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  #1  
Old 08-27-2012
BradMM BradMM is offline
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Default OW training

I've looked at OW swims and would like to do this someday but they want you to average 40 min miles. I can do a 40 min mile in the pool but that's for ONE mile... and it's not in the OW environment.

How do I train for the OW environment if my only place to train is in the pool? My wife is teaching a late class on Mondays so I thought about using Monday's as my long distance training day. I'll swim three miles each time and try to improve my time over time. May not be ready for THIS November's swim but I gotta start somewhere.

I probably should also start doing flip turns instead of open turns to better emulate the type of swimming required.

What do you think?

Brad
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  #2  
Old 08-27-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BradMM View Post
I've looked at OW swims and would like to do this someday but they want you to average 40 min miles. I can do a 40 min mile in the pool but that's for ONE mile... and it's not in the OW environment.

How do I train for the OW environment if my only place to train is in the pool? My wife is teaching a late class on Mondays so I thought about using Monday's as my long distance training day. I'll swim three miles each time and try to improve my time over time. May not be ready for THIS November's swim but I gotta start somewhere.

I probably should also start doing flip turns instead of open turns to better emulate the type of swimming required.

What do you think?

Brad
Sorry I didn't understand the reference to your post and the 40 minute time, unless you meant something to do with a TI open water camp?

2 drills you can do in the pool to prepare for open water is to practise sighting by looking forward mid stroke once or twice a length and also on other lengths, try closing your eyes for 4 full strokes and see if you stay on course.
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  #3  
Old 08-27-2012
BradMM BradMM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
Sorry I didn't understand the reference to your post and the 40 minute time, unless you meant something to do with a TI open water camp?

2 drills you can do in the pool to prepare for open water is to practise sighting by looking forward mid stroke once or twice a length and also on other lengths, try closing your eyes for 4 full strokes and see if you stay on course.
To qualify for the swims I've looked at, you should swim a mile OW in 40 minutes or less. Does that answer your question?

I'm not to the point of concerning myself with sighting but thanks anyway.

Brad
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  #4  
Old 08-28-2012
CoachPaulB CoachPaulB is offline
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Default Assimilate to the environment

Brad,

If you can't train in OW then the next best thing is to get in the OW whenever possible. Train in the pool but get out in the OW when ever you can. Ive seen too many excellent swimmers freakout, not because of lack of athleticism, but because of disorientation when they first enter OW. So go and play in the water if thats all you circumstances permit. Get comfortable with lack of visibility and current and chop and wind. Recently I was participating in an event that had a lot of seaweed and or hydrilla in our path and many swimmers couldn't or wouldn't swim through it because they'd never experienced it before. TI provides us with much of what we need to assimilate to the conditions around us so a little up front exploration in the OW will go a long way when race day comes.
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  #5  
Old 08-28-2012
KatieK KatieK is offline
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Practicing in open water is great for learning how to deal with conditions and build confidence. It's also a lot of fun. But it's not great for building speed.

Training in the pool is the best way to get faster. If your pool mile (1750 yards) is 40 minutes, that means you're swimming 2:16 per 100 yards. You'll need to get that down to around 2:00 in the pool to be confident about making the cut-off for longer open water swims.

At your current pace, the best way to get faster is to improve your form. Drills, tempo trainer sets, and counting your strokes will help with that. I would suggest sets of 100 yards or less. As your pace gets faster on the 100s, you can gradually build up the distance--150s, 200s, etc.
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  #6  
Old 08-28-2012
BradMM BradMM is offline
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BradMM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachPaulB View Post
Brad,

If you can't train in OW then the next best thing is to get in the OW whenever possible. Train in the pool but get out in the OW when ever you can. Ive seen too many excellent swimmers freakout, not because of lack of athleticism, but because of disorientation when they first enter OW. So go and play in the water if thats all you circumstances permit. Get comfortable with lack of visibility and current and chop and wind. Recently I was participating in an event that had a lot of seaweed and or hydrilla in our path and many swimmers couldn't or wouldn't swim through it because they'd never experienced it before. TI provides us with much of what we need to assimilate to the conditions around us so a little up front exploration in the OW will go a long way when race day comes.
We actually have a small lake house right on the water but there's also a marina across this little inlet so there's lot of boat traffic. I was wondering of they have flag I could pull behind me, kind of like dive flags for SCUBA divers...?
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  #7  
Old 08-28-2012
BradMM BradMM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KatieK View Post
Practicing in open water is great for learning how to deal with conditions and build confidence. It's also a lot of fun. But it's not great for building speed.

