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  #1  
Old 01-17-2012
Rupertdacat Rupertdacat is offline
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Default First video_Da Swimming Cat!

About 20 months into TI. Would appreciate your feedback.

http://vimeo.com/35206147
http://vimeo.com/35206658


Thanks,

Rupe

Last edited by Rupertdacat : 01-17-2012 at 04:50 PM. Reason: fix links
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  #2  
Old 01-17-2012
rbs24h rbs24h is offline
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Thanks for posting Rupe. Good Job.
From underwater cam view, to me it looks like you could take better advantage of your nicely streamlined "legs" if you rotated less. It looks like you're getting "stacked" (almost totally on your side) and trying to glide in that position. That forces you off balance because it is really hard to stay balanced in that "stacked" position and your legs, though staying close together well, stray out to a side to keep balance, causing drag with side to side motion.

On your breathing stroke to right, your lead arm tends to flare outward, "steering" you in that direction, thus ending up very close to lane marker.

I think if you started rotating a little less, remember, shoulders just breaking surface, it may help. On breathing strokes, try to concentrate on keeping lead arm pointing directly in front of your shoulder without it drifting to, say, 2 o'clock direction.. And think generally about everything moving in a forward direction through the water.

You may even try to pick up your SR a touch as that could lend itself to less rotation and less time in that stacked position because you need to rotate back sooner at a faster rate.

Not sure if this is the most concise or clear suggestion(s), but I hope it helps.
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  #3  
Old 01-17-2012
ashby ashby is offline
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Are you self taught? Have you been using a coach? I just wondered if you should try and lift your stroke rate too, it looks too ponderous to me.
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  #4  
Old 01-17-2012
Butiki Butiki is offline
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Yes, legs look streamlined but they're fishtailing a bit with each cycle.

We probably need more angles of your head position but it looks like it's not perfectly aligned with your spine which may be causing the fishtailing. That last breath you took in the 1st video looks like you lifted your chin and angled your head away breaking the neck/spine alignment. But it's not too obvious so I'm not so sure.

One other thing I noticed was your underwater stroke looks really wide, looks like your hand passes almost a foot off the side of your body. Don't know if that's another cause of the fishtailing.
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  #5  
Old 01-18-2012
Rupertdacat Rupertdacat is offline
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The above comments are much appreciated. Once the problems are pointed out they seem so obvious. The over-rotation i will definitely work on. Don't know how to address the wide underwater stroke. Its not something I do consciously.
The slow stroke rate is because I get very winded at any higher rate. Even at this slow rate, I can't go more than 50 yards without having to rest for a minute.

To answer a question above- I have had eight half hour lessons with a TI instructor.

Rupe
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  #6  
Old 01-18-2012
mjm mjm is offline
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Default Zigzag

Rupe: nice videos and having the courage to post. What I notice immediately is that while swimming you move side to side and up and down. All that movement impedes your forward progress and puts you in high drag positions.

Side to side: you spear forward outside your shoulder then during the catch your palm points to the side instead of straight back. So your catch hand moves on a diagonal path. Your legs react to the diagonal catch by swaying side to side. To correct: during the spear think about keeping your index finger straight ahead as your arm stretches forward without straining. In the arm forward position the hand, arm, head, shoulders, torso, hips and legs should all align as straight as an arrow. During the catch, keep your palm facing the wall behind you--start far in front and maintain that palm position as long as possible.

Up and down. Your head follows your deep, steep spear. Try not to spear as deeply and swim as horizontal as possible.

One final note. Swimming so slowly challenges your balance more than moving a little faster. Try walking in slow motion: take one step, stop while standing on one leg, take another step, stop--much harder than stepping smoothly without pausing even at a slow rate. Try riding a bike while barely moving forward. All are more difficult at slow speeds and swimming is no exception. No rule says you must complete a lap: try to build from one or two strokes done with the hints above and smooth, slightly faster, and continuous turnover--then stop. Keep at it and build to more strokes. If possible have someone watch and offer feedback. Swim and live in peace. mjm
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  #7  
Old 01-18-2012
Rupertdacat Rupertdacat is offline
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Rupertdacat
Default ZiGzAg

Thank you mjm. Can't wait to go to the pool tonight!

Rupe
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  #8  
Old 01-18-2012
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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Rupert,

Got to ask, was this video done at the MN Y. The brief audio I picked up sounded like one of the coaches from there.

If so where are you located as I am thinking of getting back up there some time in March or April.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
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  #9  
Old 01-20-2012
boken boken is offline
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Hey Cat, it is good that you've sent in some video. I have a couple things for you to try.

How's your superman float (not glide)? Your balance can be upset by a number of things already mentioned previously. You can also work on improving your balance so things like that have less of an effect.

I like superman float for this reason. Try floating there with no forward motion. Forward momentum helps avoid or cover imbalances (hence some of the advice on the faster rate). Practice floating at a dead stop. Do it until there is no wiggle or wobble and your butt and heels stay up. Then have somebody disturb you and see how quickly you can regain position. You will be able to do this quicker with practice. Once good at that, practice a stationary superman sideways (one shoulder up one down). This is hard but helps you learn stability at extreme positions. When you swim you are always being torqued this way or that by your strokes and kicks and water turbulence. Part of the strategy is to minimize the sideways forces you exert on yourself with your stroke habits and the other is to learn how to deal with the disturbances (from you or your environment) without resorting to splayed positions.

I am also in support of the idea of trying a faster stroke rate for the reasons already described. But I will add that there might be an added benefit to your stamina besides removing the tendency to get too stacked/out of balance.

You said you've tried a faster rate, but when you do, are you also remembering to put less power behind it? This is like shifting down on your bike. You pedal faster but put less energy into each stroke. If you try to go at a faster rate but don't power down, you might very well run into stamina issues. But if you back off each one, the quicker rate will lead to less time between breaths and may actually help you keep going for longer distance because you are breathing more frequently. I can swim at a slow rate but I can't keep it up because my breathing rate is too slow. If I speed it up (but put less in each stroke) I have a more comfortable breathing pattern and can go much further.

Also, I find that I magnify any imbalance if I try to put a lot of energy behind a stroke. Lightening it up lets me keep a more stable stroke and body position because nothing is straining beyond its capability or trying to exert a whole lot of torque. Your arm is on the side of your body. If you put a lot on the side you will turn just like a canoe will turn if the paddler really hauls on the oar.

Even if you don't increase rate, see if backing off on the power helps your stability. Something to experiment with.

Cheers
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  #10  
Old 01-22-2012
Rupertdacat Rupertdacat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westyswoods View Post

Got to ask, was this video done at the MN Y. The brief audio I picked up sounded like one of the coaches from there.

If so where are you located as I am thinking of getting back up there some time in March or April.
Hi Westy-

Good ear! I live in St. Paul and swim at the mid-town and uptown Ys. Would love to swim with you...

Rupe
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