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  #1  
Old 09-22-2015
Big Chris
 
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Default Sea Anchor Kick

I am starting to think that like people who seem genetically incapable of rolling their Rís I will never get a functional kick.

Over the years I have tried different things, nothing seemed to move me forward and only a few kept my legs from sinking towards vertical. At the moment I am concentrating on keeping my head down and a belly full of air while my lags dangle. This will keep me from drowning for a very slow mile or more. I do try flippers and no arm stroke once and while. Rarely, just when I am getting too tired, my kick with flippers seems to come together but then I canít repeat the experience next time.

What do I do?
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  #2  
Old 09-25-2015
Ron Bear Ron Bear is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 76
Ron Bear
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Not a coach. Not an expert, but I did help my friend through this exact dilemma. Your main problem is likely inflexible ankles. When you kick your toes should be pointed down. This is 90 degrees different than how you point them to walk. I suspect you have "walk pointing" while trying to swim. Wearing fins can help you get the feel of letting your feet relax back into position as your leg forms the downstroke. My friend had to swim with zoomers for about six months. With the zoomers on his toes were pointed back. Not quite straight back, but more back than down. When the zoomers came off he would: 1) Kick too fast 2) Point his toes more down than back. After about three months (of constant zoomers) he could take them off for about a length before he started kicking badly again at which point the zoomers went right back on. By 6 months his non-zoomer kick was about the same as his zoomer kick and we got rid of the training wheels forever.

Sitting at your computer, point your toes. I am guessing that the top of your foot points up 45 degrees or more from the line of your shin bone. I can easily get the top of my foot even with the line of my shin bone. If I am wrong about the inflexibility of your ankle, then I am wrong about what to do to fix your kick.

Hopefully I am guessing right,
Ron
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  #3  
Old 10-06-2015
Big Chris
 
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Ron, thanks for the reply.

Fins do seem to be what people suggest. Flexibility seems so simple but the simple solution is usually right. My feet really wonít point down very far. I had planter fasciitis years ago and the long term solution was to make an effort to keep my ankles pivoted to bring my toes towards my knees as much as possible when sitting or sleeping. This has been good for my feet but maybe it was not so good for my swimming.

I will stick with the fins. Didnít realize it could take so long. Can you really stroke your arms when using fins? It seems like even with a poor kick the fins make you go so fast that working the arms seem silly.
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  #4  
Old 10-06-2015
michaelmarshall5030
 
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Actually this sounds so familiar. I posted something a few weeks back related to this; but for me it was more of a buoyancy problem, not a kicking problem. I used fins to try to fix the issue, but in the end they became a crutch.

I am not a coach, nor claim to be an expert at swimming, but I have received so much great advice from Coach Stuart that might be helpful to you. Have you tried doing the Superman Glide? I mean doing it over and over, over and over, over and over; having someone watch you as you do it, providing feedback until you can remain level in the water, where it becomes first nature. Coach Start suggested that I incorporate the Superman Glide into my regiment, even using a swimmer's snorkel to not worry about anything but acquiring the skill of being level and on the surface. Discovering TI has taught me to start with the fundamental basics of body mechanics, "mastering" one thing at a time before trying to achieve my final goal of swimming perfectly. Just throwing this out there...

Last edited by michaelmarshall5030 : 10-06-2015 at 01:12 PM. Reason: Punctuation error
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  #5  
Old 10-07-2015
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
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jenson1a
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Ron

Don't understand your statement:

When you kick your toes should be pointed down. This is 90 degrees different than how you point them to walk. I suspect you have "walk pointing" while trying to swim.

I thought the toes s/b pointed back when kicking. If they point down, doesn't that create drag? When your friend started using zoomers, you said this:

With the zoomers on his toes were pointed back. Not quite straight back, but more back than down. When the zoomers came off he would: 1) Kick too fast 2) Point his toes more down than back.

Is having the toes pointed back a good thing or bad thing?

Sherry
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  #6  
Old 10-07-2015
Ron Bear Ron Bear is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 76
Ron Bear
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Yes I noticed that mistake when I re-read what I wrote. You see, I wrote that sitting at my desk and when I first wrote "down" I literally pointed my toes and since I was sitting, they went from pointing forward to pointing down and that is what I wrote. As I got into my explanation I started thinking of a swimming position where un-pointed is down and pointed is back and that is what I wrote. I screwed up. Sorry it was confusing.

Ron
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