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Old 03-25-2016
johynr]]] johynr]]] is offline
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Default calories used.

For a given distance my garmin watch always gives the same calorie consumption regardless of the effort I put in.

I realise that the watch is only a rough guide but when discussing this with a friend she said that for a given distance the calories I used will be the same regardless of the effort I put in. So if I swim 1000m leisurely it will burn the same calories as when I swim 1000m with more vigor.

This can't be right, can it?
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Old 03-25-2016
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johynr]]] View Post
For a given distance my garmin watch always gives the same calorie consumption regardless of the effort I put in.

I realise that the watch is only a rough guide but when discussing this with a friend she said that for a given distance the calories I used will be the same regardless of the effort I put in. So if I swim 1000m leisurely it will burn the same calories as when I swim 1000m with more vigor.

This can't be right, can it?
Calorie calculation is such a difficult and inaccurate process, that in my opinion it is a scam foisted by sports watch and fitness equipment companies like Garmin and Mio and countless others on gullible consumers. There are so many variables that it is futile to think you might be even close to the real number, but the apparently precise number confidently displayed on the readouts may certainly be convincing to the consumer.

For a given swimmer with a consistent degree of efficiency, the energy cost for a given distance, say 1000m, would definitely be higher at a higher velocity, due to the exponentially rising frictional drag of water.

(This rise in energy cost per distance travelled as velocity increases is much more gradual in running, and over the range of moderate running velocities may work out to be effectively zero rise, i.e. a flat line curve).
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