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  #1  
Old 05-05-2009
FrankJ FrankJ is offline
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Cool winging scapula

Hi,

I am writing from the account of a friend that told me about TI swimming (one of these days I will open my own account). I used to go swimming frequently until two years ago when I injured my shoulder in a car accident. My long thoracic nerve is damaged and as a result I am left with a winging scapula and can no longer lift my arm over the height of my shoulder. My doctors told me that swimming with the winging scapula would not be adviceable as it could cause additional damage to the rotator cuff.

I have seen the videos and it seems that the swimming technique aims for smooth and relaxed strokes. I am wondering whether it would be a good way for me to start swimming again. Does anybody have any experience with these kind of conditions. I would really appreciate any advice on this issue.

Best,
Martin
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Old 05-05-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fjconti72 View Post
Hi,

I am writing from the account of a friend that told me about TI swimming (one of these days I will open my own account). I used to go swimming frequently until two years ago when I injured my shoulder in a car accident. My long thoracic nerve is damaged and as a result I am left with a winging scapula and can no longer lift my arm over the height of my shoulder. My doctors told me that swimming with the winging scapula would not be adviceable as it could cause additional damage to the rotator cuff.

I have seen the videos and it seems that the swimming technique aims for smooth and relaxed strokes. I am wondering whether it would be a good way for me to start swimming again. Does anybody have any experience with these kind of conditions. I would really appreciate any advice on this issue.

Best,
Martin
Interesting. How about starting with a shiny new TI login? hehe It's free!

Is it possible to wear some type of brace or wrap to prevent extreme movement?

What about starting with the sidestroke? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYJ9kXbi-WI

Also, there are many drills that don't require arms or only one arm. In my case, I actually do the dolphin better with my arms at my side. There is the skating drill. Single-arm crawl, backstroke, and butterfly. No-arms breaststroke. Other things...

(I was wondering recently how the shoulder blade actually works and why some high level swimmers have shoulder blades that stick out on the sides.)
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Old 05-06-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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I'm curious if by damaged you mean that no improvement in function is expected. Is there partial function or no function?
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  #4  
Old 05-06-2009
madvet madvet is offline
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It sounds like a complicated injury. It also sounds like it seriously limits you and if you have insurance you should insist on having regular physical therapy.

I find it a little suspicious that they think you will damage your shoulder by swimming, they might be ignorant about swimming movements and are just telling you that to be "safe."

Physical therapists are extremely well educated and I would find a good one who can evaluate what your limitations are. I would think that swimming could benefit the parts that are weakened by your nerve injury.
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  #5  
Old 06-13-2009
nanners5888 nanners5888 is offline
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I'm a sports medicine specialist and I agree with your doctors. Without the long thoracic nerve guiding the scapula properly, you definitely run the risk of damaging your shoulders. If you have no innervation to that nerve, there is more than likely no way that you would be able to swim without injuring yourself. If you do have some innervation, an EMG study will prove this, then I suggest you seek a certified athletic trainer or physical therapist for help to train your scapula to move properly.
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