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  #1  
Old 01-06-2013
igorner igorner is offline
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Location: Newfoundland, Canada
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igorner
Default Plantar fasciitis

Hi all,

So I have started with my plan to get a tri in this summer. Then recently, I felt myself hobbling around on my left foot..especially first thing in the morning. Pain under my left heel...sound familiar?

Although I have to go to my GP for the official word I'm thinking plantar fas.
My question to the forum is ...how long is the usual recovery period, and am I correct in assuming that I can still swim and bike? Running will be "out" while I recover presumably.

What a pain! (not referring to its intensity) The good news is that my TI swimming is really improving....strokes are dropping away!
Ian
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  #2  
Old 01-07-2013
cs10 cs10 is offline
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cs10
Default eliminating plantarfasciitis

Have a look at Matt Furey's website. He has a dvd called "Eliminate heel pain and plantar fasciitis in 2 minuites a day". The title sounds a bit gimmicky but the exercises are very simple but sound tendon strengthening and loosening exercises from traditional Chinese healing and martial arts.They also release energy blocks around the damaged area allowing the bodies natural healing energy to do it's work. They are endorsed by one of America's leading foot surgeons who talks on the dvd.

If you are unable to run for a while ,maybe you can take the oppertunity to look at more foot friendly styles of running such as "chi running"The modern Western style of running with over protective shoes and heel landings can be very hard on the foot and body. Since Christopher McDougall's book "Born to run" came out there has been huge intrest in barefoot and minimalist shoe running , but unfortunately a lot of injuries because people are using the minimalist shoes without learning the proper style of running. There is as much detail in the African middle and long distance style of running as there is in TI swimming
Good luck.
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  #3  
Old 01-07-2013
The Parrot The Parrot is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sherborne, Dorset, UK
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Default Healing Heels . . .

[quote=igorner;33719]Hi all,

Although I have to go to my GP for the official word I'm thinking plantar fas.
My question to the forum is ...how long is the usual recovery period, and am I correct in assuming that I can still swim and bike? Running will be "out" while I recover presumably.

Ian,
Bad luck! As you have found, plantar fasciitis can be a very real pain. Recovery will take as long as it takes. It varies with the individual and the severity of the inflammation. You know how to treat it but if it has become chronic do also ensure that there is not an associated heel spur - a calcium spur between the calcanium (big heel bone) and the plantar fascia. If that were the case it might eventually need more drastic measures (even surgery). In the meantime, take a critical look at your running shoes and ensure you are getting both enough support and enough cushioning. A visit to a good podiatrist could be useful and I am sure a consultation with a professional sports specialist in Newfoundland (of the same standing as Suzanne Atkinson MD in the US) rather than your standard MD would be a valuable step(!).

I know that telling people like us to be patient is like telling a duck not to get its feet wet - but be patient and give it a chance!
Best wishes,

Martin T.
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  #4  
Old 01-08-2013
trichos trichos is offline
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Although I still run with cushy shoes, outside of work minimalist toe shoes are my primary footwear. Not sure how long(months?) it took but plantar facilitis has not reoccurred, and I had endured years of on again off again episodes usually in the morning. For sure not a quick fix, but you'll eventually notice a strengthened achilles, better balance, and a closer connection to the earth. Damn smelly hippies were right!

Last edited by trichos : 01-08-2013 at 09:47 PM.
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  #5  
Old 01-08-2013
CoachToby CoachToby is offline
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I agree completely with trichos. Since transitioning to zero drop running shoes around three years ago, I experienced similar improvements in foot strength and function. There is growing evidence that supportive running shoes cause more injuries than they remedy. Christopher Mcdougall's book Born to Run has a great chapter covering running shoes and the running shoe industry.
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  #6  
Old 06-16-2013
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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When I had this problem a couple of years ago, I went to a local shoe store that has one of those pads that you stand on that shows where the pressure hotspots under your feet are. Then they brought out several different makes and models of insoles that they thought might work for my problem. The fourth one, a New Balance Ultra Arch gave instant relief, so I've been using it ever since.
If you can find a shoe store that specializes in shoes for people with medical problems, they'll probably have one of those electronic pads.
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  #7  
Old 07-03-2013
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by igorner View Post
Hi all,

So I have started with my plan to get a tri in this summer. Then recently, I felt myself hobbling around on my left foot..especially first thing in the morning. Pain under my left heel...sound familiar?

Although I have to go to my GP for the official word I'm thinking plantar fas.
My question to the forum is ...how long is the usual recovery period, and am I correct in assuming that I can still swim and bike? Running will be "out" while I recover presumably.

What a pain! (not referring to its intensity) The good news is that my TI swimming is really improving....strokes are dropping away!
Ian
Love yourself enough to consider working with a physiotherapist. Every situation is different. There's only so much you can learn out of forum members that are not in the 'known'.

Even my med students (and I have more than a few) rely on physiotherapists for this sort of issue.

Running shoes with tinier heel padding (for example, 6 or 8mm instead of 12) may help teaching you forefoot running. But to be honest, a good running coach can get you to run correctly regardless of your shoes (as long as the shoes fit you well). Besides, a running coach can help you transiting smoothly to more minimalistic approaches, as opposed to going all out which could trigger other issues.

So a physiotherapist and a few running clinics would be my recommendation.

Last edited by CharlesCouturier : 07-03-2013 at 07:18 PM.
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