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  #1  
Old 05-02-2018
Rajan Rajan is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2011
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Rajan
Default Skate Position During Recovery

Hello,

I need advise on the following please.

(I was told by a member of this forum that in swimming there is no time when you are not rolling. )


Contrast to above statement, I had practiced to remain in the skate position after start of recovery until hand dips in water. During this period (ie. from start of recovery to reaching at mail slot and hand dips) I do not role and it gives me feeling that I am not moving forward and my head and neck also get tensed.

When I followed the above member's advice - I mean after recovery I allowed hip to move forward, I felt an easiness in neck. But still in doubt which method to follow - To role forward during start of recovery - when elbow starts moves forward - or not. Or should I stick to my previous practice.


Please advise the right method to follow.

Regards

Rajan
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  #2  
Old 05-02-2018
IngeA IngeA is offline
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IngeA
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I'm not really an expert, but I think the rolling movement is not directly connected to the recovery but to the stroking arm. It's the rolling that leads to a high elbow in the stoke and also that activates the core muscles for the stroke.
So where your recovery arm is when rolling depends on how early you begin with the stroke. If you begin stroking when the other arm is spearing you stay in skating position during the recovery. If you begin a bit earlier with your stroke, the body also rolls earlier.

Best regards
Inge
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  #3  
Old 05-02-2018
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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I agree with Inge. The main function of the rotation of your core body about the axis of your spine is to help power your armstroke, so you should initiate it in conjunction with the beginning of your catch.

What is true is that there should be no time when some part of your body is not moving. While you want a patient leading arm, your other arm should begin its recovery as soon as it reaches your hip.


Bob
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  #4  
Old 05-02-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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I keep the lead arm extended gliding in skate whilst i recover the other arm but as the recovering arm is nearing the shoulder the underwater arm begins to drop lower (using pressure from high side arm) then at the instant point of counter rotation beginning the underwater arm hooks the water & flips over from pinke down to thumb down into a strong anchor / hold
then recovery arm plunges in futher out and i vault over the anchored arm

So catch happens with rotation but there is a drop under its own weight feleling for thick water from about half way into the recovery.

Its like a corkscrew,

The hook / catch is somewhere about my jaw level when it lock on
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  #5  
Old 05-02-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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so i get the thick water "hook" in a pinke slightly down orientation then the arm flips with rotation whilst im "hooked"
so it goes from pinkie down elbow under to thump down elbow up

the angle od the hamd is about 30degrees in both orientations (pinkie down to thumb down)
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  #6  
Old 05-02-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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Im not interested in pulling only creating something to hold & push back upon
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  #7  
Old 05-03-2018
Rajan Rajan is offline
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Rajan
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What I have understood from the Post of Inge and CoachBobM that Catch Initiates rolling but until that time I will have to be in skate position from the start of recovery to hand touches the water (Mail Slot)and there is no rolling during this time. Is it right now?

Regards

Rajan


Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBobM View Post
I agree with Inge. The main function of the rotation of your core body about the axis of your spine is to help power your armstroke, so you should initiate it in conjunction with the beginning of your catch.

What is true is that there should be no time when some part of your body is not moving. While you want a patient leading arm, your other arm should begin its recovery as soon as it reaches your hip.


Bob
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  #8  
Old 05-03-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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I start rolling towards the recovering arm when passes shoulder height

If you do fingertip drag drill you will see the point at which you start rolling towards the recovering arm as long as you keep fingertips touching the water (or keep your wrists in the water)
Its a rise & fall motion.
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  #9  
Old 05-03-2018
Mushroomfloat
 
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If you stay up all the way to entry your weight shift will be slamming in
better to let the recovering arm enter and the rest of the body follow through the hole
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  #10  
Old 05-03-2018
CoachStuartMcDougal's Avatar
CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajan View Post
... I had practiced to remain in the skate position after start of recovery until hand dips in water. During this period (ie. from start of recovery to reaching at mail slot and hand dips) I do not role and it gives me feeling that I am not moving forward and my head and neck also get tensed.
Hard to tell without a video, but given your description of feeling tension in neck and deceleration at mail-slot entry is most likely the recovery arm is too close to the body causing tight shoulder and neck. The deceleration is slowing or stalling the arm/hand at entry stunting the momentum of recovery arm. Swing arm away from the body, send its weight and momentum forward. Done correctly, recovery arm will enter correctly without having to slow arm to aim at the mail-slot.

The weight and momentum of the recovery arm rotates the body or initiates rotation, connected to hip rotation and downward kick. This is also referred to as the "weight shift" with whole body coordination - accessing external forces of gravity and momentum for rotation and propulsion.

Stu
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