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  #1  
Old 10-04-2009
ames ames is offline
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Default From Superman to Roll to Air

I am only a couple of weeks into TI and working on the drills... I am having a hard time going from skating to roll to air--can't stay streamlined and half the time I get a facefull of water. But, I find it much easier (at least on my chocolate side) to start in Superman flutter and then take one stroke as I roll to air at the same time. My question is, is this a good intermediate step to take or should I keep working on my balance and stay with the original drill?
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  #2  
Old 10-05-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ames View Post
I am only a couple of weeks into TI and working on the drills... I am having a hard time going from skating to roll to air--can't stay streamlined and half the time I get a facefull of water. But, I find it much easier (at least on my chocolate side) to start in Superman flutter and then take one stroke as I roll to air at the same time. My question is, is this a good intermediate step to take or should I keep working on my balance and stay with the original drill?
Yes it is. Now if you take the stroke, breathe, then return to the starting position, you would be doing the catch-up drill.
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  #3  
Old 10-05-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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ames,
There is a caution however. What is causing your rotation when you take the stroke? Most likely, if you are starting in superman, you are rotating because of your arm stroke. You don't want that. You want your stroke to happen because of the rotation. If you can get yourself to do the stroke because you rotate, driven by your kick, then you may have something.

What you HAVE found, is the bow wave that creates the pocket of air for breathing. That is good to note.

As for rolling to air from skate, there is a list of common mistakes. Look for these.
1. skating too stacked. If you shoulders are close to 90 degrees to the water, then your face will be too deep to breathe. Skate more flat, just enough to clear one shoulder, and you will ride higher in the water.

2. Roll from the hips. I don't get the physics of this, but if you roll from the head, you end up under water. If you roll from the hips, you don't.

3. Lifting the head as you roll. Anything above your lungs makes it harder to breathe. Make sure your head stays in line with your spine while rolling like a log.

Note that, as long as you are rolling correctly, both drills have value. Anything that teaches you about how you move in the water is good. Just make sure you are not fooling yourself with the superman version.
I hope this helps
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  #4  
Old 10-05-2009
terry terry is offline
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Ames
Going to air from SF with a stroke is a good idea. It's also much closer to the dynamic of whole-stroke. Here are a couple things to focus on when you do
1) From SG, start the flutter and take the stroke at the same moment. That will give you an exercise in coordinated movement at the same time.
2) Feel yourself grow taller -- from extended fingertips to toes -- as you stroke and roll. And "auger" through the smallest space in the water.
3) Keep your laser beam projected forward.
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  #5  
Old 10-05-2009
ames ames is offline
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Thanks for the input. I will try it both ways and focus on staying tall and rotating from my hips. I'm off to the pool!
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  #6  
Old 01-21-2011
jimburnettva jimburnettva is offline
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This was a very helpful thread. Working on this tomorrow morning!
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  #7  
Old 03-16-2011
CoachMaria CoachMaria is offline
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Hi Terry. Okay, question. I am "practicing" my instructor skills with one of my parents. Yesterday, was the first time she ever put her head under water, but we were able to get through SG and into Skate by end of the first hour. But, she is truly a "sinker"......however, she does not work through her core at all, bending knees to kick and tensing up to breath at all. I toed her through the pool, and really did "hands on" and she was much more comfortable, and was really amazed with her day, but, I am still a little a little worried that she literally submerges and I'm not sure why?????? Any suggestions? Anyone?
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  #8  
Old 03-16-2011
terry terry is offline
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Maria
Fantastic idea to teach your Mom. Shinji's first TI student was also his mom. She's a beautiful swimmer now. And on Feb 6, the morning after I gave a talk on why swimming is the best thing you can do @ 60+ and 60+ is the best time to focus on Kaizen Swimming, Shinji's father - who had shown little interest in swimming instruction - also asked Shinji for a lesson. He learned a lot in an hour.

It's true some people do show a greater tendency to sink, or a lesser ability to float, for anatomical reasons.

In no way does this lessen their ability to learn to swim. Rather it means that the instructor needs to find ways to control their sinking tendency during non-switching drills, like Superman Glide and Skate - including SpearSkate and SwingSkate.
These could include:
1) More frequent pushoffs
2) More constant towing or pushing
3) Fins (keep the kick very light) or a buoyancy aid like the Rangs buoy from Finis -- individual neoprene sleeves that wrap the thighs.

Use these aids mainly to allow more time -- and undistracted focus - in these positions to explore, refine and imprint
- neutral head
- wide tracks and hanging hands
- x/y hand targets
- controlled rotation
- scapular-plane trailing arm position and recovery

When you begin practicing Switches, their rhythmic momentum should be sufficient to keep them in a comfortable position, though you may need to do intermittent towing during Interrupted Switches - which you'll probably be doing anyway to help teach the Patient Lead Hand.

Let us know how this works, and consider also documenting your lessons with your Mom on video.
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  #9  
Old 03-18-2011
bx bx is offline
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There seems to have been a recent flurry of questions about breathing, including from myself a few short weeks ago. I had (another!) massive breakthrough tonight. In fact I had two of them, so I've treated myself to a beer. Here they are:

1. Lead hand much higher up, nearer the surface. It feels horizontal, but it isn't, it's still at the requiste slope. I know, this has been suggested to me before; sorry to be slow on the uptake...

2. Swimming "proud", in both senses of the word. Analysing this, I swam with more tone in my upper back and shoulders. Before I had only been thinking about tone in my abs. Also: on the pull, I am pulling less deeply (ie. higher elbow, or as I think of it, pulling more alongside the body, not three feet below it!). This shallower pull also seems to help me keep my pulling shoulder higher up, ie. more proud of the water. The overall effect was that it felt more like marching along rather than slouching along.

With these two things, I definitely felt cues that I had never felt before. And, the point is - breathing became a total non-issue. I was riding higher up and seemed to have plenty of time to inhale. In case this all sounds a bit smug (I hope it doesn't...) I only did this for one length at a time.

And the other thing I just want to mention - having done some wholestroke practise like this, I went back to trying the underswitch drills. Now, I have little kick propulsion, and have always failed to take a breath, unless I roll all the way onto my back for sweetspot breaths. But now, despite drilling at dead slow velocity, with my new upper-body tone and higher lead hand (Y-axis) position, I just rolled a bit and turned my head a bit, and air was there!!!


I really hope this helps someone.

Ant
x
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  #10  
Old 04-06-2011
bx bx is offline
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Default Don't tuck chin

Another thing I just realised I was doing wrong was unconsciously tucking in my chin a bit when rolling to air. It must have been an anxiety thing. This is relatively innocuous when facing down in the water, but when turned up to breath, it corresponds to the head being lifted. Making a deliberate effort to stay relaxed and chin un-tucked, the ease of access to air improved by an immeasurable amount.
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