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  #1  
Old 06-16-2012
kalinma kalinma is offline
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kalinma
Default Horizontal Position

What is the secret to keeping the legs high and maintaining a horizontal position in the water? Many non-TI people would say a good solid kick will do it. Some recommend arching your back. I know that furiously kicking is not part of TI, and I don't think that arching your back is either. I know that I'm not holding my head high as I'm honestly looking straight down at the lines on the bottom of the pool. What is the biggest factor for swimming in a good horizontal position?
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2012
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Default

Good balance and a horizontal body position is the combination of these techniques:
1) Head position, by looking down (not pushing ) and hanging your head so the laser beam out of the top of your head points to the far wall. Also relaxing the neck
2) Spearing your arm to a position where your hand is below your elbow and elbow below the shoulder.
3) Relaxing into and pressing in to the water ( used to referred to as pressing your buoy ) to feel it's support .

Dave
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  #3  
Old 06-16-2012
rolferdon rolferdon is offline
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rolferdon
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In addition to Daveblt's suggestions, I have had some success with the idea of swimming down hill. I have done lots of superman glides with this as a focal point, not sure it will help you but it is a concept that has helped me.
Also have worked with pressing ever so slightly down through the lateral pectoralis/axillary area with skating drills!
Good luck
Don
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  #4  
Old 06-16-2012
azamy azamy is offline
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azamy
Default Your finger tips...

My swimming partner also had this problem, his legs would sink and create some drag. While I was working with him to solve this problem, I went under water and noticed his finger tips pointed upward, I asked him to change the direction of his finger tips and that problem was solved.

Of course daveblt's tips are the key to horizontal body position in the water.

Good luck
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  #5  
Old 06-16-2012
tomoy tomoy is offline
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Default

In addition to the esteemed above:

Arms up front. Superman glide. Front quadrant swimming. If the fulcrum is your belly, having your arms rotating around your shoulders brings the weight further back and legs will sink. You want your arms rotating around your forehead as much as possible.

It's not magic, and it's not entirely limited by body type. It can be done.

Cheers.




Quote:
Originally Posted by kalinma View Post
What is the secret to keeping the legs high and maintaining a horizontal position in the water? Many non-TI people would say a good solid kick will do it. Some recommend arching your back. I know that furiously kicking is not part of TI, and I don't think that arching your back is either. I know that I'm not holding my head high as I'm honestly looking straight down at the lines on the bottom of the pool. What is the biggest factor for swimming in a good horizontal position?
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  #6  
Old 06-19-2012
kalinma kalinma is offline
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kalinma
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by daveblt View Post
2) Spearing your arm to a position where your hand is below your elbow and elbow below the shoulder.
3) Relaxing into and pressing in to the water ( used to referred to as pressing your buoy ) to feel it's support .

Dave
I think 2) is pretty helpful, but I'm not sure what 3) means. My problem seems to be related to fatigue. My first two or three 100-meter laps seem fine. After I become just a little tired, I feel my legs drop and I think I start fighting the water a bit. Tried to remind myself to slow down and think about form.
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  #7  
Old 06-19-2012
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalinma View Post
I think 2) is pretty helpful, but I'm not sure what 3) means. My problem seems to be related to fatigue. My first two or three 100-meter laps seem fine. After I become just a little tired, I feel my legs drop and I think I start fighting the water a bit. Tried to remind myself to slow down and think about form.


No. 3 means pressing in to the water with the upper half of your body or your lungs to help keep your legs up .

Dave
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  #8  
Old 06-22-2012
kalinma kalinma is offline
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kalinma
Default

Had better luck this morning. I believe the following tip helped:

Quote:
Originally Posted by daveblt View Post
2) Spearing your arm to a position where your hand is below your elbow and elbow below the shoulder. Dave
but it also seemed to make a tremendous difference when I actually did "slow down and think about form." I'm not any faster yet, but much less fatigued, and I had significant improvement in getting my legs not to sink.
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  #9  
Old 07-01-2012
kalinma kalinma is offline
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kalinma
Default from blog, Balance Is Profound!

"When you feel balanced in the water, you can swim as slow as you want! That may sound ludicrous to a competitive swimmer. However, the novice expends tremendous energy moving around in the water - disturbing the water - as he/she strives to feel balanced. Without balance, every other element of swimming is formidable. Breathing is a scary proposition, streamlining is inconceivable and propulsion is a struggle of sheer will and determination to survive to the other side.

A swimmer who is comfortably balanced can relax and choose a speed and a breathing rhythm that are sustainable for the chosen distance. This ability to choose any speed within your capacity to maintain consistent and dynamic balance is one of the most empowering and exhilarating experiences in swimming."

Wow! Truer words were never spoken.
Funny thing. As I read more of this blog, I realized that I had read it before. The reason it resonated with me so strongly today is that I had experienced it physically before reading about it. Thank you, Shane Eversfield.
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