Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 03-30-2017
CoachStuartMcDougal's Avatar
CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
coach
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,353
CoachStuartMcDougal
Default

Hi ti97,

Both are good focals, but sometimes "drawing the line" the hand ends up too close to body and elbow rises above (behind) the back impinging (pinching) shoulder joint and triggers imbalance. The upper arm/humerus is most important, forearm position is more consequential. Often I'll have a swimmer briefly go to straight arm recovery to relax the shoulder, release arm wide (arm extended past the hip) and keep upper arm below the back plane as recovery arm swings forward

A focal I use frequently with straight arm is visualize swimming between two whiteboards, imaginary dry-erase pen on fingertips - draw a big "C" on whiteboard from exit past hip to entry in front of head with a straight arm recovery. As this upper arm motion swing with relaxed shoulder becomes imprinted and natural, path of humerus falls below back plane (no shoulder pinching) then begin to relax forearm with hand closer to the water. Path of humerus remains the same whether forearm is extended (straight arm) or hinging at the elbow.

The shape of recovery depends mostly on tempo, fast tempo centrifugal force will extend forearm (straighter arm); slower tempo, gravity allows the forearm to hinge more at elbow.

Stuart

Last edited by CoachStuartMcDougal : 03-30-2017 at 11:54 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-31-2017
ti97
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachStuartMcDougal View Post
Hi ti97,

Both are good focals, but sometimes "drawing the line" the hand ends up too close to body and elbow rises above (behind) the back impinging (pinching) shoulder joint and triggers imbalance. The upper arm/humerus is most important, forearm position is more consequential. Often I'll have a swimmer briefly go to straight arm recovery to relax the shoulder, release arm wide (arm extended past the hip) and keep upper arm below the back plane as recovery arm swings forward

A focal I use frequently with straight arm is visualize swimming between two whiteboards, imaginary dry-erase pen on fingertips - draw a big "C" on whiteboard from exit past hip to entry in front of head with a straight arm recovery. As this upper arm motion swing with relaxed shoulder becomes imprinted and natural, path of humerus falls below back plane (no shoulder pinching) then begin to relax forearm with hand closer to the water. Path of humerus remains the same whether forearm is extended (straight arm) or hinging at the elbow.

The shape of recovery depends mostly on tempo, fast tempo centrifugal force will extend forearm (straighter arm); slower tempo, gravity allows the forearm to hinge more at elbow.

Stuart
Stuart,

Then, if we translate the coordinates, the proper humerus motion in recovery is like doing 'jumping-jacks'? If you do jumping jacks and touch hands behind plane of your back, shoulders will impinge.

The whiteboard is a good visual...

My focus was on a high elbow and wide drag of the finger tips.....sounds like a relaxed shoulder is a more important focus and the wide 'third rail' recovery locus will be a consequence....

Thanks

BTW, I recall someone (maybe Counsilman) writing that it takes about 100,000 repeated motions to 'burn in' a change to the system. Dirt comes off the oven the same way it goes on....on layer at a time......
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-31-2017
CoachStuartMcDougal's Avatar
CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
coach
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,353
CoachStuartMcDougal
Default

Hey ti97,

Jumping jacks is a good example of both arms sliding just in front the back plane (aka frontal plane), you have enough range of motion to touch fingertips above your head. Impingement happens when elbow/humerus moves at or behind back plane when standing upright (or above back plane when horizontal). Here's a dryland rehearsal moving arms on the back plane (lifting elbow) vs swinging elbow/humerus in front of the back plane: https://youtu.be/sQoQYvQkuk8

re: 100,000 repeated motions to imprint. That probably came from Counsilman. I have always challenged that theory since it's an over generalization and every human is unique. There are major movements (intentional) and minor movements (consequential) - and neural adaptations. Correcting major movement patterns can be done far less than a 1000 moves, neural adaptations allow movement patterns to hold up under stress. Competitive swimmers who have swam since their youth have a large range of aquatic neural adaptations, movement errors supported by hundreds of thousands of strokes are easily corrected and hold up under stress. Those starting swimming later in life who are now adapting to an aquatic environment will need more time for correct movement pattern to hold up under stress as those neural circuits mature - some will mature faster than others. In any case, the 100,000 theory is a generalization (really a simplification) that unfortunately has driven many away from swimming (and other sports) leaving the athlete believing they will never get any better and are somehow flawed.

Stuart

Last edited by CoachStuartMcDougal : 03-31-2017 at 02:49 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-04-2017
CoachGeorgeRandall's Avatar
CoachGeorgeRandall CoachGeorgeRandall is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 19
CoachGeorgeRandall
Default

Hi Rajan,

As part of my relaxed recovery arm practice sessions I find that having my students practice knuckle drags on the surface of the water positions their recovery arms correctly away from the body.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.