Training in the pool is the best way to get faster. If your pool mile (1750 yards) is 40 minutes, that means you're swimming 2:16 per 100 yards. You'll need to get that down to around 2:00 in the pool to be confident about making the cut-off for longer open water swims.

At your current pace, the best way to get faster is to improve your form. Drills, tempo trainer sets, and counting your strokes will help with that. I would suggest sets of 100 yards or less. As your pace gets faster on the 100s, you can gradually build up the distance--150s, 200s, etc.
I typically swim about a mile each time. I have glass beads for lap counting but I normally just go by time. You're saying forget that and go with 100 yd "sets" basically? Work in improving my time in a shorter swim and that should carry over to the longer ones...? Makes perfect sense, thanks!

I'm pretty certain I can do the 100 yds in 2:00 right now but I know I'll be gassed when I'm finished. I guess, just like weight lifting, I should take a SHORT rest interval and then do it again to build the endurance at that pace.

Brad

Last edited by BradMM : 08-28-2012 at 01:07 PM.
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  #8  
Old 08-28-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BradMM View Post
I typically swim about a mile each time. I have glass beads for lap counting but I normally just go by time. You're saying forget that and go with 100 yd "sets" basically? Work in improving my time in a shorter swim and that should carry over to the longer ones...? Makes perfect sense, thanks!

I'm pretty certain I can do the 100 yds in 2:00 right now but I know I'll be gassed when I'm finished. I guess, just like weight lifting, I should take a SHORT rest interval and then do it again to build the endurance at that pace.

Brad
faster speed 100yd sets with short rest is great advice

You could try 4x100yds swimming at 2.10 with 20 seconds rest.
Rest an extra minute

Repeat 4 times.

When you get good at that go down to 2.05's with 20 seconds, then 2.00 with 20 seconds, then try to do the whole 16 repeats without the extra minutes.

I am doing similar today when I get to the pool.
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  #9  
Old 08-28-2012
BradMM BradMM is offline
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BradMM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
faster speed 100yd sets with short rest is great advice

You could try 4x100yds swimming at 2.10 with 20 seconds rest.
Rest an extra minute

Repeat 4 times.

When you get good at that go down to 2.05's with 20 seconds, then 2.00 with 20 seconds, then try to do the whole 16 repeats without the extra minutes.

I am doing similar today when I get to the pool.
I LIKE IT! I needed a change anyway. Today is kettlebell day anyway... maybe tomorrow.
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  #10  
Old 08-29-2012
KatieK KatieK is offline
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If 2:00 feels like an all-out pace, you might want to start a little slower. At this level, your most dramatic improvements are going to come from improved technique, not fitness.

Another idea is to try to do 100 yards at the lowest possible stroke count. Time yourself, just so you have a point of reference, but don't worry about how slow or how fast you are. Then try to do several 100s maintaining that stroke count. At first, take plenty of rest on those (20s or so). As you improve, you can decrease the rest a little. When your SPL creeps up, do a few lengths of drills before resuming whole stroke practice.

It's nice to vary your workouts a little. Maybe one day focused just on SPL and drills. Another focused on trying to hit the same pace for 10x100 on 15s rest. Maybe a continuous swim every once in awhile. It's also good to add some intensity once in awhile--a few reps at maximum speed.

I also think it's wise to time everything. It's easy to perceive how hard you're working, but hard to perceive how fast you're going. Timing yourself helps you understand what is and isn't working.
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