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  #1  
Old 11-17-2008
want2swim want2swim is offline
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want2swim
Default beginner - lose speed/mometum/ stall while swimming

HI
I am a beginner. I have watched the video and have taken 6 TI swim lessons. I have made progress but am gettign frustrated. Here is what I think is my issue. When I push off from the wall with speed my first 3 or 4 strokes with a breath seem fluid but after that I tend to slow down and basically I think I start to sink making the breathes more difficult. I then have to rotate to my back to breath andwhen I am ready to swim again i feel like i am swimming in slow motion and basically turns into survial instict. I am not sure how to get my stroke to be more powerful or faster so I don't stall. Of course I would like to do a Triathalon in 09 but sees like I am so far away from even thinking about it.
Any ideas?
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  #2  
Old 11-17-2008
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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It's normal to lose a little speed after the intitial push-off. If you are trying to glide for a long time between strokes, that might be the cause.
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  #3  
Old 11-17-2008
Jamwhite Jamwhite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by want2swim View Post
When I push off from the wall with speed my first 3 or 4 strokes with a breath seem fluid but after that I tend to slow down and basically I think I start to sink making the breathes more difficult.
Are you wearing swim trunks or a close-fitting suit? My trunks (and alot of others that I have seen) have pockets which are aligned towards the way that you swim so they catch alot of water and hold your back. I swam with my kids recently in my trunks (a month after shedding them) and it was felt like twice as much effort.

Have you tried not pushing off the wall? Maybe skate for a couple seconds, then do a couple of strokes, see if you are sinking, if so then stop and start again from skate.
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  #4  
Old 11-17-2008
want2swim want2swim is offline
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THX wil try closer swim trunks. I think I might be over exagerating about the wall psuh off. It just seems easier when thier is some momentum then when there isn't. I feel like I have no power my stroke adn perhaps that is why I am stalling or slowing down to a sink
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  #5  
Old 11-17-2008
CoachBrian CoachBrian is offline
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The answer almost certainly lies in streamlining, not power. Try the following:

Superman glide, 2 - 3 minutes
Superman glide with flutter kick (SF), 2 - 3 minutes
SF to skate, 5 - 10 minutes

During the first two drills, focus on the feeling of support from the water, and relaxation. See how little kick it takes to keep the hips up. Don't worry about, speed, just be relaxed and supported.

During the SF to skate, be aware of the same sensations, and then work on some other focal points:
Optimize lead hand placement (depth and width)
Relax the fingers and tip them down
Rotate just enough for the shoulder to peek above the water

Optimize and imprint the position.

Next:

SF to skate to whole stroke, 10 - 15 minutes.

Push off in the superman glide with flutter, move into skate, registering that you're in your optimized skate position. Once you're there, start stroking easily for 4 strokes, and stop. On each stroke, think about hitting that same skate position, each time your hands extend forward. When all 4 strokes feeel equally good, add a 5th, and then a 6th, and so on. Do this all without breathing.

When you feel good about as many strokes as you can do with out breathing, add the Swim and Nod drill, until you can breathe.

This sort of practice will build on what you do well, rather than trying to move directly into whole stroke lengths.

And remember that you cannot swim better than your ability. That means that if you swam 3 - 4 strokes that felt fluid, it wasn't an accident. You made it happen. And if you can do it once, it's repeatable.
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  #6  
Old 11-18-2008
want2swim want2swim is offline
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THX for the respnses-will keep at it
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  #7  
Old 11-18-2008
Zuzana Zuzana is offline
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Hey there,
I felt the same during my first months and I can just confirm that it is a balance and streamlining that cause the problem.
I would follow CoachBrian's advise, for me the superman glide and rotating from there into skating were so far most helpfull in learning.
And I wouldn't give up on that triathlon.
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  #8  
Old 11-18-2008
terry terry is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2008
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Default Always streamline first

Brian's post is an example of the kind of thinking I hope to see become automatic among all TI swimmers.
Are you losing speed to quickly?
Growing tired too easily?

Always look to drag as the cause and streamlining as the solution.

Increasing propulsive power may also -- and often will -- contribute something but not nearly as much, nor as quickly and easily, as will improved streamlining...or anything that saves energy.

Brian's suggestion starts with establishing a sense of weightlessness with Superman Glide. The comfort and sense of control that results allow you to maintain body alignment -- and employ the stroke timing needed to "swim tall" which reduces wave drag.

Taking the time to really feel the support in SG, then holding that feeling through Skating and into a few strokes can really be transforming. As Brian said, you can't swim better than your skill allows. If you feel super for even as few as four or five strokes, you are a super swimmer for those few strokes and can develop a plan to sustain that sensation for more strokes.

As for transitioning from Sweet Spot (on your back) breathing to Sneaky/Rhythmic Breathing, there are drills to help with that in Lesson Three, Four and Five on the Easy Freestyle DVD.
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