Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Swimming In Triathlon
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-16-2011
sbechtel78 sbechtel78 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 10
sbechtel78
Unhappy I get ran over during the swim phase

I'm a TI swimmer - not the best, but since I took TI classes and workshops and have all the dvds and practice "quiet swimming" - I swim with very little bubbles in the water, thus people who swim faster than I are almost on top of me before they realize it because they didn't see the bubbles from my kicks. When I'm swimming in open water, I usually watch for the bubbles to keep going in the right direction so I don't have to sight alot since my sighting technique is pretty bad. Since I am not fast - I try to stay on the outside and in the back of the pack, but the younger and/or faster swimmers that start in the next groups usually catch up and swim right over me. I don't want to stay way outside and swim longer, but I wonder what I should do to speed up - I have a tempo trainer, but I end up getting "out of beat" and can't seem to get faster without falling into old habits. Any suggestions? I have competed in 2 tri's - one sprint, one olympic. My next event is longer - the Devilman in New Jersey on May 7th. I am dreading getting mauled again....... I felt like just grabbing them and dunking them..... It wasn't bad in the sprint but the Nation's Tri in DC was brutal!!!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-02-2011
CoachKris's Avatar
CoachKris CoachKris is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 69
CoachKris
Default

Do some breast stroke that will teach them just kidding I'm sure you dont really wont to kill anyone. To be honest i don't believe that lack of bobbles is a problem here, specially with first swimmers from next wave as I don't believe they don't navigate, beside rocks ain't making any bobbles either and yet people usually swim around them so my advice for you when someone swims into you be a rock stiff up a bit turn the 6bk on and try to keep going.
To speed up work on catch and stroke ratio if you are getting out of beat stay on comfortable range but gradually speed up every session
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-06-2011
HydraFx HydraFx is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Greater Washington DC area
Posts: 11
HydraFx
Default Tri swim headliock

I just finished the General smallwood Olympic tri in County MD. I got a fist and an arm thrown around my head. I also got kicked in the face clearing the buoy. When I looked at my swim standings I noticed that I finished in the top 15% of the overall swimmers. I've always been very patient at the start of the race...not sprinting ahead like so many do. Im reconsidering this for my next race so that I might get out in front and limit my exposure for random clobbering. I know that I don't site as much as I should and this has cost me significant time in cases where there is an easier path to take if I was just more observant. I will be swimming the 4.4 Chesapeake Bay I want to avoid the "pack" even if it means swimming around them. I value not losing my balance and rhythm from being thrashed more then the lost seconds.TI teaches to swim "quiet" but also to adjust to the environment by mindful swimming. Good luck on your next attempt.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-06-2011
naj naj is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 624
naj
Default Occupational hazard

Hi Guys, I know it can be a bit chaotic at the start of races (in particular tris), but that is an occupational hazard of ow swimming. What you might consider doing is working with friends and have them and yourself do a sprint run from the beach and let them swim very close to you, in front as well as in back and on the sides. Practice being mindful of your own stroke. after about five minutes the pack your in will thin out and you can concentrate on catching up to the others who thrash about in the water. You can expend less energy than they and thus conserve your strength for the bike and run. I don't do tris but I swim in ow all year long and know from experience that getting mad at others who are not intentionally trying to kick or hit you is a waste of time. Just plan your work and work your plan and you'll be fine.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-08-2011
CoachKris's Avatar
CoachKris CoachKris is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 69
CoachKris
Talking

hire a few water polo players and place them around you and you shouldn't have any problems with swimmers getting in your way anymore problem solved

but seriously if you don't mind going around the pack then this would be a good idea to stay out of trouble
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-08-2011
KatieK KatieK is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Scottsdale, AZ, USA
Posts: 295
KatieK
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by naj View Post
I don't do tris but I swim in ow all year long and know from experience that getting mad at others who are not intentionally trying to kick or hit you is a waste of time. Just plan your work and work your plan and you'll be fine.
Good advice from Naj (as always). Most contact is totally unintentional. I partially swam over a swim buddy in a practice swim last week--I was sighting on a buoy 200 yards ahead, and I didn't see him in front of me.

The more you sensitize yourself to contact in the water, the less it will bother you in a race (as Naj already pointed out). Once you get used to it, swimming in close contact with other people is comforting.

During a race, it's a good idea to make your turns a little wide if there's a crowd at the buoy. The bottleneck (not to mention all those rogue arms and legs) will slow you down more than going a few yards out of your way.
__________________
KatieK
WaterGirl.co
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-17-2011
atmas atmas is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2
atmas
Default

I'm not really qualified to speak on this subject in part because I'm not an expert on rules and etiquette for tris of any length, but I'm reminded of the rules in skiing that faster skiers always give way to slower skiers. Of course, the rules on the slopes and in the water often work out to, it is easier to ask for foregiveness than for permission. In mass start bicycle race sprints there is often a surprising amount of contact short of takedowns, thus it may be necessary just to get comfortable with incidental contact, however against the rules it may be.
But do not feel obliged to swim faster or longer just to avoid contact with someone too numb to see you smoothly and sleekly swimming ahead of them.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.