24-2016
michaelmarshall5030
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhoda View Post
There's a nerve called the vagus nerve running down the face and nose which affects heart rate. This is why people gasp when they jump into very cold water, and why the heart can actually stop from doing it.
I am familiar with the Vagus Nerve... It is the third most important part of the Nervous System; the brain and spinal cord being one and two. The Vagus Nerve essentially is the sensory relay from the brain to the internal organs in your torso.
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  #18  
Old 03-10-2016
michaelmarshall5030
 
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I am sort of bummed because as much as the water temperature of the river is in the high 30's to low 40's, depending on the day, I do not have a swim buddy to swim with, even if I would agree to wear a wetsuit. The person who usually swims with me during the "typical swimable weather/water temperature" as a safety precaution refuses to get in the water because he feels that a wetsuit still does not provide enough protection from the cold. The water temperature is going to slowly climb into the low 80's as the year progresses; and my buddy tells me he won't even get in with a wetsuit until it reaches the low 60's. After all, that is where we both were at last year when skiing.

How does this pertain to this thread? After working toward my goal of not wearing a wetsuit at all year round (hoping I would find someone to join me even if they wore a wetsuit), I now know a person can make it into the 40's and feel comfortable with the right wetsuit after doing some experimentation. I know that a lot of folks say it is a personal comfort thing, yet from personal experience that the time to use a wetsuit is much beyond what people think.

I guess I will not be swimming year round, even though I have now been able to be in 35 degree water for over 20 minutes, since I do not have that buddy for safety precautions.
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