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  #1  
Old 03-01-2010
lynncohen lynncohen is offline
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lynncohen
Default Finally got a video

Hey everyone,

Could you please take a look at this and give some feedback? I see my left arm crossing over a lot, and my spear doesn't look nearly as deep as it feels. Just some preliminary observations. Please be kind....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2WLR6nbbeE

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 03-01-2010
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CoachBobW CoachBobW is offline
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Default video analysis

Lynn,
your initial observation of the left arm crossing to the middle is accurate.
But there is much more going on. At the 0:13 second mark, notice how close to the surface the hand is in relation to that arm's shoulder. Higher isn't better. It's putting you into an uphill position which soon becomes apparent. In fact, while the hips seem to be OK at that point, one second later at 0:14 the hips are lower and your needing to crane up the head for air.
Our instrinct of trying to move upward inorder to get air is both logical and oftentimes founded in necessity. If you get unbalanced/uphill, the chin and mouth drop lower into the water. Even an inch underwater means no air, so we do what's required to breath. Everyone does what's necessary. You won't deny yourself a breath. The trick is to avoid doing the things that then require some additional movements/compensations to get back to the water/air interface.
If you think of the leading arm as the minute arm on a clock face, we can see your hand at 10:00 going up. Try subtracting a few minutes of clock time, moving towards 9:00 and then 8:45, 8:30 (a little bit at a time) until the breath becomes easier to get without lifting the head. It seem counterintuitive to spear more downward for air but it's what you need. Go slowly until you find what's right for you. 7:00 would be too far. You'll submaring away from the surface if the angle is too steep.
There's another opportunity for improvement regarding power.
I don't know if your left handed, but you certainly have more power when spearing the left arm. I could well be because you breath on the left and rotate better on that side. Note how you accellerate on some of the strokes when the left arm spears. Not so much on the right because your hips are pretty flat there (the right hip doesn't rise like the left one does). Add a little bit more hip rotation/get the right hip up. Again, add a little at a time until you feel the power. Too much rotation would be poison.
Bob Wiskera, TI Workshop Director, e-mail: wiskera@verizon.net
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Old 03-01-2010
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
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Lynn, two things stood out for me:

1. Your head is too high. Let it fall into the water.

2. Your recovering arm leads with the hand rather than the elbow. You can fix this by recovering with finger tips dragging lightly over the water until the hand reaches its re-entry point.
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Old 03-01-2010
lynncohen lynncohen is offline
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Thanks, Coach Bob. It's hard to translate your observations into physical sensation. The clock analogy...are you saying I need to aim towards 9:00/8:30 with the spearing hand? Thank you so much for your time and attention!
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Old 03-01-2010
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
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Also agree that:

3. You are reaching towards the centre line rather than along wide tracks.

4. You are not spearing deeply enough.

But your stroke looks pretty relaxed so these things can be fixed.
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Old 03-01-2010
lynncohen lynncohen is offline
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Hi Lawrence, The high head....when I'm swimming it really feels like I'm letting it hang; should I be putting any effort into "tucking"? It feels like as soon as I do that, it cuts off breath, creates other issues, impedes freedom. Are there specific drills either of you would suggest I focus on for addressing some of my issues?
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  #7  
Old 03-01-2010
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
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Lynn, definitely don't 'force' the head to hang. It really is a question of getting used to letting it lie in the water without support from neck muscles.
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  #8  
Old 03-01-2010
don h don h is offline
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Default keeping head and upper body low

lynn,

i've had some success lately in keeping the head and upper body low (laser beam pointing forward) during the early part of the stroke by practicing terry's idea that you don't start back with the pull until the other side (high shoulder and hip) is "poised to fall." by introducing a little "gravity" into the rotation, the hands are free to contribute more to forward propulsion, and less to rotation and/or raising up. there are other benefits, as well.

you might try relaxing your neck muscles and "floating" your head (maintain this when rolling for and turning your head for air).

another thing you might explore is controlling how far you rotate (on both sides) by controlling how far your high shoulder and hip "fall" each time. this has been helping me to learn better consistency and symmetry with my rotation.

i also found that by making sure my shoulder and hip fall together, i am getting the experience of riding a "rail" on each side (something new in my case).

good luck.

don h
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Old 03-01-2010
naj naj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynncohen View Post
Hey everyone,

Could you please take a look at this and give some feedback? I see my left arm crossing over a lot, and my spear doesn't look nearly as deep as it feels. Just some preliminary observations. Please be kind....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2WLR6nbbeE

Thanks!
As was mentioned before the lead elbow recovery is what I noticed. The sensation I get when I'm doing it right is my armpit feels like it is getting stretched a bit, thus - if I do things right - I am still in my skating position letting that lead elbow reach my head, dropping it back in the water (fingers first).

Also, you can slow down a bit until you feel more power in each stroke. At the moment it looks as if your not taking full advantage of the glide from the stroke. I also agree that your lead arm is very close to the surface, causing your hips to sink and making you have to swim uphill.

Hope this helps. Your coming along nicely in any event and are a lot further than I was when I first started TI 18 months ago :)

Keep Swimming!
Naji
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  #10  
Old 03-01-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lynncohen View Post
Thanks, Coach Bob. It's hard to translate your observations into physical sensation. The clock analogy...are you saying I need to aim towards 9:00/8:30 with the spearing hand? Thank you so much for your time and attention!
Lynn,
Yes, lower.
There is a best place for your hand when the arm reaches final extension.
That best place is important for two worthy reasons. One, It's producing the cleanest body line and (2) it's the position from which you can begin catching/anchoring more and pulling less. Understanding (sensing) where that best place is and getting there, is more important than how you precisely get there. How you choose to get to that place is full of individual variety and somewhat open to your choice and choosing.
For me, that place for my hand is along a straight line from the finish line to my shoulder. It's likewise approx. as deep as my shoulder is deep with whatever degree of rotation I'm practicing (about 5-6 inches deep). I found with many students that a 'tactile' reminder, feeling the arm contact the side of the head works. Now, the arm can contact the head near the ear hole (9:00 o'clock), sideburns (8:30), cheek (7:30-8:00). You need to try each. When the breath is easy, and you're no longer lifting the head, it's right.
www.swimdallas.com
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