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  #1  
Old 04-28-2017
scribe3 scribe3 is offline
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Default exhale

I was wondering what guy's think about this video, about breathing, in which the guy state, elite swimmers hold there breathe until there head turns to breathe they don't start exhaling until there head is turning to air.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-k7n60ZelRo
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  #2  
Old 05-01-2017
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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The only real rule about exhaling is to time it so that your lungs are empty when your mouth breaks the surface, so that you can immediately inhale. I can believe that it might be common for elite swimmers to begin exhaling relatively late, simply because they tend to be leaner (and consequently less buoyant) than many of us, so they might have trouble staying at the surface if they don't begin exhaling at the last moment. But other swimmers who are more buoyant may find that it works better to exhale continuously.


Bob
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  #3  
Old 05-01-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBobM View Post
The only real rule about exhaling is to time it so that your lungs are empty when your mouth breaks the surface, so that you can immediately inhale. I can believe that it might be common for elite swimmers to begin exhaling relatively late, simply because they tend to be leaner (and consequently less buoyant) than many of us, so they might have trouble staying at the surface if they don't begin exhaling at the last moment. But other swimmers who are more buoyant may find that it works better to exhale continuously.


Bob
On the other hand, elite swimmers, no matter how lean, swim at much higher velocities than non-elites. Therefore the "planing" action of their trunk should effectively act as a hydrofoil to get their bodies higher so their access to air is nowhere as difficult as us slower dense swimmers, so they are not as likely to need to resort to extremely delayed exhalation for extra buoyancy. Also, at higher velocities the water trough behind the head is deeper, adding to the ease of getting air; maybe this gives them a slightly larger window of timeto allow for for judicious delay of exhalation.
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Old 05-01-2017
Tom Pamperin Tom Pamperin is offline
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I'm definitely in favor of continuous exhaling--holding your breath induces tension, which interferes with the necessary relaxation. And I think it also causes a feeling of panicky breathlessness in most of us, which interferes with technique and mental focus even more--it's much less stressful to exhale slowly than it is to hold your breath to me.
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  #5  
Old 05-02-2017
scribe3 scribe3 is offline
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Default breathe

I always try to slowly exhale through the nose and then empty most air on the roll
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  #6  
Old 05-18-2017
novaswimmer novaswimmer is offline
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All this depends on body type, whether you are sprinting or swimming at a slower pace, etc. etc. If you are swimming at a slower pace, I can't imagine holding your breath in.
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Old 05-18-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Originally Posted by novaswimmer View Post
All this depends on body type, whether you are sprinting or swimming at a slower pace, etc. etc. If you are swimming at a slower pace, I can't imagine holding your breath in.
Do you mean at a slower pace there is a long time between breaths, so it feels natural not to breathe out even a little for and extended length of time?

You feel better breathing out slowly and continuously?

I take it you don't have any problem with buoyancy, i.e. you don't need as much air as possible (even in between breaths) in you to help stay afloat.
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  #8  
Old 05-19-2017
bujanglokal
 
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WHat about not exactly continuous exhaling but exhaling by mouth only when you spear?
like when you breathe every 3 you'll do exhale-exhale-(big exhale-inhale), exhale-exhale-(big exhale-inhale).
I'm learning to exhale continuously slowly, but in the meantime it's easier to do the above.
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  #9  
Old 05-19-2017
StuartK StuartK is offline
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As an older late learner of TI, my experience is that you should try as much as possible mimic your natural breathing pattern, you wouldn't walk along breathing out in short bursts would you? I found early on that breathing out underwater every time I speared (3 times per breath) caused a slow build up in tension and panic started. Once I got back to steady slowly breathing out the panic would go away. It took me at least 18 months practice before I finally managed to swim a TI mile non-stop, so don't rush it you will get there (I was 67). Remember don't practice struggle. 3-4 strokes stop think about and it try again, you will get there.
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  #10  
Old 05-20-2017
novaswimmer novaswimmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sclim View Post
Do you mean at a slower pace there is a long time between breaths, so it feels natural not to breathe out even a little for and extended length of time?

You feel better breathing out slowly and continuously?

I take it you don't have any problem with buoyancy, i.e. you don't need as much air as possible (even in between breaths) in you to help stay afloat.
Yes, if you swim really slowly like me, there's more time between breaths. If I hold it in I am not relaxed and can't get that magic equilibrium between effort and oxygen.

I breathe out slowly and pretty much continuously. I would say I have more problems keeping in a horizontal position (legs lower than chest) than I do with finding air. But with sinky legs comes more effort and it's harder to regulate air.

Last edited by novaswimmer : 05-20-2017 at 01:32 AM.
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