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  #41  
Old 07-30-2013
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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I will experiment with even slower speeds and report back.
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  #42  
Old 07-31-2013
Talvi Talvi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
In the video I posted above
I can't find that video :( Would you repost the link please?


btw
I watched a new GWR on TV for hopping, on a treadmill. It was about 6 mins. It occured to me that a record for "hopping" with two legs (running) would be many hours. Even if the rate of hopping, for one leg, may be say twice that of each leg in two-legged hopping (running) the difference between the records would be at least 1000:1 and probably many times that. This must surely be to do with residual tension, and in a large part caused by the greater difficulty in maintaining balance.
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  #43  
Old 07-31-2013
StuartK StuartK is offline
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As a very recent member of the one mile club, I blush to give any advice, but I agree that swimming slow was the key for me, as someone posted, once you give yourself 'permission to swim slow' all sorts of 'manageable' problems appear that you never noticed were there, but one at a time now they can be worked on. Balance becomes paramount, once this is achieved breathing becomes easier and without having to wear yourself out forcing yourself through the water you realise what a pleasant enviroment you are in, which allows relaxation to become possible.
For a long time I thought my swimming conformed with TI, I'd done the drills, I was even complemented on my smooth swimming, a seven year old said my swimming was 'cool'. The only problem was it fell apart after 100m! and though not panting I could not go on. After slowing right down then my balance was obviously not as good as I thought, after sorting that, on to breathing which took a little while (lifting my head! which I was now able to feel was affecting my balance). Then feeling the water flow past my forearm slow, before taking a stroke and the stroking steadily feeling the 'solid' water, not rushing, as Charles says that's a 'public health issue'.
Take your time, as I said to myself every time I went to the pool 'take it easy you WILL get there', in the end I even convinced myself!
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  #44  
Old 07-31-2013
Talvi Talvi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartK View Post
As a very recent member of the one mile club,
STUART!! When? Where did you announce this to us! CONGRATULATIONS dear manatee :) What fantastic news! Well done you. Time for a celebratory tipple!!
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A psychological disorder is: "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation."
~ George Kelly

"The water is your friend.....you don't have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move."
~ Aleksandr Popov
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  #45  
Old 07-31-2013
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartK View Post
As a very recent member of the one mile club, I blush to give any advice, but I agree that swimming slow was the key for me, as someone posted, once you give yourself 'permission to swim slow' all sorts of 'manageable' problems appear that you never noticed were there, but one at a time now they can be worked on. Balance becomes paramount, once this is achieved breathing becomes easier and without having to wear yourself out forcing yourself through the water you realise what a pleasant enviroment you are in, which allows relaxation to become possible.
I'm pretty much convinced that many humans feel the need to swim at a minimally fast speed, a pace under which they fear of falling down the bottom of the pool. It's subconscious but it's there. Mind you, when we swim in public pool sessions, that fear is more pragmatic. You fear of slowing down people behind you (which in itself doesn't make sense, as faster swimmers prefer passing those that are much slower, than those who are just a tiny bit slower than them).

Slowing down / extending the distance, the first few times, often triggers a lot of emotions, feeling of euphoric vertigo, like "Oh what's going on I never swam that long; usually bad things happened when I tried; should I keep going? I feel dazed, a bit dizzy, euphoric but all that doesn't hurt; should I try another 200m?". At this point, your body controls your mind.

Yes try another 200m. An then another one. After a whilst, this massive release of stress hormones will tame itself and you'll be swimming in calm waters. At this point, your mind controls your body.
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuartK View Post
Take your time, as I said to myself every time I went to the pool 'take it easy you WILL get there', in the end I even convinced myself!
If one doesn't have this inner voice to oppose to the state of euphoria described above, one may stop well before reaching any (real or unreal) limit.

Last edited by CharlesCouturier : 07-31-2013 at 03:26 PM.
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  #46  
Old 07-31-2013
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesCouturier View Post
Yeah Coach Sue is back (I'm not the only one to have missed her I'm sure).

@Andy, no in the context that I was referring too, they just pull too hard. What I mean is that they give too much velocity to the hand whilst pulling.

So clearly, in spite of being asked to slow down, they just can not. You understand obviously that their delta between fast and slow is virtually null over longish distances. They have one speed, and it's too fast.
so with that in mind, do you think people struggling would find it easier to swim a mile with closed fists than with open?
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  #47  
Old 07-31-2013
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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I'm "gobsmacked" by the volume of replies my simple question has brought. Thank you one and all!! I fully expected that this "continuance" thing of mine would bring replies with the gist of "just go do it .. turn and don't stop". However all of you have offered comments of understanding of my situation and very helpful suggestions - this has opened up a new aspect of swimming for me. Learning what has worked for many of you gives me new hope, as it were. I can see some of you have been where I am now and have conquered the "beast". I am most grateful for your replies and the sharing of your experiences. The next time to the pool after Charles' first suggestions, I applied the "go slow" technique. This saw me complete my first and second 50M swims (as mentioned earlier in the thread). So I will apply the suggestions with the expectation of great things in the very near future.

I think there is still more info to come from the thread, so I'll be watching for that and for Richard's results.

Mike
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  #48  
Old 07-31-2013
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
so with that in mind, do you think people struggling would find it easier to swim a mile with closed fists than with open?
Yes I do, though it may increase the feeling of vertigo. Never thought about this idea, thanks!
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  #49  
Old 07-31-2013
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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I can't say that I have any blinding flashes of intuition to impart, but I can report that at the end of my practice today, devoted to dolphin undulation with small sculling motion (not having advanced far enough in the NAD to do it without a small scull to get the head out to breathe, although working on getting the hips to do that duty), I did a few lengths of slow front crawl, but not slow enough, I think. Times of around 38 or 39 seconds for 25 meters and SPL of 19 or 20, so definite room for going slower and probably for reduction in SPL.

This could be a very interesting project.
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  #50  
Old 07-31-2013
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
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For now, those exploring the slow path, you may (for now) avoid lowering your stroke count. First thing first, put in the meters...
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