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  #1  
Old 12-05-2008
naj naj is offline
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Default Lateral Breathing

I am beginning to start with lateral breathing now that my right side breathing is under control I need to work on the left side. Anyone have good drills to practice in order to improve this venture?
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  #2  
Old 12-05-2008
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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The triple switch drills are designed to develop the muscle memories needed for bilateral breathing. That's how, after years of trying unsuccessfully to breathe on my "wrong" side, I then went to a TI weekend workshop and came out 2 days later doing bilateral breathing.
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Old 12-06-2008
naj naj is offline
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Coach Bob are you talking about Zen Switch? Not sure what you mean by "triple switch" drills.
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Old 12-06-2008
daveblt daveblt is offline
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You can do triple switch in any switch drill like spear switch , zen switch and over switch.


Dave
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  #5  
Old 12-06-2008
terry terry is offline
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Triple Switch would be three switches in any of the Switch drills, which would result in breathing to alternate sides.
Of course, there are two breathing options for the drills - Sweet Spot, and rhythmic breathing.
Though you do roll to your back and pause in your rhythm, Sweet Spot practice in Triple Switch drills can be helpful in developing breathing fundamentals of:
1) keeping head and spine aligned; and
2) breathing more with body roll than head turn.

Rhythmic breathing in Triple Switch drills requires a higher level of skill and coordination. I'd say the most difficult skill to maintain when you first try this is keeping your lead hand (opposite the breath) stable in its palm-back, high-elbow catch position until you begin returning your face to the water. This is illustrated on Lessons Three and Four of the Easy Freestyle DVD.

If you are introducing an unfamiliar breathing side for the first time, often the greatest challenge is in fitting the breath into your stroke rhythm without hitches or interruptions. The Swim and Nod and Skate-Breathe-Skate drills in Lesson Six are designed to help you over that hurdle.

After that it's mainly a matter of deciding your breathing frequency. Bilateral breathing could mean breathing once to the right and once to the left -- i.e. breathing every 3rd stroke or as often as perhaps 20 times to the right, followed by 20 to the left (in open water most likely). At age 57 it's harder for me to breathe every 3 strokes than I used to, so my favorite way to breathe bilaterally is one length breathing right and one breathing left.
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