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  #1  
Old 02-17-2011
tstick14 tstick14 is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2011
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tstick14
Default rotation for floatation

Just a breakthough this morning for me that I wanted to share.

I've been doing the underswitch drill (2-pause)for two sessions now, but always seemed to find myself deeper in the water after the switch then I thought I should be. I came to realize that though my shoulder was just out of the water my hips were flatter than my shoulders, so little or no hip drive. Made more of a conscious point to aim my hip up (45deg) and to drive it before my hand spear and "hello!" I was surprised how high it kept my body to the surface! Talk about easy breathing. I'll be the first to admit that I'm not always comfortable in water and it didn't help when I would switch and find myself under water. It may be too much rotation, but it puts me where I feel I'd like to be after a switch.

Just thought I'd share, in case some others out there may be having some issues similar to mine.
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  #2  
Old 02-17-2011
Scotty Scotty is offline
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Scotty
Default Similar Problem in Zen Switch

Tstick:

I encounter the same issue in Zen switch. I have good buoyancy skating on either side, with a relaxed kick barely breaking the top of the water. But when I begin Zen switch and the fingertips of my recovery arm pass my waist, my upper body (and probably lower) sink deep into the water. I still manage to get a nice rotation and glide which eludes me in wholestroke.

I'm surprised at this sinking because in land drills this motion seems to benefit shifting my weight toward the front of my body so I should be swimming downhill and pressing my chest.

Does anyone have an idea why doing Zen switches with a nice slow recovery led by the elbow with fingertips touching the surface would cause my body to sink?
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  #3  
Old 02-17-2011
DesertDog DesertDog is offline
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Default Zen Switch Body Sink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty View Post
Tstick:

Does anyone have an idea why doing Zen switches with a nice slow recovery led by the elbow with fingertips touching the surface would cause my body to sink?
I would say you need a wider track. If your track is too narrow then your body compensates for the extra weight by sinking.
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  #4  
Old 02-17-2011
cynthcor cynthcor is offline
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cynthcor
Default Yaaaaa

These little accomplishments are so rewarding aren't they.

Good for you and keep up the practice.
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  #5  
Old 02-17-2011
KatieK KatieK is offline
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Default

The most likely explanation for your upper body sinking after a weight shift is that you're lowering your head when you shift. I have a tendency to do that too--maybe something about lowering my head in concentration.

When you lower your head, it forces your upper body deeper into the water. The feet actually float upward. A slight up-and-down movement of the head can cause dramatic up-and-down movement of the body.

When you practice the shift, try to keep an awareness of your head's position in the water. It should stay in the same place during the shift. Your face moves when you breathe, but your *head* should in the same place relative to the surface of the water. It might help to imagine a ball with a face drawn on it floating on the water. You can rotate the face up or down, but the ball doesn't move up or down in the water.
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  #6  
Old 02-17-2011
bx bx is offline
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bx
Default

Well, this wins top prize for a well-timed posting! tstick14, I was having exactly the same issue, having only recently started switches. I'll certainly focus on my hip angle and see if that's the problem for me too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tstick14 View Post
Just thought I'd share, in case some others out there may be having some issues similar to mine.
Yup, thanks for sharing, absolutely!
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  #7  
Old 02-18-2011
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Default

You could also be rotating too far on your side which can also make you tend to sink more especially with a slow recovery .Rotate enough to clear the shoulder.

Dave
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  #8  
Old 02-18-2011
mandll mandll is offline
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mandll
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty View Post
Tstick:

Does anyone have an idea why doing Zen switches with a nice slow recovery led by the elbow with fingertips touching the surface would cause my body to sink?

Your center of buoyancy changed and possibly over rotating. A couple possible causes from my experience.....maybe just need a better counter balance with other arm or head position...or...your rotating too far to one side and need to stay flatter...or..you are not keeping wide track through your whole stroke cycle. If you extend all the way through the back end of the catch/pull and recover straight forward from this position your recovering arm may end up too close to you and bind your recovery forcing a more stacked position leading to and awkward recovery, over rotation and a center of buoyancy shift and thus the sinking. to sum up I think you need to keep wide tracks and not over rotate....and...swimming with a very slow turnover will require better counter balancing in your stroke.

just my $.02 worth. hope it helps
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