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  #1  
Old 11-29-2015
RXL RXL is offline
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RXL
Default Arm Recovery help

I decided awhile ago that to move forward with my swimming I needed to see a TI coach. I took the plunge and its been a total eye opener. Anyway I am at the stage now where I am learning the recovery aspect of the stroke.

From my last lesson I left with a dry land drill which involves adopting a bent over position with one arm extended with the other near my thigh. I then have to do small elbow circles gradually making these circles bigger until I have reached the 'mail slot position'. I hope this makes sense. My problem is that this is not translating so well to swimming in the pool as I cannot seem to achieve the same feeling as I do when I practise on dry land.

Can anyone recommend a way to master this? I appreciate this is one of the more difficult aspects of the stroke but I would like to try and get this to a reasonable standard before my next lesson. Thank you.
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  #2  
Old 11-30-2015
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Try watching this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWzQc1XadHk
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  #3  
Old 11-30-2015
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
:) :) happy to see you back posting Suzanne.
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  #4  
Old 11-30-2015
bx bx is offline
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RXL, if you can get the elbow-lead, marionette arm feeling on dry land, but it all goes to pot in the pool, it could be that your aquatic posture is too floppy. This is a personal discovery over the past year, that a good, toned, stable platform is needed to get the body high enough and flat (balanced) enough to be able to reproduce the TI recovery in water.

These dryland core exercises from Richard Quick's Posture, Line and Balance video were helpful to me, and maybe to you!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5PYspkknE
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  #5  
Old 11-30-2015
RXL RXL is offline
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RXL
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CoachSuzanne,
Thats a coincidence I have been looking for that particular video and I could not find it thanks!

Bx,
My posture in the water is normally pretty good and my coach has also mentioned that my posture in the water is good. However now I am concentrating on the arm recovery my posture has slipped somewhat so I guess I need to get this back on track. I will look at the videos and give them a try. Thank you.
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  #6  
Old 11-30-2015
Danny Danny is offline
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I found this link helpful too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WsfHjyacxY
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  #7  
Old 11-30-2015
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Here's a demo of both 'swing' rehearsal and warmup; warmup being waking up the rotator, getting the blood flowing in the shoulder joint before getting in the pool. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQoQYvQkuk8

Both swing and elbow circles rehearse the recovery flow with full range of motion of the shoulder, no impingement. If elbow lifts above or outside scapular arc (upper arm bone or humerus lifts above back plane) where shoulder is outside its range of motion, shoulder gets stuck or impinges.

Stuart
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  #8  
Old 11-30-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Next to aquatic posture and feeling supported by the water it helps to have the extended arm supported by the water.
If your hand is lower than your elbow on the extended arm and you underwaterpart is so stable that you can feel the weight of the recovering arm press a bit on the extended arm when you bring it forward its easier to make a relaxed recovery.
Body in concrete on the low side, body in vacuum on the high side.
You can also have pressure on the extended arm when your hand is high scratching the water surface, but that is the bad way.
If your extended arm is pointing down too much it isnt working nicely either, so its searching for the right position.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 11-30-2015 at 05:44 PM.
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  #9  
Old 12-01-2015
fooboo fooboo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
I ignored some aspects of Terry's learning, but this is the way I should do
in the future. I found one more video, David Shen on recovery. His forearm
position is different. In the first moment I thought shoulder to shoulder
line and forearm line should be continuing one other. Shen drops his
forearm. Any idea?
Best regards all.
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  #10  
Old 12-01-2015
RXL RXL is offline
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RXL
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Thanks everyone for the replies so far.
I think the main problem is that what I think I am doing is not necessarily what I am doing. I am finding it difficult to get the right feel for the movement.

I will try some of these steps to see if there is an improvement.
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